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^» <* '-"-ail 

TOWN OF WILMINGTON 
Massachusetts 



k3? 



This team won the Lowell Suburban League Championship for the 
1962 season. They went on to State Tournament play eliminating 
Newburyport, Woburn, and Cathedral High Schools. Then they 
entered the play-off for Class B Championship where, after a 
hard fought contest, Randolph emerged the champion. This was 
a team that represented Wilmington well, and the Town may take 
justifiable pride in its members, individually and collectively. 



INDEX 



132 



Accepted Streets 

Ambulance Regulations 

Animal Inspector 

Board of Appeals 

Board of Assessors 

Board of Health 

Board of Public Welfare 

Board of Registrars 

Board of Selectmen 

Boards, Committees, and Commissions 

Building Inspector 

Carter (Sarah D. J. ) Lecture Fund 

Cemetery Department 

Constable 



Council for the Aged 
Directory of Officials 

Dog Officer 

Fire Department . . . . 
Highway Department 
Housing Authority . . . 
Jury List 



Maintenance Department 

Old Middlesex Canal 

Permanent Building Committee 

Planning Board 

Police Department 

Public Library 

Recreation Commission 

School Budget 

School Committee 

Sealer of Weights & Measures 

Sewer Regulations 

Superintendent of Schools 

Town Accountant 1 

Town Clerk 

Town Collector 



Town Counsel 
Town Engineer 
Town Manager 
Town Meetings 



- March 3, 1962 

- April 30, 1962 1 

- May 28, 1962 1 



- Sept. 18, 1962 

- Nov. 6, 1962 



Annual Town Meeting 
Special Town Meeting 
Special Town Meeting 
State Primary 
State Election 

Warrant Annual Town Meeting 

Town Treasurer 

rree Department 

Veterans' Agent 

Water & Sewer Department 

^ew Chestnut Street Pumping Station Front 



- March 2, 1963 1 



76 
25 
27 
30 
10 
90 
86 

8 

2 

4 
29 
19 
40 
73 
85 

3 
27 
24 
36 
84 
71 
69 
74 
43 
20 
22 
42 
21 
52 
44 
38 
15 
46 
30 

6 
12 
16 
28 

2 
95 
08 
12 
14 
18 
26 

9 
39 
26 
13 

Cover 



Board of Selectmen 



To the Citizens of Wilmington: 

Wilmington continued its steady growth in 1962. Established industries expanded. New industries were addt| 
More homes were built. Population and school enrollment mounted. 

Although there was no single spectacular addition to the industrial community, in size or importance com- I 
parative to Avco, the real property value of the Town, the base of our principal tax revenue, did increase j J 
excess of $2,500,000. Preliminary negotiations made during the past year, moreover, forecast well for 

1963. 

All these factors indicate that Wilmington will, indeed, realize its projected 20,000 population level by 197 
But it also means that there will be a need, and a demand, for greater services for its people. 

In addition to this material growth, Wilmington's repute as a community attracted additional state-wide, 
nation-wide and international attention. Its school teams won championship recognition on the athletic 
fields. The vacancy in the town manager's office drew applications from the highest-type professionals in I 
the management field in every part of the United States - as far south as Florida, west as California and' i 
north as Alaska. 



Once again Jeanne Ashworth carried the banner of Wilmington into the national skating championships and 
then into the world championship competition in Japan. 

All these are characteristics which contribute to the composite picture of Wilmington - and the picture 
grows larger and brighter each year. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Board of Selectmen 



Town Manager 



To the Board of Selectmen and Citizens of Wilmington: 

In accordance with the by-laws, a report is pre sented of the work done and busine s s transacted duringthe pas :J 
year by the elected and appointed officers of the Town, the various boards, committees, and commissions. 

With respect to finances, it is to be noted and considered that only about one third of the expenditures are 
subject to control of the Board of Selectmen and Town Manager. With continually increasing costs of educ; 
tion and the assessments of State and County, the burden of holding the tax rate to a reasonable level falls 
on the one-third budgeted by the Selectmen who are obligated to provide for necessary services. It is diffi 
cult to satisfy the constant demand for improved facilities with the revenue available. With the principal 
source of income being taxes from real estate, the fact that the home owner is in a bind is familiar to all. 



While negotiations are constantly going on respecting new industry for the Town, and the advantages of 
locating here being presented by the Principal Assessor, a cure for ever-increasing expenses of town 
government will not be forthcoming in the immediate future. 



At the approaching Annual Meeting, it is hoped the townspeople will accept the recommendations of the 
Finance Committee, as the members have carefully examined the budget for the coming year and have ma 
recommendations as the result of their study. 

Respectfully submitted, 



2 



Harold E. Melzar 
Temporary Town Manager 




DIRECT 


ORY OF OFFICIALS - 1962 








Term 






Expire s 




John D. Brooks, Chairman 


1965 




Wavie M. Drew 


1965 


iOARD OF SELECTMEN 


Charles H. Black 
Donald C. Kidder 


1963 
1963 






Nicholas L. DeFelice 


1964 




Olive M. Sheldon, Clerk 




'EMPORARY TOWN MANAGER 


Harold E. Melzar 




'OWN MODERATOR 


Simon Cutter 


Annually 




George G. Robertie, Chairman 


1964 




John F. Hartnett, Vice Chairman 


1963 


CHOOL COMMITTEE 


Glen E. Connolly, Secretary 
Ernest M. Crispo 


1965 
1963 






Arthur V. Lynch 


1964 




Edward F. Page 


1965 


UPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 


Harold S. Shea 





PERSONNEL ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

John D. Brooks, Chairman 
Albert J. Blackburn, Jr. 
W. Paul Duggan 
Carlo E. Gubellini 



3 



Town Clerk 

o 



Vital Statistics - Chapter 46, General Laws as Amended: 

BIRTHS - final figure for 1961 Three Hundred Sixty-five (365) 

BIRTHS - actually recorded to date for 1962 Two Hundred Eighty-nine (289) 

(This figure will be increased when the final reports are in) 

MARRIAGE INTENTIONS - recorded in 1962 One Hundred Seventeen (117) 

MARRIAGES - recorded in 1962 One Hundred Twenty-three (123) 

DEATHS - recorded in 1962 Seventy-nine (79) 



Chapter 46, Section 15: 

The Town Clerk will furnish to parents, householders, physicians, and registered hospital medical office 
applying therefor, blanks for the return of births as required by law. 



Chapter 114, Section 45: 

Thirty-two (32) Burial Permits have been issued by the Town Clerk as Special Agent for the Board of Hea 
in 1962. 



TOWN RECORDS 



Permits and Certificates of Registration for the Storage of Inflammables: 



These licenses must be registered by the owner or occupant of the land, or by the holder of the license in 
the Town Clerk's office on or before April 30 of each year. Notification will be sent on or about March 1 
If not registered as required by law, the license may be revoked by the licensing authority, after a public 
hearing. 



Inflammables . 73 

Uniform Commercial Code recordings 397 

Federal Tax Lien recordings^ 12 

Uniform Commercial Code terminations 85 

Dog Licenses issued 1, 303 

Duplicate Dog Tags issued 23 

Business Certificates recorded . 20 

Business withdrawals 2 

Business Certificates recorded (Women doing business on 

separate account) . 2 

Fish and Game Licenses issued . 636 

Pole Locations recorded . 17 

Medical Registrations 



6 



)ther Services: 



Beach tags issued in 1962 326 

Certified copies of Births, Marriages, Deaths 158 

Birth record card (abstract) - Used for school entrance, 

driver's licenses, out-of- state travel, and job applications. 251 

Proof of residence - by letter or card undetermined number 

Town By-laws, books, and maps ,_ undetermined number 

'he Town Clerk, in her capacity as a Justice of the Peace, certified an undetermined number of legal papers 
or Town Officers. 

iy virtue of her office, the Town Clerk is clerk to the Board of Registrars. In this capacity, I have 

Worked with the Police on the census 
Kept the voting list up-to-date 
Registered voters during office hours 

Supervised the distribution and filing of nomination papers 

Prepared the ballot 

Hired election workers 

Prepared payrolls for election workers 

Supervised three (3) elections and one (1) recount 

'here are thirty-four (34) books, "Births, Marriages and Deaths" from 1730 to 1898, compiled by 

ames E. Kelley still available at this office. By a vote of the Selectmen, these books are on sale at $1. 00 

ach. 

n order to complete our records, the Town Clerk would like to receive copies of back issues of "Persons 
listed" books. If you have such books and are willing to dispose of them, please contact this office. 



Town Clerk 

o 



Vital Statistics - Chapter 46, General Laws as Amended: 

BIRTHS - final figure for 1961 Three Hundred Sixty-five (365) 

BIRTHS - actually recorded to date for 1962 Two Hundred Eighty-nine (289) 

(This figure will be increased when the final reports are in) 

MARRIAGE INTENTIONS - recorded in 1962 One Hundred Seventeen (117) 

MARRIAGES - recorded in 1962 One Hundred Twenty-three (123) 

DEATHS - recorded in 1962 Seventy-nine (79) 

Chapter 46, Section 15: 

The Town Clerk will furnish to parents, householders, physicians, and registered hospital medical officei 
applying therefor, blanks for the return of births as required by law. 

Chapter 114, Section 45: 

Thirty-two (32) Burial Permits have been issued by the Town Clerk as Special Agent for the Board of Heal 
in 1962. 

TOWN RECORDS 

Permits and Certificates of Registration for the Storage of Inflammables: 

These licenses must be registered by the owner or occupant of the land, or by the holder of the license in 
the Town Clerk's office on or before April 30 of each year. Notification will be sent on or about March IS 
If not registered as required by law, the license may be revoked by the licensing authority, after a public 
hearing. 



Inflammables . 73 

Uniform Commercial Code recordings 397 

Federal Tax Lien recordings^ 12 

Uniform Commercial Code terminations 85 

Dog Licenses issued__ 1,303 

Duplicate Dog Tags issued . 23 

Business Certificates recorded 20 

Business withdrawals 2 

Business Certificates recorded (Women doing business on 

separate account) , 2 

Fish and Game Licenses issued 636 

Pole Locations recorded . 17 

Medical Registrations 



6 



Other Services: 



Beach tags issued in 1962 

Certified copies of Births, Marriages, Deaths. 

Birth record card (abstract) - Used for school entrance, 



326 
158 

251 



driver's licenses, out-of- state travel, and job applicationa 

Proof of residence - by letter or card _ undetermined number 

Town By-laws, books, and maps ,_ undetermined number 

rhe Town Clerk, in her capacity as a Justice of the Peace, certified an undetermined number of legal papers 
"or Town Officers. 

By virtue of her office, the Town Clerk is clerk to the Board of Registrars. In this capacity, I have 

Worked with the Police on the census 
Kept the voting list up-to-date 
Registered voters during office hours 

Supervised the distribution and filing of nomination papers 
Prepared the ballot 
Hired election workers 
Prepared payrolls for election workers 
Supervised three (3) elections and one (1) recount 

There are thirty-four (34) books, "Births, Marriages and Deaths" from 1730 to 1898, compiled by 
Tames E. Kelley still available at this office. By a vote of the Selectmen, these books are on sale at $1. 00 
ach. 

n order to complete our records, the Town Clerk would like to receive copies of back issues of "Persons 
listed" books. If you have such books and are willing to dispose of them, please contact this office. 



Board of Registrars 



In accordance with Section 1, Chapter 3, of the Town By-laws, meetings of the Board of Registrars are 
held on the second Monday of each month for the registration of voters and the conduct of business. Under 
Chapter 626 of the Acts of 1958, this meeting is open to the public and the press, and it is so posted at the 
Town Hall. 

The Board also holds many extra meetings for the purpose of certifying names on nomination papers and 
warrant articles. All-day registrations are held as posted. 

Women, married prior to January 1, must re-register under their marriage name. Naturalized citizens 
must have their naturalization papers with them when registering. 

New residents are requested to notify the Board of Registrars of the date which they take residence in the 
Town. Any change of address within the Town during the year should be brought to the attention of the Boa 
so that your name will not be removed from the voting list in error. 

In order to keep the voting list as up-to-date as possible, the Board annually compares the voting list with 
the yearly census. If a voter's name does not appear in the census, it is subject to removal from the votir 
register. 

A State-wide recount of the November 6, 1962 election for Governor was called for on November 21, 1962 
in the interest of John A. Volpe of Winchester, and on November 23, 1962 in the interest of Endicott Peabc 
of Cambridge. The Wilmington Board of Registrars held their recount of this election on December 1, 196 
The results of this recount may be found in the minutes of the Town Clerk for that date. 

POPULATION - January 1962 13,488 

DOGS - listed by registrars 1, 375 

REGISTERED VOTERS - Sept, 18, 1962 1 , 124 Republicans 

1,626 Democrats. 

2,917 Independents 

5, 667 Total Voters 

I 



8 



Town Treasurer 



Cash in Treasury January 1, 1962 
Total Receipts 1962 

Less Payments by Treasury Warrant 
Cash in Treasury January 1, 1963 



$ 882, 157. 86 
4, 819, 443. 98 
5, 701 , 601. 84 
5, 332, 196. 27 

$ 369,405.57 



PERTINENT DEPARTMENTAL FACTS AND FIGURES 



Total Personnel 

Number of Treasury Checks issued 1962 
Payroll Deductions: Blue Cross/Shield 

Insurance 
R etirement 

Federal Withholding Tax 
State Withholding Tax 
U. S. Savings Bonds 



594 
24, 172 
$ 28, 841. 50 
1, 986. 78 
74, 900. 60 
214, 349. 03 
17, 772. 91 
487. 50 



9 



Board of Assessors 



TABLE OF AGGREGATES FOR WILMINGTON 
OF POLLS, PROPERTY AND TAXES, AS ASSESSED 
JANUARY 1, 1962 



Compiled from the figures entered in the Valuation List: 



Individuals 
14 
4, 050 
147 



All 
Other 
34 
121 

30 



Number of Persons Assessed: 
On Personal Estate Only 
On Real Estate Only 
On Both Personal and Real Estate 
Total Number of Persons Assessed 
Total Number of Polls Assessed 

Value of Assessed Personal Estate: 
Stock in T r ade 
Machinery 
Live stock 

All Other Tangible Personal Property 

Total Value of Assessed Personal Estate 

Value of Assessed Real Estate: 
Land Exclusive of Buildings 
Buildings exclusive of Land 

Total Value of Assessed Real Estate 

Total Valuation of Assessed Estate 



Tax Rate per $1, 000 - $34. 50 

Taxes for State, County and Town purposes, including Overlay: 
On Personal Estate 
On Real Estate 
On Polls 

Total Taxes Assessed 

Number of Livestock Assessed: General 

Horses (1 yr. old or over) 63 
Neat Cattle: (1 year old, or over) 

Cows (Milch) 27 
Bulls 3, Oxen 0, Steers 0, Heifers 23 

Swine (6 months old, or over) 44 

Sheep (6 months old, or over) 6 

Fowl 

All Other 95 

Number of Acres of Land Assessed 



Total 



48 

4, 171 
177 

4, 396 
3, 572 



110, 675. 00 
163, 500. 00 
29, 795. 00 
1, 250, 055. 00 



1, 554, 025. 00 



6, 021, 225. 00 
48, 244, 400. 00 



54, 265, 625. 00 
55, 819, 650. 00 

53, 613. 86 
1, 872, 164. 07 



7, 144. 00 



1, 932, 921. 93 



Farm Animals 



Number of Dwellings Assessed 



73 
26 
744 
3 

8, 650 
1, 015 

10, 340 

3, 501 



10 



RECAPITULATION - 1962 



Total Appropriations (Taxation) 

Total Appropriations (Available Funds) 

Tax Title Foreclosures 

Overlay Deficits (Overdrafts) 

Total Deficits (Abatements) 

Pension Fund 

State Parks and Reservations 
State Audit 

Metropolitan Sewerage 

Metropolitan Sewerage Connection Charge 
County Tax 

Tuberculosis Hospital Assessment 
Overlay 

Gross amount to be raised 



$2, 428, 020. 70 



212, 795. 


38 


215. 


00 


39, 383. 


21 


8, 383. 


80 


34, 127. 


75 


5, 209. 


26 


1, 763. 


38 


31, 804. 


58 


7, 660. 


14 


19, 969. 


83 


4, 973. 


63 


78, 819. 


90 



$2, 640, 816. 08 



232, 310. 48 
2, 873, 126. 56 



Less Estimated Receipts and Available Funds: 






Income Tax 


183, 605. 


1 1 


Corporation Taxes 


22, 105. 


78 


Reimbursement Publicly Owned Land 


70. 


52 


Old Age Tax (Meals) 


3, 623. 


78 


Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise 


210, 202. 


00 


License s 


4, 000. 


00 


Special Assessments 


2, 386. 


00 


General Government 


4, 735. 


00 


Protection of Persons and Property 


3,981. 


00 


Health and Sanitation 


2, 223. 


00 


Charitie s 


37, 255. 


00 


Old Age Assistance 


21, 255. 


00 


Veterans' Services 


20, 494. 


00 


Schools 


45, 594. 


00 


Libraries 


589. 


25 


Cemeterie s 


4, 133. 


00 


Interest on Taxes and Assessments 


6, 540. 


00 


State Assistance for School Construction 


113, 274. 


41 


Farm Animal Excise 


263. 


00 


Sewer Rental 


14, 014. 


00 


Misc . 


2, 121. 


00 



Total Estimated Receipts 



702, 464. 85 



\ 

6 
J 

I 

0' 



*3 



Over Estimates previous years to be used as Avail. Funds 
Voted from Available Funds 
Total Available Funds 

Total Estimated Receipts & Available Funds 
Net Amount to be Raised by Taxation 



24, 944. 40 
212, 795. 38 
237, 739. 78 



940, 204. 63 
1, 932, 921. 93 



Personal Property 1, 554, 025 @ $34. 50 per M 

Real Estate 54,265,625 @ 34. 50 per M 

Polls 3, 572 @ 2. 00 each 

Total Taxes Levied on Polls and Property 



53, 613. 86 
1, 872, 164. 07 
7, 144. 00 
1, 932, 921. 93 



Items not entering into the determination of the Tax Rate : 

1. Betterment and Special Assessments added to taxes: 

a. Street Betterments and Interest 

b. Water Betterments and Interest 

2. Water Liens added to Taxes 

Total 

11 



1, 354. 95 
6, 929. 1 1 
6, 990. 34 
15, 274. 40 



Town Collector 



Prior Commitments : 
Poll 

Personal Property 
Real Estate 
Farm Excise 
Motor Vehicle Excise 

Current Commitments: 
Poll 

Personal Property- 
Real Estate 
Farm Excise 
Motor Vehicle Excise 

Betterments: 



Balances 
12/31/61 



5 444. 00 
6, 313. 80 
95, 628. 41 
97. 07 
47, 615. 66 



1962 
C ommitme nt s 



(1961) 14,655.77 



7, 182. 00 
53, 61 3. 86 
L, 872, 164. 07 
293. 29 
242, 378. 1 1 



1962 
Collections 



144. 00 
4, 615. 07 
66, 244. 83 
73. 44 
43, 637. 62 



5, 962. 00 
50, 657. 73 
1,718, 251. 46 
293. 29 
195, 917. 61 



Prior Commitments: 
Water 

Committed Interest 



Street 

Committed Interest 

Water Liens 

Current Commitments: 
Water 

Committed Interest 
Street 

Committed Interest 
Water Liens 

Unapportioned Water and Street 

Interest and Costs 
TOTAL 



798. 94 
720. 47 

159. 01 
1 1 1. 64 

1, 778. 29 



3, 145. 70 



7, 827. 38 
2, 651. 20 

2, 196. 16 
533. 20 

6, 990. 34 

104, 500. 61 
(Balance to be apportioned) 



576. 41 
554. 68 

159. 01 
1 1 1. 64 

1, 179. 98 



7, 008. 35 
2, 096. 12 

2, 117. 58 
485. 52 

5, 321. 93 

12, 679. 52 

5, 580. 34 
$2, 123, 668. 13 



Lien Certificates 



Advertising Charges 



1, 160. 00 
25. 00 



12 



Water & Sewer Department 



Water Supply: 

The new Chestnut Street Pumping Station was completed and in operation on June 12, 1962; however, the full 
efficiency was not attained until the 12" main was installed on Butters Row. Water was turned on at 
6. 30 p. m. , July 30, 1962. On August 6, 1962, a total of 3, 256, 500 gallons were consumed. This amount 
would not have been available without the new Chestnut Street Wellfield or the connection on Butters Row. 

A review of the pumping statistics below indicates that further development of wellfields and pumping stat- 
ions is necessary in order to provide for the constantly increasing demand. 



1958 



1959 



1960 



1961 



1962 



Maximum gallons 
pumped per Day 



1, 850, 600 2, 089, 100 



2, 246, 300 



2, 355, 000 



3, 256, 500 



Maximum gallons 
pumped per Week 

Maximum gallons 
pumped per Month 

Average gallons 
pumped per Day 

Average gallons 
pumped per Month 



9,731,500 14,116,700 13,213,000 15,850,600 18,851,300 



38,549,000 56,948,300 48,168,900 59,703,400 64,982,900 



1,081,700 1,590,785 



1, 420, 000 



1, 546, 243 



1, 821, 733 



32,902,000 48,386,422 43,278,200 47,031,558 55,411,058 



Total gallons 
pumped per Year 



394,824,800 580,637,300 519,387,200 564,378,700 664,932,700 



sewer: 

Ihree sewer connections were made on Woburn Street. 
Miscellaneous Information: 



Metered Services 
Unmetered Services 
Total 



3, 175 
59 
3, 234 



New Hydrants Installed 
New Services Installed 
New Meters Installed 



16 
141 
141 



13 



Water Main Extensions: 



The following installations were made: 

Under the Betterment Program: 



Street 



12" Main 



8" Main 



6" Main 



Cunningham Street 
Shady Lane Drive 
Massachusetts Avenue 
Hopkins Street 
Dorchester Street 
Marcia Road 
Butters Row 



1, 280' 
786' 

160' 
2, 272' 
1, 058' 



541' 



3,411' 



By Builders and Developers: 



Lloyd Road 
Cedar Crest Road 
Hathaway Road 
Evans Drive 
First Street 
Roberts Road 



1, 072' 
500' 



149' 
90' 

784' 

250' 



-Photograph on Cover - NEW CHESTNUT STREET PUMPING ST AT ION - 
Pumping Capacity in Excess of One Million Gallons per Day 

Cost to the Town of Wilmington approximately $90, 000. 00 including land 

One Million Gallons per day capacity has cost some communities upwards 
of One Million Dollars according to Consulting Engineers 



14 



REGULATIONS FOR THE USE OF CONNECTIONS AND DRAINS ENTERING COMMON SEWERS 



No person, firm or corporation shall discharge or cause or allow to be discharged any substances or 
wastes containing caustic lime in excess of seventy-five parts per million by weight into any municipal 
sewer or any sewer or any sewer serving as a tributary thereto. 

No person, firm or corporation shall discharge or cause or allow to be discharged any substances or 
wastes containing unsaponified greasy or fatty matters in excess of three hundred parts per million by 
weight into any municipal sewer or any sewer serving as a tributary thereto. 

No person, firm or corporation shall discharge or cause or allow to be discharged any substances or 
wastes containing suspended solids in excess of five hundred parts per million by weight into any muni- 
cipal sewer or any sewer serving as a tributary thereto. 

No sewage, whether industrial or domestic, which causes or would ultimately cause a detrimental 
effect on the materials of which the municipal sewerage system is constructed or which would interrupt 
or retard its free and continuous flow, will be permitted. 

No person, firm or corporation shall discharge or cause or allow to be discharged any substances or 
wastes containing free mineral acids in amounts which the Board of Water and Sewer Commissioners 
determines to be excessive. 

No exhaust from steam engines nor blowoff from boilers shall be connected with, and no surface water, 
groundwater or cellar floor drainage, roof drainage, gasoline, explosive fluids or any substance which 
may be liable to injure the sewers or interfere with any of its uses, shall be discharged into the muni- 
cipal sewerage system. 



The Board of Water and Sewer Commissioners may, at any time, require such grease traps or venti- 

4 

L 





lating pipes to be installed as it may deem necessary for the proper maintenance of a particular sewer 



or of the common sewers. In every case where any restaurant, boarding-house, hotel, or business of 
a similar nature is carried on which provides for preparing and/or serving food for twenty or more 
persons, a suitable grease trap must be installed. In every case where any garage or other establish- 
ment where gasoline is used and which is connected to the common sewer, a suitable trap or separator 
must be installed. Grease traps, traps and separators must be kept in good condition and shall be 
cleaned frequently. Grease, oil, etc. from traps and separators shall be disposed of in an approved 
manner, and not into the municipal sewerage system. 

3 

8. Before industrial wastes may be entered into the municipal sewer system, permission to do so must 

first be obtained from the Board of Water and Sewer Commissioners which may require pre-entry treat- £ 
ment of the industrial wastes before the same are entered into the municipal sewer system. E 

9. The Board of Water and Sewer Commissioners may, at any time, direct any person, firm or corpora- 
tion to provide, within a time limit to be set by the Board of Water and Sewer Commissioners, measur- 
ing devices or other means of measuring the flow of sewage drainage, substances or waste from the 
same; these devices to be in accordance with the requirements of the Board of Water and Sewer Com- 
missioners and the records of flow from such measuring devices shall be furnished to the Board of 
Water and Sewer Commissioners upon request therefor. 

10. Any person, firm or corporation violating any such rule or regulation shall be punished by a fine of not 
less than twenty dollars nor more than five hundred dollars for each violation. 

These Rules and Regulations may be altered or amended from time to time. 

Board of Water & Sewer Commissioners 



1 5 



Town Councel 



In accordance with the requirements of the Town By-laws, I submit herewith my report as 
Town Counsel covering the year 1962. 

A. On January 1, 1962, there were pending the following actions by or against the Town 
(exclusive of actions in which the Town was merely summoned as trustee, and in which it had no interest, 
and of tax lien foreclosure proceedings in the Land Court): 

City of Lowell v. Town of Wilmington, District Court of Lowell. (Action of contract by City 
of Lowell to recover the sum of $275. 96 for special vocational training of certain pupils. ) 

City of Lowell v. Town of Wilmington, District Court of Lowell. (Action of contract by City 
of Lowell to recover $657. 77 plus interest for aid furnished in a public welfare case. ) 

City of Lowell v. Town of Wilmington, District Court of Lowell. (Action of contract by City 
of Lowell to recover $721. 90 for aid furnished in a public welfare case. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. A Certain Defendant, Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex. 
(Action of contract under G. L. Chap. 117, Sec. 5. ) 

Jacob Levine &c Sons v. Town of Wilmington, Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex. 
(Action of contract to recover burial expense. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. Edward N. Gadsby et als, Commissioners of Department of Public 
Utilities and Boston and Maine Railroad Company, Supreme Judicial Court, Suffolk County. (Petition to 
review certain rulings and orders of the Department of Public Utilities in connection with protection at the 
Middlesex Avenue Grade Crossing of the Boston and Maine Railroad. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. Julia Godzyk, Administratrix of the Estate of Andrew Klebasz, Fourth 
District Court of Eastern Middlesex. (Action of contract to recover amounts expended by the Town for 
support and hospital treatment of decedent. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. Wendell Phillips, Middlesex Probate Court. Removed to Fourth Dis- 
trict Court of Eastern Middlesex. (Petition to enforce obligation to support. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. Irving L. White, Middlesex Probate Court. (Petition to enforce obli- 
gation to support. ) 

Wilmington Board of Health v. Nagel Stone, Middlesex Superior Court . (Bill in equity to en- 
join occupancy of substandard dwelling. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. Joseph DeCota, Jr. Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex. 
(Proceeding to enforce obligation to support. ) 

New England Gas Products Inc. v. Board of Appeal, Middlesex Superior Court. (Three sepa 
rate appeals from refusal of building permit. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Middlesex Superior Court. (Petitio 
for assessment of damages for taking for state highway. ) 

16 



Town of Wilmington v. Stephen P, Hathaway et als, Middlesex Superior Court. (Bill in equity 
to enjoin removal of sand and gravel. ) 



Paul Bongiorno et ux v. County of Middlesex and Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior 
Court. (Petition for assessment of damages for land taking. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. William Baldwin et als, Middlesex Superior Court. (Bill in equity to 
enjoin removal of sand and gravel. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Middlesex Superior Court. (Petition 
for assessment of damages for land taking. ) 

John J. and Mary T. Hayes v. County of Middlesex, Middlesex Superior Court. (Petition for 
assessment of damages for land taking. ) 

City of Boston v. Town of Wilmington, Boston Municipal Court. 1959 case. (Action to recover 
for hospital care for resident of Wilmington. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. Allick Epstein, Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex. (Proceed- 
ing to enforce obligation to support. ) 

John McSheffrey et ux, Petitioners, v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court. 
(Petition for assessment of damages for land taking. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. Citizens Trust Co. , Middlesex Superior Court. (Action to recover 
deposit securing bid for kitchen equipment at new North School. ) 

Minot Anderson et al v. Louis E. Gage et als, Board of Appeals, Middlesex Superior Court. 
(Appeal from decision of the Board of Appeals denying application for variance. ) 

Curtis H. Ward v. County of Middlesex, Middlesex Superior Court. (Petition for assessment 
of damages for land taking. ) 

City of Boston v. Town of Wilmington, Boston Municipal Court. 1961 case. (Action to recover 
for hospital care. ) 

Millard Pipes et al v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court. (Petition for assess- 
ment of damages for land taking. ) 

Bessie Cohen, d/b/a Wilmington Grain Co. v. Board of Appeal, Middlesex Superior Court. 
(Appeal from denial by Board of Appeal of application for variance. ) 

B. (1) During the year 1962, the following new actions were brought by or on behalf of the 

Town: 

Town of Wilmington v. Arthur Hatton, Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex . (Action to 
recover damages to fire truck. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. Fidelity & Deposit Co. of Maryland and Anthony Signore, Suffolk 
Superior Court. (Action to recover on bond for completion of streets in subdivision. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. Ralph Kempton, Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex. (Action 
to enforce liability to support. ) 

B. (2) During the year 1962, the following new actions were brought against the Town or 
its officers or agents: 



17 



TOWN COUNSEL: 



Arthur R. Smith et al v. County of Middlesex, Middlesex Superior Court. (Petition for 
damages for land taking. Town admitted as a party defendant on motion. ) 

William G. O'Leary et al v. County of Middlesex, Middlesex Superior Court. (Petition for 
damages for land taking. Town admitted as a party defendant on motion. ) 

John J. Pyne et al v. County of Middlesex, Middlesex Superior Court. (Petition for damages 
for land taking. Town admitted as a party defendant on motion. ) 

John J. Nitchie et al v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court. (Petition for damag< 
for land taking. ) 

Beatrice G. Swenson v. Town of Wilmington et al, Middlesex Superior Court. (Petition for 
damages for land taking. ) 

Lillian M. Galvin v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court. (Petition for damages 
for land taking. ) 

Richard Donahue v. Town of Wilmington et al, Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex. 
(Action to recover damages for blasting. ) 

Sydney E. Graves, Administrator, v. Town of Wilmington et al, Middlesex Superior Court. 
(Action to recover damages for death. ) 

Paul N. Carpenter v. Town of Wilmington et al, Middlesex Superior Court . (Action to recovf 
for damages to property from fire. ) 

Minot J. Anderson et ux v. Town of Wilmington, Land Court. (Petition to invalidate zoning 

by-law. ) 

C. During the year 1962, the following actions by or against the Town were finally disposed c 

City of Boston v. Town of Wilmington, Boston Municipal Court, 1959 case. (Disposed of by 
settlement; $300. 00 paid to Boston for hospital care. ) 

City of Boston v. Town of Wilmington, Boston Municipal Court, 1961 case. (Disposed of by 
settlement, $323. 00 paid to Boston for hospital care. ) 

John McSheffrey et ux, Petitioners, v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court . 
(Disposed of by agreed settlement, $1200. 00. ) 

Curtis H. Ward v. County of Middlesex, Middlesex Superior Court. (County settled case and 
agreed to judgment for $2000. 00 damages without consulting Town. ) 

Millard Pipes et al v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court. (Case tried before 
jury, which awarded $7500. 00 damages, and judgment satisfied. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. Ralph Kempton, Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex . (Dispos 
of by final decree in favor of Town ordering monthly payments. ) 

Paul Bongiorno et ux v. County of Middlesex and Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior 
Court. (Disposed of by agreement for judgment for the petitioners in the sum of $1200. 00, and judgment 
satisfied. ) 



18 



D. Compensation was received by the Town Counsel in said matters and m all other matters 
during the year, as follows: 

Compensation $3395. 00, less discount of $93. 33, to conform 

to appropriations $3,301.67 
Disbursements 198.33 



$3, 500. 00 

(The above amounts were entirely on account of services rendered and disbursements paid in the calendar 
year 1961. ) 

Respectfully submitted, 

Philip B. Buzzell 
Town Counsel 



Sarah D. J. Carter Lecture Fund 



Dn April 7, 196Z, the Carter Lecture Committee presented to the people of Wilmington, John Roberts, 
iccomplished and talented film reporter, with his latest travelogue "Holland and the Amazing Dutch. " The 
Auditorium of the High School was filled to capacity, and the audience was most enthusiastic. 



Treasurer's Report 



Receipts 




Expenditures 




Cash on hand 1/1/62 


$200. 34 


Handley Management 


$250. 00 






Janitor 


10. 00 


Received from Trustee of 




Projectionist 


5. 00 


Trust Funds 


200. 00 


Police Officer 


8. 00 






Printing, Publicity - Town Crier 


37. 00 


Interest 


6. 49 


Postage 


. 75 




$406. 83 




$310. 75 



Cash on hand 1/1/63 $96.08 



19 



Planning Board 



General Planning: 

Review of the Zoning By-law was continued during 1962 to keep it up-to-date and insure the health, safety, 
and welfare of the inhabitants of Wilmington through sound and orderly growth. Recognizing that the Town 
is now experiencing rapid residential, industrial, and commercial growth, particular attention was directec 
to the study of: 

1. Proper balance between residential, business, and industrial growth. 

2. Available area zoned as Industrial District and its potential for development. 

3. Advisability of providing permissive zoning for garden-type apartments and motels. 

4. Present and future need for open space, green strips, parks, and recreation areas. 

Zoning: 

Five articles pertaining to amendment of the Zoning Map were processed for Town Meeting action. Public 
hearings were held by the Board in accordance with zoning regulations, and recommendations were made t 
the Town Meetings. 

Plot Plans: 

Approximately sixty plot plans were reviewed by the Board, and forty-six approved as component parts of 
a subdivision or as not constituting a subdivision. All such plans of land must be checked carefully and 
signed by the Planning Board in order to be recorded at the Registry. 

Subdivision: 

A preliminary plan of "Jackson Heights", a subdivision of about thirty lots, was received in April and, 
after minor modification, approved. A definitive plan for this subdivision was presented in August and 
approved after due consideration. A definitive plan was also approved for an extension of the Esquire 
Estates subdivision. Public hearings were held relative to both. 

Two preliminary subdivision plans, Northfield I and Northfield II, comprised of about one hundred and 
seventy-five lots, were submitted to the Planning Board but were not approved. Further action is antici- 
pated in regard to these plans. 

Three previously approved subdivisions came before the Board for further action to allow additional develoj 
ment. 



20 



Parks and Recreation: 



The Planning Board, as the Board of Park Commissioners, continued to provide improvements at Silver 
Lake Beach by providing sand, enlarging the beach area, and constructing bicycle parking stands. It is 
hoped that a portion of the general beach area will be loamed and seeded as an improvement during 1963. 



General: 

In addition to its regular meetings the second and fourth Tuesdays each month, the Planning Board conducted 
several public meetings relative to zoning and subdivision control. It met with other Boards, Committees, 
and civic groups on many occasions, and maintained particularly close liaison with the Permanent Building 
Committee and Board of Appeals. 

The full co-operation of Town Officials, Boards and invididuals throughout the year is gratefully acknow- 
ledged by the Planning Board. 



Recreation Commission 



k 
A 

The Recreation Commission has attempted to meet the challenge as presented by a wide range in ages and 
interests of our townspeople. To do this, a diversified program intended to suit the needs both of spec- - 
tators and of participants has been offered. 5 



The younger citizens have been offered supervised playground activities which are conducted in four areas 
of the Town throughout the summer months. During the winter months, the boys in this group may take part 
in the indoor program of gym and basketball activities. 



The men of the Town are invited to take part in the adult Softball activities as offered at the Town Park on 

weekday evenings throughout the summer months. Also, they may take part in the winter indoor program 

of gym and basketball activities with special attention given to golf instruction. £ 

i 

The ladies have not been forgotten and have been active in a winter program similar to that offered to the 
!nen, one night a week. 

Persons of all ages are invited to take advantage of the facilities and services of the Town Beach at Silver 
Lake. Emphasis is stressed on protection of life and leisure time bathing. The interest in the area of 
swimming lessons has become so great that for the first time in years classes had to be cut because of a 
ack of personnel. 

This year for the first time we are attempting to organize PEE-WEE Ice Hockey. This will be conducted 
I >y volunteer workers. 

|Ve are grateful to the members of the School Committee and to the Planning Board for making our program 
sossible. 



Zl 



Police Department 



ARREST 



Affray 


8 


Other Departments ( Warrants) 


5 


Ar son 


1 


Open and Gross Lewdness 


1 


Assault and Battery- 


24 


Possession of Loaded Rifle in Vehicle 


1 


Assault and Battery with Dangerous Weapon 


c 


Peeping Tom 


•> 


Being Abroad at Night 




Receiving Stolen Property 


•> 

L 


Breaking and Entering 




R unaway 


L 




Concealing Leased Property 


1 


Stubborn Child 


2 


Disturbing the Peace 


n 

1 


Suspicious Person 


40 


Dr unkenne s s 


Q C 


T r e spas sing 


i 


Evasion of Fare 


i 


Unlawful Killing oi Dog 


1 


Illegitimacy 


1 


Unnatural Act 


1 


Indecent Exposure 


1 


Violation of Air Rifle Law 


£ 


Insane 


5 


Violation of Federal Code (F. B. I. ) 


1 


Juvenile Delinquency 


63 


Violation of Fireworks Law 


4 


Ear c eny 


C 


Violation of Immigration Laws (Federal) 


1 


Malicious Damage 


14 


Violation of Pornography Law 


1 


Non Support 


23 


Violation of Probation 


2 






363 


ARREST FOR 


MOTOR 


VEHICLE VIOLATIONS 




Auto Thefts 


6 


Loaning License 


1 


Allowing Improper Ferson to Operate 


1 


Operating So As To Endanger 


4 


Attaching Wrong Plates 


2 


Operating After Suspension of License 


7 


Falsifying Name and Address 


1 


Operating Under the Influence of Liquor 


8 


Failing to Display Inspection Sticker 


6 


Operating Unregistered Vehicle 


10 


Failing to Stop on Signal of Police Officer 


4 


Operating Uninsured Vehicle 


10 


Failing to Stop for School Bus 


2 


Operating Without a License 


11 


Failing to Stop for Red Light 


4 


Refusing to Produce License to Officer 


1 


Failing to Stop at Stop Sign 




Speeding 


22 


Leaving Scene of Accident 


4 


Using Motor Vehicle without Authority 


10 








116 



Total arrests for the year show 479 126 more than in 1961. 



Total fines collected by the court show $2, 350. 00 this is $660. 00 more than in 1961. 



22 



MISCELLANEOUS ACTIVITIES 



Auto Accidents 


165 


Indecent Phone Calls Reported 


14 


Attempted Suicides 


7 


Juvenile Cases (No Court Action) 


54 


Automobiles Reported Stolen 


6 


Larcenies Reported 


126 


Buildings Broken Into 


81 


Missing Persons 


27 


Buildings Found Open (Business Places) 


128 


Prowlers Reported 


49 


Children Reported Lost 


16 


Stolen Bicycles 


18 


Complaints Received (Investigated) 


892 


Stolen Cars Recovered 


9 


Emergency Cruiser Trips 


52 


Suicide s 


1 


Fatal Automobile Accidents 


2 


Sudden Deaths 


9 


Fires Responded To 


42 


Summons Delivered 


384 


Indecent Exposures Reported 


11 







In concluding this report, my most sincere thanks and appreciation to all Town Departments for the wonder- 
ful co-operation extended this department in 1962. 

To the Town Manager and the Board of Selectmen, many thanks for their splendid support throughout the 
year . 

To the Traffic Supervisors for another year of commendable service, my most deepest thanks and apprecia- 
tion. 

To the members of the Department for their every effort to the accomplishments of the department for 1962, 
a most sincere expression of thanks and appreciation. 



E 

i 

2 

c] 

Oj 

h 
c 

I 

i 



23 



Fire Department 



The manual force consists of the Chief, three Lieutenants, and twelve Privates. There is a call force of 
fifteen members. 



The Fire Department responded to a total of eight hundred and thirty-seven (837) calls: two hundred and 
thirty-eight (238) were bell alarms, and five hundred and ninety-nine (599) were still alarms. 



Ambulance Calls 
Auto and Trucks 
Brush and Grass 
Buildings 
Chimneys 



341 
38 

262 
61 
4 



False Alarms 
Oil Burners 
Out of Town 
Service Calls 



23 
6 
8 

94 



A total of 60, 050 feet of fire hose was laid: 33, 575 feet of booster hose 7, 925 feet of 1 1/8" hose 

8, 450 feet of 1 1 /2" hose and 10, 100 feet of 2 1/2" hose. The total value of property endangered wa: 

$493, 900. 00. The property loss was $34, 513. 62. 

As required by the State, inspections were made of rest homes, schools, all public buildings, and all new 
gasoline tank locations. 

With the exception of Engine #5 which is kept at the North Wilmington Pumping Station, all equipment is in I 
good condition. I feel that serious consideration should be given to building a sub- station in the North 
Wilmington section of Town. With the building of new homes and new industrial plants in this section of 
Town in the past few years, I feel that a sub- station is a must and that Engine #5 be replaced at once. This I 
engine is considered obsolete by the Underwriters, and the home owners in this section of Town will lose 
the credit given by the Rating Bureau if something isn't done at once. 

In this year's budget, I am asking to have the ambulance replaced with a new one. The present ambulance I 
is seven years old. When you consider this is emergency equipment, I feel it has to be kept in top running 
condition, and the upkeep is going to be high to the taxpayer. 



Members of the department installed approximately three miles of fire alarm wire on the following streets: 
Lawrence Street, West Street, Woburn Street and Suncrest Avenue. Four street boxes were added to the 
system. 



Permits issued for blasting 
Permits issued for gas 



30 
46 



Permits issued for burning 
Permits issued for oil 



2125 
124 



It is with regret that I mention the retirement of Private Charles E. Ellis, Jr. ; his service will be greatly 
missed in the department. 



24 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON 



USE OF AMBULANCE 



1. The ambulance may be used to transport patients to hospitals or other destinations under the following 
circumstance s: 

a. In the case of accidents, upon request of Police Officer, or in other emergencies, to a 
destination within a 20 -mile radius of the Fire Station. 

b. When requested by a physician or dentist, resident or practicing in Wilmington, if a 
stretcher case, also within a 20-mile radius. 

c. When requested by the Board of Health, if a stretcher case, also within a 20-mile 
radius; except if in excess of 20-mile radius, only with the express permission of the 
Chairman of the Board of Selectmen or the Town Manager. Transportation of a patient 
affected with or exposed to any contagious disease is strictly prohibited. 

d. When requested by the Public Health or School Nurse upon certification of attending 
physician. 

2. Use of the ambulance shall be charged according to the following schedule: 

a. Accident cases, if recoverable by patient from insurance, Blue Cross or other agencies, 
$5. 00 plus $1. 00 per mile to destination. If patient is a resident, charge may be 
abated at the discretion of the Board of Selectmen. 

b. All other patients shall be charged a flat rate of $15. 00 per trip if to a destination 
within a 20 -mile radius of the Fire Station. ^ 

! 

3. Use of the ambulance shall not be permitted for the transportation of a patient other than from a point 
within the Town of Wilmington to the point of destination designated by the person authorizing the use 
of the ambulance. Transfer of a patient from house to hospital, or hospital to home, if a stretcher 
case, is permitted upon request of a physician resident in Wilmington. 

Ei 
h 



The ambulance shall return to the Fire Station upon completion of the delivery of the patient to point 
of destination. No waiting time shall be allowed. 

Ambulance service for transport of patients for X-rays or other examinations shall not be permitted 
except in special circumstances. 

The ambulance shall not be ordered out for ambulatory patients. 

Violent patients shall not be transported until a Police Officer or Medical Doctor is present and in 
attendance. 

The Chief of the Fire Department shall, once each week, commit to the Town Manager and Town 
Accountant a full account of the use of the ambulance, stating the name and address of person or 
persons transported, the authorizing person, the points of origin and destination, and the total mileage 
of each trip. 

The Town Accountant shall prepare and forward a bill for the amount due the Town. Facts relating tc 
insurance coverage to be obtained from the Police Officer in case of accidents, and from patient or 
family in the case of illness. 



04 



25 



7. 

8. 



USE OF AMBULANCE 

Payments should be made to the Town Collector. 

In the event of an emergency not clearly covered by these Regulations, the Chief of the Fire Depart- 
ment shall exercise his best judgment in the circumstances. 



9. These regulations shall be effective January 1, 1963. 



Per Order: 

Board of Selectmen 



Veterans' Agent 



During 1962 this Department processed Two Hundred and Forty-four (244) applications for monetary aid as 

follows: 

Chapter 115 as amended: 

96 applications were referred to other cities and towns 
46 applications were rejected 
102 applications were approved for aid totaling over $48, 000. 00 

This represents an increase in the number of cases handled. Of a total of over $48, 000. 00 spent, more 
than $15, 000. 00 was paid to hospitals; $9, 000. 00 was paid for doctors, dentists, and medication; $24, 000 
was paid to veterans, or their dependents, who were unable to work because of illness or age limitations. 
In contrast, less than $8, 000. 00 was spent on employable veterans who were temporarily out of work. This 
is an increase over the previous year. 



Through the co-operation of the Welfare Department and the Community Fund, this Department was able to 
care for a number of cases ineligible under the Veterans Benefits Law. 



With increasing medical, surgical, and hospital costs, together with very little, if any decrease in the casi 
load, it is not anticipated that future expenditures will lessen. 

I would recommend that a clerk typist be procured for this department. 



26 



Dog Officer 



Dog Licenses 

Kennels 

Dogs Confined 

Complaints Covered 

Dogs Destroyed 

Dogs Disposed Of 

Dogs Killed By Cars 

Resident Calls For Licenses 



1302 


297 
592 


214 

76 
358 



Animal Inspector 



Dog Bites Reported 

Dogs Showing Physical Signs of Rabies 

Animals Submitted to Laboratory for Examination 

(All biting animals were quarantined for the 
period of time prescribed by law. ) 
Animals Quarantined 
Animals Released from Quarantine 
Dogs Released from Interstate Shipment 
Laboratory Report: 

Positive 

Negative 

Premises Keeping Domestic Animals Inspected 

Cattle Inspected 

Horses Inspected 

Swine Inspected 

Goats Inspected 

Sheep Inspected 

Cattle Released from Interstate Shipment 
Cattle Reacting to the Tuberculin Test 



107 

4 



114 
1 14 
2 


4 
64 
110 
81 
507 
7 
11 





Oi 



All special work assigned to me by the Department of Livestock 
Disease Control and the Board of Health was attended to promptly. 



SLAUGHTERING INSPECTOR: 



No slaughtering in Town 

No calls for personal livestock slaughtering 



27 



Town Engineer 



The work load of the Engineering Department was again on the increase over the previous year, and it is 
apparent this condition will continue due to demands occasioned by the growth of the Town. 

Some of the survey work formerly performed by private engineering concerns and consultants was handled 
by this department. This included the work of bringing the water-line and main-valve locations up-to-date 
in approximately one -third the area of the Town; the survey and plans for the taking of approximately 15. 5 
acres of land in North Wilmington for a school site on the Sidelinker property off Woburn Street; and the 
survey of the perimeter and topography of the water shed area north of Route 125 near the North Reading 
and Andover Town lines. 

The department was also called upon to give lines and grades for the approaches and roads near the new 
North Intermediate School at the junction of Salem and Ballardvale Streets in North Wilmington. This also 
included the necessary plans and staking of the Cowie property in that area. 

Surveys were made and plans were prepared for five streets to be built under the Betterment Act. These 
were Pleasant Street, Marcia Road, River Street, Hamlin Lane, and Dartmouth Avenue. The first three 
roads were built during the year. Hamlin Lane was held up due to the lack of a drainage easement from 
the abutters. Dartmouth Avenue was turned down by the abutters as being too costly. 

It was decided to make the necessary surveys to extend the Massachusetts Co-ordinate System in a section 
of Town where no known co-ordinate point exists. Accordingly a traverse was run up Glen Road, Main 
Street, and Church Street. These points can now be used to extend the system still further. 

Granite stone bounds were set in some sections of Lawrence Street, Lloyd Road, Marjorie Road, the end 
of Ainsworth Road, and Boutwell Street. 

Several subdivisions became active during the year. These include Jackson Heights off Shawsheen Avenue 
Hathaway Acres Extension, Alderwood Estates, Ferguson Subdivision or Woodland Road, Esquire Estates, 
Northfield off Park Street, and one by the Wilmington Development Co. Inc. 

Street and dwelling construction have taken place in the Jackson Heights, Hathaway Acres Extension, and 
the Ferguson subdivisions, while plans were either approved or under consideration for Alderwood Estate 
and Northfield subdivision. Esquire Estates and Signore subdivision were acquired by new developers, an 
it appears that work will get underway shortly in these two areas. Only the road was built in the Wilming- 
ton Development Co. Inc. area. . 

Surveys were completed and preliminary plans drawn for the balance of Boutwell Street from the end of th« 
new pavement to Aldrich Road. 

No gravel operations took place during the year. 



28 



Building Inspector 



Building Permits were issued as follows: 



Dwellings 

Residential Garages 

Alterations and repairs to dwellings 

Industrial Buildings 
Commercial Garages 
Office Buildings 
Sheds, Barns, etc. 
Stores 

Structures, including tower and signs 
Additions and alterations to non-residential 

structure s 
Elevator 



No. 

123 
9 
58 

9 
1 
1 
5 
2 
6 

15 
1 



Valuation 

1 , 592, 270 
8, 250 
113, 630 

473, 800 
21, 500 
42, 000 
11, 550 
42, 000 

117, 250 

41, 450 
11, 500 



Totals 



1,714, 150 



761, 050 



2, 475, 200 



Renewals 
Demolition 
Fire Repairs 



27 
21 
2 

280 



As predicted in my 1961 report, the number of Building Permits for dwellings increased in 1962 because of 
the acts of the legislature over-riding the building lot requirement of the Zoning By-laws. Further, the 
average amount of total private construction per dwelling was $41, 280. 00 in 1961 ($3, 921, 425 -r 95); and 
less than half as much $20, 120. 00 in 1962 or ($2, 475, 200 -r 123). 

The State Board for the regulation of gas fitting has not (December 28, 1962) made available lists of licensed 
gas-fitters nor gas-fitting regulations. It is therefore impossible for the building department to properly 
implement the intent of the legislation and properly regulate local gas-fitting using a 1962 appropriation. 
When the State authorities make sufficient information available, this money will be expended. 



Report of fees received and turned over to the Treasurer: 



Building Permits 
Plumbing Permits 
Gas Fitting Permits 
Wiring Permits 



280 
137 

3 

346 



$1, 221. 00 

1, 016. 50 

29. 00 

2, 131. 45 
$4, 397. 95 



There was an appropriation in 1962 for secretarial assistance to the Building Inspector. One area, assemb- 
ling data for the Board of Appeals' map, was brought up-to-date. Expansion of other departments left no 
room to continue this assistance. If there is an appropriation, and when there is office room; the pro- 
/ision of a secretary, 8. 30 a.m. to 2. 30 p.m. four days per week, will enable the Building Inspector to 
"neet responsibilities now necessarily being ignored. 



29 



Board of Appeals 



The Wilmington Board of Appeals respectfully submits its Annual Report for the year 1962. The Board 
consists of Louis E. Gage, Chairman; Bruce MacDonald, Secretary; Parker E. Hodgdon, member; and 
Associate Members, Leidy K. Williams, (resigned), C. Homer Coursey, Robert Zarce, and 
William H. Cullen, (newly appointed). 

The Board reports all cases for 1962 are completed, and considerable work has been done this year to 
bring up to date all cases of previous years under the existing Zoning By — law. 

Following is the report of cases heard in 1962, the members voting, and the decision on each: 



Hearing Date 
(Advertised dates) 
Applicant 



Reason for Appeal 



Members 
Voting 



Decision 



Case #1-62 - 1/16/62 
(12/21/61 & 12/28/61) 
Arthur Jacobs 



Case #2-62 - 1/16/62 
(12/21/61 & 12/28/61) 
Henry Latta 



Case #3-62 - 1/16/62 
(12/21/61 & 12/28/61) 
Chester A. Bruce 



Case #4-62 - 1/16/62 
(12/21/61 & 12/28/61) 
Lillian Corcoran 

Case #5-62 - 2/13/62 
(1/18/62 & 1/24/62) 
Don Jon Realty Trust 



Case #6-62 - 2/13/62 
(1/18/62 & 1/25/62T) 
Thomas R. Bunker 

Case #7-62 - 3/13/62 
(2/15/62 & 2/21/62) 
Edward B. Stevens 



Variance on signs on a tailor shop on Main (LG, PH, BM) 

Street on property of B & M R. R. 
(Map 42/22) 



To divide a lot of land at Morse Avenue and (LG, PH, BM) 

Lawn Street into two lots, neither having 
required area nor frontage. 
(Map 48/10 & 11) 

To divide his land into two house lots having (LG, PH, BM) 

more than required area and depth, but in- 
sufficient frontage. ( 313 Salem Street) 
(Map 97/34) 

For a building permit on a lot of land on (LG, LW, BM) 

Harris Street, having insufficient frontage. 
(Map 30/18) 

Variance to be allowed to erect a double- (LG, LW, BM) 

faced metal sign in front on a building on 
their property at 685 Main Street. 
(Map 39/11) 

Variance in rear lot requirement on lot of (LG, LW, BM) 

land at the corner of Pine and Hobson Ave. 
(Map 45/16) 

To divide a lot of land at 195 Federal Street (LG, HC, BM) 

into two lots for the purpose of building a 

home. 

(Map 60/42) 



End signs deniec 
Roof sign facing 
front granted 
with provisions 

Granted 



Denied 



Denied 



Denied 



Granted 



Denied 



30 



Hearing Date 
(Advertised dates) 
Applicant 

Case #8-62 - 3/13/62 
(2/15/62 & 2/21/62) 
A. P. Rounds 



Case #9-62 - 3/13/62 
(2/15/62 & 2/21/62) 
William F. Butt 



Case #10-62 - 4/3/62 
(3/8/62 & 3/15/62) 
Raymond C. Booth 



Case #11-62 - 4/3/62 
(3/8/62 & 3/15/62) 
Edward J. Melanson 



Case #13-62 - 4/24/62 
(3/29/62 & 4/5/62) 
Wilson E. Rice 



Case #13-62 - 4/24/62 
(3/29/62 & 4/5/62) 
Guy T . Piscopo 



Reason for Appeal 



Variance to build five houses on Lots 18, 24, 
37, 38, and 39 Hathaway Acres Extension, 
which have insufficient depth according to 
Zoning By-law, Section V-5. 
(Map 94/41E) 

To build a dwelling on Lot 46 Lawrence St. , 
lot having sufficient frontage and area but in- 
sufficient depth as measured by Section V-5 
of the Zoning By-laws. 
(Map 80/47) 

To clear an easement and create a new 
larger lot on Morton Avenue (formerly 
Auburn Street). 
(Map 40/94) 

Variance for insufficient frontage on Lot #1 
Harris Street. (Property owned by 
Lillian E. Corcoran). 
(Map 30/18B) 

Variance to build on six lots having in- 
sufficient depth and area on Hobson and 
Dewey Streets. 
(Map 45 / 1 & 2) 

To divide parcel into three building sites, 
but not having required depth or area at 
the corner of Grove Avenue and Burnap St. 
(Map 34/102) 



Member s 
Voting 



Deci si on 



(LG, HC, BM) 



(LG, HC, BM) 



Granted with 
pr ovi sions 



Approved with 
r e strictions 



(LG, PH) Granted 

John R . Evans 

sworn in for this meeting 



(LG, PH, BM) Denied 



(BM, PH) 
H. Nickerson 
sworn in for 
this meeting 

(BM , PH) 
H. Nickerson 
sworn in for 
this meeting 



Part granted, 
Part granted 
with revisions 



Division into 3 
lots denied. 
Division into 2 
lots approved on 
conditions. 



Case #14-62 - 5/8/62 
(4/12/62 & 4/19/62) 
Samuel Yentile 

Case #15-62 - 5/8/62 
(4/12/62 & 4/19/62) 
Jackson Brothers 

Case #16-62 - 5/8/62 
(4/12/62 & 4/19/62) 
Anthony J. Triglione 
Suppliers Auto Parts 

Case #17-62 - 5/8/62 
(4/12/62 & 4/19/62) 



Variance on Lot C Lowell Street not having (LG, HC, BM) 

the required frontage. 
(Map 39/3) 

Variance in the side yards of four lots of (LG, HC, BM) 

land on Marcia Road . 

(Maps 78/43 & 46 and 86/19 and 20) 

Variance to have less parking than required (LG, BM, HC) 
for retail business on a lot at Middlesex 
Avenue and Main Street. 
(Map 42/30) 

Variance to build a garage closer to the lot (LG, PH, BM) 

line than the law allows. Bridge Lane. 



Denied 



Granted with 
provisions 



Granted - 
Parking for 12 
cars. Restricted 
to present owner. 

Granted 



Joseph & Adele Austras (Map 32/126G) 



31 




Hearing Date 
(Advertised dates) 
Applic ant 

Case #18-62 - 5/15/62 
(4/19/62 & 4/26/62) 
Helen C. Syvertson 



Case #19-62 - 5/15/62 
(4/19/62 & 4/26/62) 
Joseph F. and Eleanor 
Mello 

Case #20-62 - 6/5/62 
(5/10/62 & 5/17/62) 
Garnet Mills 
(Thomas R. Bunker) 



Case #21-62 - 6/5/62 
(5/10/62 & 5/17/62) 
Generoso Capodulupo 



Case #22-62 - 6/12/62 
(5/24/62 & 5/31./62) 
Sam Grant 



Case #23-62 - 6/12/62 
(5/24/62 & 5/31/62) 
Henry R . Hesse 



Case #24-62 - 6/26/62 
(6/7/62 & 6/14/62) 
Wilmington Develop- 
ment Company, Inc. 



Reason for Appeal 



To obtain a building permit on lot approxi- 
mately the same as others in vicinity not 
having regulation frontage, area, nor 
depth. Morse & Bellview Avenue. 
(Map 48/3) 

Permit to build a garage on an irregular 
lot closer to lot line than the law allows. 
Lockwood Road. 
(Map 97/10) 

Variance on Lot 22 Westdale Avenue to erect 
a single residence home on a lot not having 
required depth, frontage nor area, but con- 
forming in size to other lots on the street. 
(Map 73/47) 

For a variance at 168 Main Street to allow 
establishment of a real estate business in 
a house at that location. 
(Map 44/186) 

For a variance to erect a sign 4' x 6' on 
property at 287 Main Street, in a General 
Business District. 
(Map 43/1) 

Variance to divide his house lot into two lots, 
neither having sufficient area, frontage or 
depth. 

(Map 71/23) 

Variance to increase limited industrial 
parking area into a residential zone. 
(Map 88/3 1A> 



Members 
Voting 



Deci sion 



(LG, PH, HC) 



(LG, PH, BM) 



(LG, LW, BM) 



(BM, PH, LW) 



(LG, PH, BM) 



(LG, PH, BM) 



(LG, BM, PH) 



Denied 



Granted 



Granted with 
pr ovi sions 



Denied 



No one at all 
appeared. No 
decision. 



Denied 



Denied . 
Granted temp, 
use - 90 days - 
parking 65' into 
SRA with pro- 
visions 



Case #25-62 - 7/10/62 
(6/21/62 & 6/28/62) 
Mrs. Guiseppe Dini 



To divide an existing lot at Shady Lane Drive 
and Sprucewood Road into two lots, neither 
having sufficient frontage or area. 
(Map 80/33) 



(LG, PH, LW) 



Denied 



Case #26-62 - 7/10/62 
(6/21/62 & 6/28/62) 
Charles River Breeding (Map R2-5) 
Laboratories 



To extend the present operation into 4 acres 
adjoining the present operation. 



Case #27-62 - 7/10/62 
(6/28/62 & 7/5/62) 
Rizirio & Mary E. Elia 



For a variance to allow for the erection of 
two homes at 120 Faulkner Ave. on lots not 
having sufficient frontage, depth or area. 
(Map 69/24) 



(LG, PH, LW) 



(LG, PH, BM) 



Permitted 



Denied 



32 



Hearing Date 
(Advertised dates) 
Applicant 

Case #28-62 - 7/31/62 
(7/12/62 & 7/19/62) 
Dennis & Joy Canelas 



Case #29-62 - 7/31/62 
(7/12/62 & 7/19/62) 
Mrs. Ernest Bousfield 

Case #30-62 - 8/21/62 
(8/2/62 & 8/9/62) 
Dominic Cacciola 



Case #31-62 - 8/21/62 
(8/2/62 & 8/9/62) 
John F. Comeau 



Case #32-62 - 9/11/62 
(8/23/62 & 8/31/62) 
Samuel Yentile 



Case #33-62 - 9/11/62 
(8/23/62 & 8/31/62) 
Carl Butler 



Case #34-62 - 9/18/62 
(9/6/62 & 9/13/62) 
Joseph Fortunata 

Case #35-62 - 9/18/62 
(9/6/62 & 9/13/62) 
Jerry A. Masella 



Case #36-62 - 9/18/62 
(9/6/62 & 9/13/62) 
Alan E. Fenton 



Reason for Appeal 



To divide a lot of land on MacDonald Road 
into two lots, having insufficient frontage, 
area and depth. 
(Map 84/38 & 46) 

To erect a home on a lot on Ferguson Road 
having required frontage but insufficient 
depth. 

For a variance to divide his land at 1 1 Lawn 
Street into two lots, having required depth 
and area, but one with less than the required 
frontage . 
(Map 48/9) 

To divide two lots of land owned by Pierino 
Dizio on Dadant Drive into four lots, each 
with 100 feet frontage. 
(Map 78/12) 

For a variance to allow a dwelling to be built 
on Lots B & C, Lowell Street, the combined 
lots having sufficient frontage but insufficient 
depth and area. 
(Map 39/3 & 3A) 

To make two building lots on Andover Street 
having sufficient frontage and area, but in- 
sufficient depth, according to Section V-5. 
(Map 103/15) 

Variance to divide a one -family house into 
a two-family dwelling. 108 Church Street. 
(Map 52/12) 

For a variance to allow for the erection of 
a room and garage closer to the lot line than 
the law allows. 5 Walker Street. 
(Map 55/239) 

For a variance on land owned by John and 
Josephine Vadaike on Dartmouth Street to 
erect a one -family house in a General 
Business Zone, according to Section IV-2 
of the Zoning Law, on a lot having required 
area and frontage but insufficient depth. 
(Map 40/166) 



Members 
Voting 



Decision 



(PH, LW, HC) 



(HC, LW, PH) 



(LG, BM, PH) 



(LG, BM, PH) 



(LG, PH, BM) 



(LG, PH, BM) 



(LG, PH, BM) 



(LG, PH, BM) 



(LG, PH, BM) 



Approved with 
conditions 



Granted Lot A 



Granted with 
provi sions 



Denied as re- 
quested, but 
partial variance 
granted. 

Granted 



Granted one lot 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Case #37-62 - 10/23/62 For a variance to build a home on a lot with- 
(10/4/62 & 10/11/62) out the required frontage on Chestnut Street. 
Ethel Clinch (Map 16/1) 



(LG, PH, BM) 



Denied 



33 



Hearing Date 

(Advertised dates) 
Applicant 

Case #38-62 - 10/23/62 
(10/4/62 & 10/11/62) 
Edward Tessier 



Case #39-62 - 10/30/62 
(10/11/62 b 10/18/62) 
Ralph Kelmon 



Reason for Appeal 



For the right to build a garage on land of 
Arthur Elfman, Morse Avenue, closer to the 
lot line than the law allows. 
(Map 48/16) 

To build a garage closer to the lot line than 
the law allows at 156 Middlesex Avenue. 
(Map 66/2) 



Members 
Voting 



Decision 



Case #40-62 - 10/30/62 To subdivide a lot of land owned by Cora 



(10/11/62 & 10/18/62) 
Robert Belbin 



Case #41-62 - 10/30/62 
(10/11/62 & 10/18/62) 
Alan Fenton 



Faulkner, 224 Shaw sheen Avenue, with a 
garage closer to the lot line than the law 
allows. 
(Map 21/2) 

To erect a dwelling on a lot of land having 
insufficient frontage on Dexter Street 
(formerly Carter) and owned by estate of 
Gertrude MacDonald. 
(Map 55/231) 



Case #42-62 - 1 1/6/62 For a variance to allow for the establish- 



(10/18/62 & 10/25/62) 
Wilmington Develop- 
ment Company 



Case #43-62 - 11/27/62 
(11/8/62 & 11/15/62) 
Jackson Brothers 

Case #44-62 - 11/27/62 
(11/8/62 & 11/15/62) 
Everett MacKay 



ment of a lot line between two buildings 
leaving less than required sideyard. 
353 Middlesex Avenue. 
(Map 79/31) 

For permission to erect a 4' x 6' sign at 
540 Main Street. 
(Map 41/129) 

To make an addition to a non-conforming 
dwelling at 12 Newland Avenue. 
(Map 32/64) 



Case #45-62 - 11/27/62 To build on lots in Jackson Heights off 



(11/8/62 & 11/15/62) 
Jackson Brothers 



Shawsheen Avenue having required front- 
age and area, but insufficient depth, 
according to Section V-5, Zoning By-laws. 
(Map 21/4 & 5) 



Case #46-62 - 12/18/62 For an authorization to allow construction 
(11/31/62 & 12/6/62) and operation of a ski-tow lift, off 
Garden of Eden Country Chestnut Street. 
Club, Inc. (Map 2/23) 

Case #47-62 - 12/18/62 To build a private garage with less than 
(11/31/62 & 12/6/62) required sideyard allowed by Zoning By- 
Frederick Seddon law. 

(Map 81/44) 



(LG, PH, BM) 



(LG, PH, BM) 



(LG, PH, BM) 



(LG, BM, PH) 



Granted 



Granted 



Denied as re- 
quested but 
granted vari- 
ance as to 
Section V-5 

Granted 



(LG, PH, BM) 



Granted 



(LG, PH, BM) 



(LG, PH, BM) 



(LG, BM, PH) 



Denied 



Granted 



Granted 



(LG, PH, BM) 



(LG, PH, BM) 



Granted 



Granted 



34 



Hearing Date 
(Advertised dates) 
Applicant 



Reason for Appeal 



Members 
Voting 



Case #48-62 - 12/18/62 For a variance in the Zoning By-law to allow (LG, PH, BM) 



Decision 



Denied 



(11/21/62 & 12/6/62) 
Lloyd W. Belbin 



Case #49-62 - 12/18/62 
(11/31/62 & 12/6/62) 
Albert D. Russo 



for the erection of a dwelling on a lot on 
Bellevue Avenue not having required frontage, 
depth nor area. 
(Map 48/2) 

To build a dwelling at 22 6 Shaw sheen Avenue 
on a lot having required frontage and area 
but insufficient depth as required by Zoning 
law s . 

(Map 21/3A) 



(LG, PH, BM) 



Granted 



Members Voting: 

LG - Louis E. Gage, Chairman 
BM - Bruce MacDonald, Secretary 
PH - Parker E. Hodgdon 
HC - C. Homer Coursey 
LW - Leidy K. Williams 



i 
i 

j 

"< 

0' 

El 

11; 
I 

I 
I 

I 
I 



',5 



Highway Department 



As in the past, all regular routine work before my general highway program begins was accomplished such 
as patching, cleaning catch basins, culverts, and cutting back shoulders and hauling away the dirt. 

Graveled, graded, and rolled all the roadway in the Cemetery and supervised the laying of hot top by a 

contractor Graveled, graded, and rolled a driveway and parking area at the Walker School and 

supervised the laying of hot top by a contractor on this project All the subsoil and fine fill exca- 
vated from various highway jobs was hauled and dumped in the cemetery and spread in the proper location, 

thereby making almost a new section which will require loaming before the lots are saleable 

Laid two hot top walks at the High School, and laid two large hot top. ramps leading into the football field. . . 
....... Helped lay 3, ZOO feet granite curb along Middlesex Avenue and Church Street and back-filled same 

with loam. 

Removed the old cement walk on Middlesex Avenue from its beginning at the cemetery to Wildwood Street, 

back-filled same with gravel and rolled before the contractor laid the hot top Removed all the old 

hot top from the sidewalks at the Square, back-filled with gravel and rolled before contractor laid the hot 

top. The short section by the Banks was left because it was in good condition Widened Church 

Street from the hardware store to the culvert and hot topped it. Laid asphalt curb in the gutter of this 
widening to control the water into the catch basins. 

Constructed a sidewalk on Middlesex Avenue from Coombs Furniture Warehouse to High Street. Sidewalk 
was hot topped and asphalt curb laid in the gutter to control the flow of surface water into a catch basin. . . ; I 

Completed Marcus Road as to betterment specifications Installed 350 feet of pipe, 6 catch 

basins, and one manhole on Walker Street to eliminate a bad water condition. After this drainage was in- 
stalled, I hot topped the entire length of the street because the grades were so fine it had to be done to make 

sure the water problem was eliminated Laid 200 feet of hot top on Marjorie Road to eliminate 

another bad water condition in the street Graveled the end of Lloyd Road to comply with its accept 

ance Hot topped the roadway into the Town Garage, the area in front, and two small areas on the 

side Paid $1, 300. 00 to a contractor using a stump saw to cut the stumps 1Z to 16 inches below the 

ground surface along the highways. This project was supervised by the Tree Warden. His men picked up 
all the chips and back-filled the holes. About one hundred and twenty-five stumps were removed this way. 

Betterment Streets: 
Hamlin Lane: 

This street was not started because of a water problem. Drainage had to be installed to eliminate a large 
puddle about 75 feet long and the width of the street. It could not be piped and drained to the end of the 
street and dumped into the swamp because of the elevation. No abutter in its immediate vicinity would give 
an easement to the Town to run the water through his property. Drainage was and still is the only way to 
eliminate the water problem. 

River Street: 

This street is completed insofar as the street itself is concerned. One catch basin was installed, and a 
length of pipe laid towards the swamp. An easement was obtained in November giving the Town the right to 
lay pipe across private property to the swamp, but the water table was too high at the time to lay the pipe. 
This pipe will be laid when the water table has subsided. 

Marcia Road: 

This street will be completed when loam is put in place. 



Pleasant Street: 

This street is completed as far as the street itself is concerned. The hot top and curbing have been laid. 
All driveways have been taken care of. I have to reset two fences, construct one cement walk, and loam in 
back of the curbing to the property. Funds are available to complete the job. 

Ballardvale Street Account: 

Because of the grades of the school property pitching towards Salem and Ballardvale Streets, a bad water 
condition was created. Instead of two catch basins and 300 feet of pipe being installed, I had to install seven 
catch basins and about 850 feet of pipe, plus two manholes. Salem Street had to be widened from the 
school's first driveway to Ballardvale Street, plus the entire triangle. Ballardvale Street had to be 
widened from Salem Street to the entrance ramp to Route 125. Several large pines had to be removed. 
About 250 cu. yds. of ledge had to be removed plus 250 feet of stone wall. 

All the street hot top has been laid. About 1400 feet of asphalt curb laid. This had to be done even though 
not specified in the estimate to control the flow of surface water into the catch basins and prevent the water 
from flooding home owners' yards. Some sections of the sidewalk have been completed. The reason for 
terminating the sidewalk and the curbing where I did is because there are a few changes to be made after a 
land taking has been made as to the width of the street at that point. I believe there is enough money in the 
account to finish it. 

Chapter 90 Maintenance: 

Money was spent on Burlington Avenue, Park Street, Shawsheen Avenue, and Middlesex Avenue for surface 
treatment with pea gravel and heavy asphalt. 

Chapter 90 Construction: 

A balance of $8, 500. 00 from 1961 was used to extend the laying of hot top from Beacon Street to the High 

School. £ 

- : t jO 

Chapter 90 Construction for 1962 not started because the plans and the layout were not received until 
November, and I could see no point opening up Ballardvale Street so late in the year. It is carried over m 
to 1963. J 

C 

As in the past during the winter months, my men in conjunction with the Tree Department cut elms that are 
condemned and other trees that are a hazard to the traveling public. My department also renders aid to | 
the Town Engineering Department in laying out streets and setting bounds. Many new street signs, and 
various other signs to control traffic, especially in the school districts were erected. These new special 
[signs erected in the school areas received a very complimentary write-up in a prominent Boston newspaper. 

Chapter 81: I 

t 

All our Town roads are described as Chapter 81 roads. As in the past, I combine my Chapter 81 work with 
my general highway work thereby getting more for my money. 

Following is a list of streets repaired and surface-treated all or in part with Chapter 81 and general funds: 



Adelaide Street 


700 ft. 


Burnap Street 


700 ft. 


Aldrich Road 


3, 900 ft. 


Burt Road 


1, 600 ft. 


Auburn Avenue 


850 ft. 


Canal Street 


950 ft. 


Beech Street 


1, 000 ft. 


Carson Avenue 


1, 000 ft. 


Boutwell Street 


2, 800 ft. 


Cedar Street 


600 ft. 


Brattle Street 


600 ft. 


Chapman Avenue 


350 ft. 


Bridge Lane 


550 ft. 


Chestnut Street 


5, 800 ft. 


Broad Street 


1, 500 ft. 


Cochrane Road 


760 ft. 


Burlington Avenue 


1, 000 ft. 


Coolidge Road 


300 ft. 



37 



List of streets repaired and surface -treated (continued): 



Corey Avenue 


450 


ft. 


Middlesex Avenue 


2, 400 


ft. 


Cottage Street 


850 


ft. 


Miles Street 


500 


ft. 


Davis Street 


500 


ft. 


North Street 


1, 200 


ft. 


Edwards Road 


500 


ft. 


Oakwood Road 


1, 000 


ft. 


Fairfield Ave. 


450 


ft. 


Parker Street 


2, 400 


ft. 


Faulkner Avenue 


2, 300 


ft. 


Phillips Avenue 


I, 300 


ft. 


Federal Street 


4, 400 


ft. 


Pine Ave. 


500 


ft. 


Forest Street 


4, 000 


ft. 


Powder house Circle 


900 


ft. 


Grand Street 


450 


ft. 


Railroad Avenue 


750 


ft. 


Grant Street 


750 


ft. 


Roosevelt Road 


1, 220 


ft. 


Harris Street 


1, 100 


ft. 


Shaw sheen Avenue 


1, 000 


ft. 


Hillside Way 


2, 400 


ft. 


Sheridan Road 


400 


ft. 


Hopkins Street 


3, 000 


ft. 


Thurston Avenue 


800 


ft. 


Jones Avenue 


780 


ft. 


Veranda Avenue 


850 


ft. 


Lake Street 


2, 700 


ft. 


Walker Street 


400 


ft. 


Liberty Street 


800 


ft. 


Wild Avenue 


I, 100 


ft. 


Lloyd Road 


1, 200 


ft. 


Williams Avenue 


780 


ft. 


Longview Road 


750 


ft. 


Wilson Street 


750 


ft. 


Mackey Road 


300 


ft. 


Winchell Road 


250 


ft. 


Marcus Road 


600 


ft. 


Wiser Street 


500 


ft. 


Marjorie Road 


1, 400 


ft. 









At this writing, my equipment is in good condition except one 1957 dump truck. I am requesting its replace 
ment with a 1963 dump truck as it is about through as far as highway work is concerned. I am also request- 
ing a half-bag cement mixer which I need badly due to so much drainage and catch basin construction. It 
will save a lot of hard work and save valuable time. The new front-end loader purchased for the Highway 
Department has given me very good service. 

At this time I would like to thank the various departments for their co-operation and assistance rendered mi 
especially the Cemetery and Tree Departments for their able assistance in snow plowing; also the Town 
Manager and the Board of Selectmen for their hearty co-operation throughout the year. 



Sealer of Weights & Measures 



The list of measuring devices and measures adjusted and sealed during the year is as follows: 



No. adjusted No. sealed 

Gasoline pumps 27 63 

Grease & Oil pumps 16 

Vehicle Tanks 12 24 

Taximeters 2 

Scales under 100 lbs. 6 28 

Large scales 3 10 

Liquid measure: 1 gallon 3 



38 



Tree Department 



Tree Department: 

During the year 1962, the Tree Department carried on their usual work of tree removal, trimming; low 
limbs, removing broken limbs, and removing broken tree tops. These trees are diseased or dead; there- 
fore, they are taken to the town tree dump and burned to prevent further infestation of other trees. Our 
shade-tree spraying program was increased this year with a definite emphasis on our maples. As pre- 
viously reported, some maple trees are being attacked by a disease known as dieback or decline. We hope 
that continued spraying will arrest and eventually wipe out this infection. 

We continued to trim the trees surrounding the fire alarm system which has greatly reduced short circuits 
causing false alarms, and these trees will be checked at various times to prevent further trouble. 

Our tree-feeding program was continued this year. Over a hundred trees were treated. 

Our Christmas tree on the Town Common, which has been permanently planted, was decorated by this 
department under the direct supervision of the Tree Warden. This tree was donated to the Town by the 
late Herbert C. Barrows. 

Moth Department: 

As previously mentioned, all shade trees were sprayed with 6% and 12% D. D. T. for gypsy moth, tent cater- 
pillar, fall web worms, aphids, pine shoot moth, oak blights, maple leafspot, and dieback. All front 
lawns were sprayed with 6% D. D. T. for Japanese beetle and Milky disease. In different areas around 
Town, we encountered gypsy moth and tent caterpillar nests. All these egg clusters were treated with 
creosote. 

Elm Leaf Beetle and Dutch Elm Disease: 

The elm leaf beetle spraying program starts in April and continues into August. This year we lost seventy- 
five elm trees due to this disease. Over one hundred samples were sent to Amherst State College to be 
tested, and reports came back that seventy-five were infected. At various times we have been helped by 
State tree workers and the Wilmington Highway Department in removal and burning of these trees. The 
State furnished truck, men, and equipment for three weeks at no cost to the Town. To alleviate the loss of 
our elms, we have a tree -planting program which has been in operation for the past few years. This year 
we planted one hundred and fifty (150) maple trees in different sections of the town. In years gone by, 
stumps were left to rot or they were cut as close to the ground as possible leaving an unsightly mess. With- 
in the past few years, we have hired a stump cutting machine. This machine cuts any size stump two feet 
below ground level. The hole may then be filled with loam leaving a clear area. 

Mosquitoes : 

Homes, swamps, and bog areas were sprayed again this year which is the usual practice of this department. 

We also used "Toss Its" these are little gelatin bombs which dissolve in the water releasing chemicals 

which kill the larva of the mosquitoes. During the winter months, the bogs and swamps are dusted with a 
powdered chemical while they are still frozen. When they thaw out in the Spring, the chemicals contact the 
larva. None of the chemicals mentioned above are harmful to humans, fish, or wildlife. 



39 



Poison Ivy: 



Brush killer was sprayed on stone walls, streets, and around homes where poison ivy was found. The road 
side was also sprayed, with particular notice being given to street corners, where the motorist's view was 
obstructed causing an accident hazard. 



The Town Forest has been cleared of all underbrush, dead trees have been removed, and dangerous limbs 
have been cut. The road around the Forest has been cleared; also, the ball park was sprayed throughout 
the summer months. 



The hot topping program which was started in 1959 and continued over the past four years has covered about 
ninety-five per cent of our avenues. The remaining roads are to be rebuilt in 1963 and hot topped later in 
the year. 

Heavy equipment was hired to remove and haul away stumps to make way for expansion. The newly expande 
area was then cleared of roots and readied for fill. We haul the fill during our spare time. This also make 
a place for the Highway Department to dump surplus fill when excavating new roads. 

The new two-grave section, which was seeded in 1961, was measured and marked off into the eight-foot lots 
constituting two graves. Another portion of land consisting of approximately 1,000 square feet, which was 
graded and seeded, will be used for single graves. A parcel containing about 12, 000 square feet in Sect. E 
was landscaped, loamed, seeded, and marked for family lots. 

Regular routine work was conducted by our department. The whole cemetery was spread with an applicatior 
of organic fertilizer which is proving to be a very beneficial grass food. 

The Cemetery Department purchased a new industrial type tractor this year. It is equipped with a front -enc 
loader, a gravel bucket, a snow bucket, a York Rake which is used for grading, and an eight-foot street 
broom. This machinery is very effective in the upkeep of the cemetery and the care of school grounds. Th 
sweeper has proved essential also in the clearing of skating areas. 



Town Fore st: 




Cemetery: 



Wilmington residents died in Wilmington 

Wilmington residents died elsewhere 

Non-residents 

Baby interments 

Cremations 

Transfers 



13 
25 
30 
10 
1 

_J_ 

80 



40 



The Cemetery Department is responsible for the care and upkeep of the parks and school grounds. 
The five veterans' parks were kept mowed, and flowers were planted for Memorial Day. 

The Town Park was maintained throughout the year. The ball diamond was rebuilt with sand and loam and 
it was kept cut for softball. 

The Town Common received regular mowing and was watered when necessary. Two applications of ferti- 
lizer were applied to this area. 

The Silver Lake Beach area received weekly cleaning, and maintenance when necessary. Three Hundred 
and five tons of sand were added to the beach, and the parking lot was resurfaced with a layer of sand. 

School Grounds Maintenance: 

During 1962 the school grounds were used constantly for athletics, creating the need for constant upkeep. 
The grounds received two applications of fertilizer and were mowed regularly. The ball diamonds were 
kept in shape, and the track and the football field were put in condition for school activities. The men are 
constantly reloaming bare spots and thin areas that keep appearing. 

The entrance to the football field was hot topped, eliminating the problem of mud. Hot topping also include 
a walk around the back of the High School connecting the parking lots. 

The Walker School driveway was resurfaced with hot topping. Loam was hauled to start landscaping the 
area around the school. Shrubbery and evergreens were planted in the front section. This planting was 
donated by the Walker School Mothers' Club. 

In concluding my report, I would like to express my thanks to all Departments, the Town Manager, and the 
Board of Selectmen for their cooperation. 



41 



Public Library 



It is very gratifying to report that 1962 continued to find the Library serving the Town to a substantially 
greater extent. Perhaps the most significant evidence of this is the fact that almost one thousand new bor- 
rowers were registered. Book circulation figures showed an increase of 8%. 

Emphasis this year was placed on increasing our staff to provide more adequate service. In April, 

Mrs. Ruth Harding was appointed as Assistant Librarian on a full-time basis. This was made possible by 

reason of the State Grant for Public Libraries, which amounted this year to $3, 118.75. 



The State Grant also permitted the opening of the Library for an additional ten hours a week, bringing the 
total up to fifty and one-half hours a week, the number recommended by the State for a Town of our size. 

Our most serious problem is one of space. Plans to solve this situation were presented to the Town at a 
Special Town Meeting in April. These involved an appropriation of $15, 000 to purchase the old St. Thomas 
Church, and the appropriation of an additional $15, 000 to renovate it. Both appropriations were voted by 
the Town, and it was anticipated that the building would be in use in the fall of 1962. However, legal diffi- 
culties developed which prevented the Town from obtaining a clear title to the property, and the plans have 
had to be postponed. 

A change was made in the Bookmobile program when a stop at the Glen Road School was substituted for the 
one at Silver Lake. This year marks the completion of five years of Bookmobile Service provided by the 
State Regional Library Center in North Reading and administered by the Massachusetts Division of Library 
Extension. We would like to express our appreciation of this fine facility which has done a great deal to 
assist us in extending our library service. 

The opening of National Library Week in April was observed at an Open House held at the Library under the 
auspices of the Literature Club of the Wilmington Women's Club. A historical collection of books was ar- 
ranged by the librarian for this occasion, and an attractive exhibit of pictures by local artists was on displa 
Throughout the week, programs on literature and music were held at the Library under the direction of 
Mrs. Elizabeth Neilson. 

We take this opportunity to extend to the library staff our gratitude for their co-operation and effort. 



LIBRARIAN'S REPORT 



Books added to the Library 

Young people's Science Encyclopedia 

Records added: Single 



1, 988 



Albums 

Books circulated: Library 

Bookmobile 



20 vols. 
32 
9 



Records circulated 
Periodicals circulated 
New borrowers 
Fines collected 



54, 928 
3, 956 
1, 230 



811 
949 

$1 , 199. 67 



42 



Since June 1 the Library has been open during the supper hour, making the total number of hours open 
weekly 50 1/2. The new hours are as follows: 



Monday through Friday 
Saturday 



10. 00 a. m. to 12. 00 Noon ^ 
1.30 p.m. to 9.00 p.m. 7'/ 
2.00 p. m. to 5. 00 p. m. 



* 5 



Closed: Sundays and holidays, and on Saturday during July and August 

A large registration of preschool children again made it necessary to divide the Story Hour into two groups, 
each meeting on alternate Wednesdays. We are grateful to Mrs. Bruce MacDonald and 
Mrs. Theodore McKie who give so generously of their time and talent to this service. 

The Library has a good basic reference collection for general use. Inadequate space makes it difficult to 
meet the needs of the increased number of students seeking material and a place to use it. With a large 
number of students commuting to nearby colleges, the requests for college material are greater than ever. 
As a public library, we find it impossible to supply all the needs of this specialized group. This material 
is, or should be, available in the various school and college libraries. 



Permanent Building Committee 



The Permanent Building Committee is pleased to report the completion of the North Intermediate School 
Building last August, well ahead of the school opening date and within the original cost estimate of the 
Committee. 

The new school has more than twenty classrooms, a gymnasium, and auditorium. Included in the building 
are a medical suite, music room and large kitchen. The school will serve as an elementary school as well 
as an intermediate school for the next few years in order to save the cost of building a smaller elementary 
school in 1963. In October the Committee awarded a contract for the seeding of the play area, and this 
was accomplished together with landscaping prior to the winter weather. 

During the course of the past year, the Committee has spent several days in investigating sites for future 
school needs. Prior to the recommendation made to the Board of Selectmen to acquire the Hall property on 
Woburn Street, the Committee surveyed and obtained subsurface investigations on two sites. Additional 
sites will be required in West Wilmington for two new schools which will be needed by September of 1968. 
The present schedule of school building needs calls for a fifteen room elementary school for September 1964 
in North Wilmington, another ten to fifteen room elementary school for September 1966 for West Wilmington, 
and in September 1968 a twenty room intermediate school in West Wilmington. It is important to note that 
the schedule does not call for abandonment of any of the existing facilities nor does it take into account any 
large real estate development which might be started. The plans are based on the assumption that new 
housing starts will remain at the same level as those of the past three to four years. 

The Board of Selectmen appointed Mr. Robert B. Michelson, formerly a member of the Finance Committee, 
to this Committee replacing Mr. Joseph F. Courtney whose term expired. Mr. Michelson has had experi- 
ence in the construction industry, both in the Town and for the Metropolitan District Commission which will 
aid in the understanding of Committee problems. 



43 




To the Citizens of Wilmington: 

The School Committee of the Town of Wilmington herewith presents its Report for the year 1962. 

In the pages that follow, the School Committee, and the Superintendent of Schools and his associates will 
attempt to: (1) highlight the major accomplishments effected this past year in the areas of personnel and 
curriculum development, (2) apprise the citizens of the needs of our long range building program, and 
(3) point up recommendations for the improvement of our total public school operation. The report will 
conclude with the usual data about pupil enrollments and the school budget. Your careful perusal is solicited 



The number of teachers in our system continues to increase because of growing pupil enrollments and the 
desire on the part of the Committee to improve the curriculum. In the fall of 1961, the number of teachers 
and principals was 150; in September of 1962, it was 166. Of these sixteen new positions, nine represent 
additions because of increased enrollment, while seven were added to improve the programs in physical 
education, art, music, homemaking, industrial arts, guidance services, and speech therapy, with the latter 
filling a long needed want in the school system. 

During the year, the Committee elected twenty-one teachers to tenure, appointed twenty-five teachers to 
fill staff vacancies, and one member was granted a leave of absence. A breakdown of the reasons for the 
resignations reveals the following picture: 



As you can see, teacher recruitment and selection is the number one job of the Committee and the Admini- 
stration. 

The Committee made further modifications in the salary schedule, effective in 1963, to bring it into line 
with the new state minimum salary and the Committee's own policy of staying $200 above this minimum in 
order to attract and hold a competent professional staff. Thus the new salary schedule for Wilmington 
teachers with a bachelor's degree will be $4700 - $7500 in fourteen (14) yearly increments of $200 each. 
For teachers with a master's degree, the range will be $5000 - $7800. 



The North Intermediate School, the first of two, possibly three such schools in Wilmington's long range 
school building program, was ready for the opening of the school year in September, 1962. This fine school 
is not only meeting the needs of the first crush of an expanding Grade 7-8 enrollment but also houses nine 
rooms of elementary children. The latter group will have to be housed elsewhere by 1964 when the Inter- 
mediate School will become a Grade 7-8 center. 



PERSONNEL 



Family Responsibilities 
Illness 

Counselled out 
Per sonal 
Pregnancy 

Home Town Teaching 
Better Salary 
Professional Advancement 



2 
1 
3 
2 
7 
5 
3 
2 



LONG RANGE SCHOOL BUILDING PROGRAM 



44 



Looking ahead, the School Committee at its regular meeting of Wednesday, October 3, 1962, favored the 
following actions regarding Wilmington's Long Range School Building Program through the year 1968: 

I. Regarding School Sites: 

a. That the Permanent Building Committee obtain a minimum of three sites at the 
earliest possible time: 

1. One in the North Wilmington area in the vicinity of Park and Woburn Streets 
for an elementary school to be ready for occupancy September 1, 1964 

2. One in the West Wilmington area in the vicinity of Shaw sheen and Hopkins 
Street for an elementary school to be ready for occupancy September 1, 1966 

3. One in the West Wilmington area in the vicinity of Shawsheen Avenue and 
Carter Lane for an intermediate school to be ready for occupancy 
September 1, 1968 

II. Regarding Room Requirements and Types of Schools: 

(Based on School Department projections as of June, 1962: They do not provide for 
any large scale housing development of the 150-200 home type that has been getting 
some attention these past few weeks. ) 

a. That two 14 room elementary schools be constructed and equipped for occupancy 
in 1964 and 1966 respectively 

b. That an 18 room intermediate school be constructed and equipped for occupancy ^ 
in 1968 % 

b 

c. The above recommendations for schools are based on the following data: J 

<3 

1. That 29 to 32 elementary rooms will be required from 1964 through 1967 £ 
spread in this manner, 1 1 by 1964, 6 more by 1965, 8 more by 1966, 

and 4 to 7 more by 1967 

2. That at the Grade 7-12 level approximately 2100 students will be registered £ 
by 1968, with accommodations for 1325 at the high school and 540 at the 5 
intermediate school, leaving 240 to be housed. Just as in the present inter- 



mediate school, the extra classrooms in the first year or two of this school 
can be used for elementary rooms needed in 1968 or 1969 

CURRICULUM 

Educational advances initiated in our schools during the past three years (outlined in the 1961 Annual Report) 
were further refined and expanded during the 1962 school year. A brief description of these refinements will 
be covered in the report of the Superintendent of Schools. 

Schools were in session 180 days beginning September 6, 1961 and ending June 15, 1962. 
The Committee held eleven regular meetings and six special meetings during the year. 

The committee expresses appreciation to the town officials and town committees, to the instructional and 
non-instructional staff, and to the citizens of Wilmington for their assistance and cooperation during the past 
year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

45 

Wilmington School Committee 



Superintendent of Schools 



To the School Committee and Citizens of Wilmington: 

I herewith submit my third Annual Report as Superintendent of the Wilmington Public Schools for the year 
ending December 31, 1962. 

The 1962 school year can be summed up as one in which marked progress was made in the strengthening 
of the total educational program in the Wilmington Public Schools. A summary of the major developments 

follows: 

THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 

Curriculum Activity: 

A series of steps in up-dating the elementary arithmetic program, which began a few years ago, was con- 
tinued this year with the completion of an arithmetic guide for Grades 1 through 6. This guide outlining 
content, procedures, techniques, and enrichment activities was adopted as of September, 1962. It will not 
only assist the teachers of arithmetic as it is now being taught in Wilmington, but will provide a basis for 
introducing new ideas into our curriculum from research now taking place. It will also allow for experi- 
mentation with new techniques and devices. 

An Art Workshop was conducted by the Art Department on October 2, 3, and 4 at the Glen Road School for 
all public elementary teachers and local private kindergarten teachers. The teachers were instructed in 
the techniques of papier mache, crayon and chalk skills, water colors, tempera paints, ink and combina- 
tions. The finished products of the teachers were displayed in their respective schools at "Open House" 
during American Education Week. Helping with the course was the Binney and Smith Company of Boston 
who provided all the materials and consultant services. 

Changes in educational television consisted of a new phonics program produced by the 21" Classroom to 
replace the one previously rented by Channel 2 from Seattle, and a science program for Grade 3. In 1963, 
a science program will be added for Grade 4. This will provide a supplementary science program through 
Grade 6. Parents wishing to view the type of programs the children are watching in school may check with 
their children as to the day and time the programs are presented. 

For several years, an effort has been made to reestablish the combined library and reading laboratory 
which had been set up in the Wildwood School when it was first opened. The need for classrooms in the 
intervening years has prevented this from taking place. But, in September of this year, with the opening 
of the North Wilmington Intermediate School, it was possible to restore this room to its intended purpose. 
As a consequence, the reading department now has a room in which specialized instruction can be provided 
to meet the needs of all the students, slow, average, and bright. This room is being equipped with supp- 
lementary reading materials and reference books to establish it as a central library servicing the entire 
building. 

In an effort to acquire a more complete evaluation of achievement in the elementary grades, the Iowa Test 
of Basic Skills was selected to replace the California Achievement Test. The test was given to all third 
and sixth grade classes throughout the town, and the results indicated that the pupils in the Wilmington 
schools are achieving above national norms. The area of greatest strength was arithmetic, and the lowest 
achievement was indicated in the "work- study skills. " 



46 



THE SECONDARY SCHOOLS 



General Statement: 

During the past year the high school administration had to fill out a two-year follow up report on the evalua- 
tion of Wilmington High School conducted in I960. Of the hundred sixty-six recommendations made by the 
visiting committee, this was the status as of May, 1962: Seventy-five accomplished; twenty-one in pro- 
gress; forty-two in long range planning, and twenty-eight considered impractical for various reasons. At 
its annual meeting in December, 1962, the New England Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools 
accepted this report as one of satisfactory progress. 

The following developments took place within the various subject areas: 
English: 

Last year an accelerated program in Grade 12 was initiated. This year, Grades 9 through 11 have been 
added. Some of our graduates who entered college this past September have been placed in advanced 
English classes, which is our reward for initiating this type of program. The introduction of specialized 
books in literature and composition has allowed slow learners and those with reading disabilities to become 
more proficient at their own level. 

Social Studies: 



A new course in Modern History was added to the curriculum this year. Plans are being formulated to add 
a course in the History of Latin America. 



Foreign Language: 

The Language Department has inaugurated a deeper and more enriched program of study in Foreign 
Languages. This year, fourth year French and fourth year Spanish became part of the total program. 

Content in the advanced classes of Spanish, French, and German has progressed to include a broader cul- 
tural background. For example, in third year classes, art of the various countries as well as music of 
selected composers is included. In these more advanced groups, a great amount of time is spent on the 
literature of the country. The students are required and encouraged to read in the foreign language. 



> 

i 
% 
h 
J 

J 



Mathematic s: 

Throughout the United States, mathematics has been undergoing change in recent years, and the end is not 
in sight. At Wilmington High School, it is felt that the students will profit from the intellectual stimulation 
of the Modern Mathematics Programs, which are the outgrowth of the work of some of the groups concerned 
with revision of the mathematics curriculum. 



C : 

- 

c 



With upwards of a dozen major programs now underway, it is difficult to determine what is the best. After 
looking over much of the available material and talking with various teachers facing the same problems, it 
was decided that a limited venture into the Program of the School Mathematics Study Group (SMSG) would 
prove worth-while to our students. Consequently, two algebra classes (Grades 8 and 9) and one geometry 
class (Grade 9) are receiving instructions in this material. Naturally, it is too early to see conclusive 
results from the program or to make comparisons with the traditional approach, but it has been noticed 
that: 

a. The students have a greater facility with a mathematical vocabulary 

b. There is a wider use of the imagination on the part of many youngsters, and 

c. There seems to be a greater amount of difficulty on the part of the student 
who relies too much on rote memory 



47 



Two changes are contemplated in the curriculum: One, an advanced general mathematics course for non 
college -bound juniors and seniors who have no desire to study algebra; the other, the incorporating of some 
of the SMSG junior high material in advanced groups of Grade 7. The latter will receive further study- 
before being recommended. 



One rewarding extra curricular activity which has given students, faculty members, and parents a good deal 
of enjoyment has been Wilmington's participating in the Massachusetts Mathematics League. Each month 
ten students from Wilmington compete against other schools in a series of ten minute "contests" covering 
a variety of mathematical problems. Interest on the part of the students is keen, and the desire to be a 
team member during one of the monthly jousts is encouraging. At Wilmington, emphasis is placed upon 
allowing the widest participation possible to the greatest number of students without sacrificing completely 
the possibility of scoring well in competition. Wilmington was host school at this year's first session held 
on October 18, 1962. 

Science: 

A Biology class for selected students is now offered in Grade 9 in place of General Science so that these 
students may have a broader and more specialized study of Science in Grade 10 through 12. Heretofore, 
Biology was not offered until Grade 10. 

Business Education: 



J 



One change in the curriculum this year was to eliminate the half year phase of Business Law and Salesman- 
ship and make a full year course with each being offered in alternate years. 

Industrial Arts: 



Some changes made in course content this year were: 

a. Electricity - Electronics: The introduction of repairs of radio circuitry through 
the purchase of a signal tracer, tube testers, and an oscilloscope 

b. Drafting: Reproduction of blue prints with the aid of a Rotolite Expeditor plus 
offering architectural drafting for fourth year students 

c. Graphic Arts: This course has been enriched through the acquisition of a rubber 
stamp machine, a padding press, and a suede-tex machine 

Library: 

The selection, replacement and weeding out of books are constant and continuous processes of the library. 
Its collection and services are built on the correlation and enrichment of the curriculum, student activities, 
guidance, and the professional needs of the faculty. 

The library will put new emphasis in the future on its qualitative resources. In cooperation with the class- 
room teachers, more laboratory classes in all subject areas will be held in the library under the super- 
vision of the librarian and the teacher. More intensive research will be expected of students in all courses. 
Use of specialized reference books in the social studies and literature courses will develop and encourage 
independent thought and content analyses. 



Fine Arts: 

We are pleased by the growth in both the Art and Music programs. The public response to the Spring 
Festival of Art and Music was most gratifying. As a result, this will become an annual event. The band 
possesses an excellent marching background and turned in a fine performance during the football season. 
We are now working toward a concert unit which should be an even more rewarding experience to the 
members and the public. 

48 



Athletics: 



The year 1962 was a banner year for the baseball and football teams. In the spring, Wilmington High 
eliminated Newburyport, Woburn, and Cathedral High Schools to enter the final play-offs for the State 
Championship against Randolph High School. Randolph won after a hard fought game. 

In the fall, the Varsity Football Team went undefeated and untied, and defeated four schools previously 
undefeated to win the Lowell Suburban Championship for the second consecutive year. Further, with three 
other high schools, Wilmington shares the honor of being Class C Champions. Captain John Bowen achieved 
the individual honor of being the leading scorer in Eastern Massachusetts with a total of one hundred thirty- 
four points. The Junior Varsity was also undefeated for the season. 

Scholastic Recognition: 

A new form of scholastic recognition was established this year. The top five ranking students in Grades 10, 
11, and 12 were selected and singled out for individual awards. Blazers were awarded to students in the 
two upper classes and plaques to the Grade 10 recipients. This will become an annual practice. The re- 
cipients this year were: 



Class of 1962 



Clase of 1963 



Class of 1964 



Nancy Allen 
Daniel Gouvea 
Peter Krey 
Marilyn Olson 
Lorene Walley 



John Bovitz 
Lucy Keough 
Marilyn Mann 
Ruth O'Donnell 
John Robertson 



Jeanne Anderson 
Janice Baldwin 
Barbara Burnham 
Diane Mortelliti 
Geraldine Perella 



OTHER ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Reading: 

The reading program now encompasses all grades with more improvements in specifics still to come. This 
past year has witnessed the beginning of, (1) a developmental course in Grade 10, (2) the introduction of 
laboratory experiences in vocabulary and comprehension through the use of programmed instruction ma- 
terials in Grades 6, 9, and 12, (3) the scheduling of individual instructions for students with severe handi- 
caps in reading, and (4) the in-service training of teachers to refine techniques of screening, of placement, 
and of remediation. Of significant note in 1962 was the overall gain made in elementary reading achieve- 
ment; 79% of the pupils were found to be reading at grade level as compared to 56% in 1961. 

Top Scholars Recognized: 

Through arrangements made by the school administration, the Wilmington Rotary Club and the Wilmington 
Women's Club sponsored separate luncheons for ten of our outstanding high school students. Members of 
the National Honor Society were honored by the School Committee with several assemblies in the spring of 
the past year. Appropriate certificates and awards were made to each student by the various organizations. 

The success of these programs has assured a continuation of efforts by the School Committee and the School 
Administration to give scholarship its just due in public esteem. 

It is also reflected in the increased amounts of scholarship money offered to seniors by local civic, frater- 
nal, and industrial organizations. 

Summer School Program: 

When the summer school started four years ago, it was primarily to provide opportunity for students to 
make up subjects failed during the regular school year. During the past two years, the program was 

49 




expanded to include a much broader concept. Review courses in English and Mathematics, along with power 
courses in Reading are now being offered. Summer School enrollments for the 1962 summer session were 
as follows: 

Reading, Grades 1 - 6 250 
English, Grades 7-12 132 
(Arithmetic, Grades 7-8 

(Algebra and Geometry, Gr. 9 - 10) 192 

United States History- 
Grades 7, 8, 11, 12 44 

Driver Education 52 

The opening enrollment was 651, and the closing enrollment 598. 



COMMUNITY USE OF SCHOOL BUILDINGS 

Community use of buildings continues to increase in all major categories, recreational, educational, social, 
and cultural with 353 reservations made in 1962 as compared to 271 in 1961. The high school plant, in 
particular, is serving the community day and night as well as in the summer months, and it does not stand 
idle for any appreciable time. In the short four months of its operation, the North Intermediate School is 
showing a similar trend. 

SCHOOL LUNCH PROGRAM 



With the exception of the supervisor's salary, Wilmington's School Hot Lunch Program in the five schools 
where it is operating is entirely self supporting. All salaries of the personnel connected with the program 
are paid from the proceeds of the program. In addition to the services provided for the students, cafeteria 
facilities are used by community groups for many occasions. During the past 180 school days, 238,294 
Class A lunches were served in addition to the sale of sandwiches, milk, cookies, etc. Proceeds from the 
program including Federal Reimbursements amounted to $11 1, 406. 65 with expenditures totaling $107, 328. 49 
during the past school year. 

LOOKING AHEAD 

No report of this kind would be complete without a listing of the improvements that the Committee might wish 
to consider for incorporation into the total program in the years ahead. They are: 

1. Additional subject matter specialists at the elementary level in 
mathematics and science 

2. The employment of an elementary school librarian 

3. The employment of a specialist to provide psychological services 

4. A pilot study in Programmed Learning sometimes known as teaching machines 

5. The introduction of data processing equipment in the high school to refine our 
programming of students 

6. The expansion of the developmental reading program in Grades 7 through 12 



50 



[n conclusion, I wish to thank the members of the School Committee, the staff members, town officials and 
committees, and the citizens for the time and thought which they have devoted in the interests of our schools. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Harold S. Shea 
Superintendent of Schools 



WIIMINGTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 
WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 

MEMBERSHIP BY AGE AND GRADE - OCTOBER 1, 1962 

AGE - GRADE DISTRIBUTION 



Aga» ; 5 


o 


( 


a 
o 


Q 

7 


xu 


XX 


1 P 
X£ 


■•O 


A** 




X o 


1 7 


1ft 


1Q 




Grades 






























Total! 


1 88 


325 


1*5 


2 
























1*60 


2 


57 


268 


59 


5 






















389 


3 




61 


21*3 


51 


ii 




















366 


k 






39 


197 


63 


13 


2 
















311* 


5 








1*8 


203 


52 


16 


1 














320 


6 








h 


52 


177 


m 


13 














287 


7 












66 


160 


1*8 


13 












287 


8 














14-3 


185 


58 


17 


1 








301* 


9 
















58 


132 


53 


11+ 


3 






260 


10 
















3 


51* 


15U 


38 


8 


1 




258 


11 


















2 


58 


115 


20 


5 




200 


12 






















1*1* 


91 


19 


3 


157 


Ungraded 1 


3 


5 


2 


7 


1* 


3 


5 


7 


10 


11* 


6 








67 


Post Grad. 
























2 






2 


89 


385 


379 


3U5 


312 


333 


311 


267 


315 


269 


296 


218 


12I| 


25 


3 


3671 



51 



Wilmington, Massachusetts 
January 22, 1963 

Mr. Harold E. Melzar 
Temporary Town Manager 
Town Hall 

Wilmington, Massachusetts 
Dear Mr. Melzar: 

The School Committee Budget for 1963 is hereby submitted in detail. This brochure contains the breakdow 
of all items submitted in the preliminary budget of December 3, 1962. 

The budget shows a 13. 9% increase over the fiscal year 1962, due mainly to the adoption of a new salary 
schedule. Increases in the Non-Salary Items are negligible in an attempt to offset the salary increase. 

The School Committee and Superintendent will be pleased to review this budget with you and the Finance 
Committee . 

Respectfully submitted, 

Harold S. Shea 
Superintendent of Schools 

HSS:W 

For the School Committee 



SCHOOL BUDGET - 1963 



1. 


General Control 






$28, 570. 00 




Salaries 


$25, 500. 


00 






Non Salary Items 


3, 070. 


00 




2. 


Expense of Instruction 






$1, 094, 391. 71 




Salaries 


$1, 032, 605. 


1 1 






Non Salary Items 


61, 786. 


60 




3. 


Health 






$14, 056. 32 




Salarie s 


1 1, 733. 


32 






Non Salary Items 


2, 323. 


00 




4. 


Utilities 






$23, 960. 00 


5. 


Transportation 






$50, 194. 00 


6. 


Auxiliary Agencies 






$19, 621. 25 




Salaries 


3,980. 


00 






Non Salary Items 


15, 641. 


25 




7. 


Capital Outlay 






4, 360. 00 


8. 


Contingency Account 






10, 000. 00 




Salaries 


10, 000. 


00 






TOTAL SALARIES 


$1, 073, 818. 


43 






Total Non Salary Items 


161, 334. 


85 






GRAND TOTAL 






$1, 235, 153. 28 




ESTIMATED RECEIPTS 






219, 067. 93 




ESTIMATED WILMINGTON SUPPORT 






$1,016, 085. 35 



52 



1. GENERAL CONTROL 



School Committee 
Salarie s 

Clerk to School Committee 
Non Salary Items 

Associations 

Supplies 

Books & Publications 

Advertisements 
Superintendent of Schools and 
Superintendent's Office 
Salaries 

This account includes the salaries of the Superintendent, 
Administrative Assistant, Secretary, and a sum for 
Accounting-Clerical Services not to exceed $1, 000. 00 
(App. "E") 



450. 00 
75. 00 

525. 00 
50. 00 



Increase: 

Non Salary Items 

Utilities 

In State Travel 

Supplies & Equipment 
No change: 
Child Accounting 
Salaries 

Attendance Officer 

Census Enumerator 



1, 500. 00 

820. 00 
450. 00 
700. 00 



000. 00 
000. 00 



1962 



300. 00 
1, 100. 00 



21, 700. 00 



1, 970. 00 



1, 800. 00 



1963 



300. 00 
1, 100. 00 



23, 200. 00 



1, 970. 00 



2, 000. 00 



Total General Control 



26, 870. 00 



28, 570. 00 



2. EXPENSE OF INSTRUCTION 

Subject Specialists 
Salarie s 

This account includes the salaries of the personnel 
working on a system wide basis. 

Breakdown: 

Sept. -Dec. Rate: 



8 Increments to meet State 

minimum $300 
8 Increments to meet Wilmington 
minimum and regular $200 
increment ($400) 4 Months 
1 Increase in differential $200 

4 Months 
1 Increase in differential ($150) 
4 Months 
Increase: 
High School 
Salarie s 

This account includes the salaries of all teachers, super- 
visory, guidance, and administrative personnel in the 
High School (App. "B"). 



53, 400. 00 

2, 400. 00 

1, 066. 64 

66. 67 

50. 00 
4, 549. 95 



52, 433. 36 



56, 983. 31 



377, 836. 90 



420, 185. 43 



2 
z. 



£ 



c ■ 


&' 
c 

E 



53 



Breakdown: 

Sept. - Dec. rate 



379, 270. 00 



1962 



1963 



69 Increments to meet State minimum 
($300) - 12 Months 20,700.00 

70 Increments ($400) to meet Wilming- 
ton minimum and regular $200 

increment 4 Months 9, 333. 10 

Secretary 200. 00 

Additional differentials Athletic Coaches 

and Band Leader 4 Months 400. 00 

5 Additional Teachers ($5000) 4 Months 8, 333. 33 

3 Masters Degrees 4 Months ($300) 300. 00 

Additional Differential 1 1 Month 

Personnel 60. 00 

Differential Traveling Teachers 500. 00 

Basketball, Intermediate School, 

Asst. Track Coach 225.00 

1 Part-time Clerk $1. 60 Jan. 1963, 
$1. 70 September, 1963 - 1 Part- 
time Clerk $1. 50 Jan. , 1963, 

$1. 60 Sept. 1963 864. 00 

Increase: 42,348.53 

212 Texts & Instructional Aids 14,168.48 15,996.00 i 
This account provides Textbooks, (New, 

Replacements, and Rebinds) Texting 
Materials (including machine scoring 
services) and Audio Visual Aid Materials for 
1595 pupils @ $10. 02 per pupil. 

Increase: 1,827.52 

213 Stationery Supplies 18,058.76 18,821. 00 j 
This account provides supplies and mainten- 
ance in the following areas: Arts, Music, 

Industrial Arts, Business, Homemaking, 
Science, and general supplies (paper, pencils, 
etc. ) for 1595 pupils @ 1 1. 80 per pupil. 

Increase: 762. 24 

214 N. D. E. A. Matching Funds H. S. 

Instructional Aids 9,000.00' 00 

Decrease: 9,000.00 

215 Maintenance & Repair of Equipment 00 1.500.0C 
Increase: 1,500.00 

220 Elementary Schools 



221 Salaries 424,560.26 522,230.3- 



All Elementary Staff including differentials 
for Administrative Personnel 
Breakdown: 

Sept. - Dec. Rate 477,700.00 

86 Increments to meet State minimum 

($300) 12 Months 25,800.00 

88 Increments ($400) to meet Wilming- 
ton minimum and regular $200 

increment (4 Months) 1 1,733.04 

1 Increment ($100) to reach State 

minimum 100. 00 

54 



Breakdown (continued) 

1 Addition to differential ($100 - 4 Mos. ) 33.33 

3 New Teachers $5000 - 4 Months 5, 000. 00 
Additional differential 1 1 Month 

Personnel 120.00 

4 Part-time Clerks 3 @ $1. 60 Jan. 1963 

and $1. 70 Sept. 1963 and two addi- 
tional hours a day for the Clerk at 
the Intermediate School; 1 Part-time 
Clerk @ $1. 50 Jan. 1963 and $1. 60 
Sept. 1963 1 
Increase: 97 
Texts & Instructional Aids 



1962 



1963 



744. 00 
670. 1 1 



This account provides Textbooks (new, 
replacements, and rebinds) Supplementary 
Reading Materials, and Audio Visual 
Materials for 2276 pupils @ $5. 85 per pupil. 
Increase: 

Stationery & Supplies 

This account provides General Supplies for 
the Elementary School Program, Special 
Supplies (Lumber, Metal, Tools, etc.) for 
the Retarded Classes, and the Rinehart 
Handwriting System for 2276 pupils @ 
$5. 25 per pupil 
Increase: 

Substitute Teachers 



Effective September, 1963 substitutes will 
receive $17. 00 a day and the home teacher 
$4. 00 an hour. This figure is based on an 
average of 4 1/2 days absence for 174 
teachers; also an increase in the number of 
pupils requiring home tutoring due to pro- 
tracted illness. 

Substitute Teachers 
Home Teacher 

Increase: 
Evening Schools 
Increase: 

Evening School Expenses 
No Change 
Summer School 
No Change 

Total Expense of Instruction 



463. 05 



719. 68 



13, 31 1. 00 
2, 000. 00 

15, 31 1. 00 
3, 061. 00 

495. 00 



12, 851. 55 



13, 314. 60 



1 1, 235. 32 



1 1, 955. 00 



12, 250. 00 



15, 311. 00 



7, 600. 00 
200. 00 
9, 800. 00 

949, 994. 63 



8, 095. 00 
200. 00 
9, 800. 00 

1, 094, 391. 71 



55 



3. HEALTH 



301 Salaries - Physicians 
School Physician 
Athletic Physician 
Increase: 

311 Salaries - Nurses 
Helen E. Martin 
Sylvia Levine 
Part-time Nurse 



Inc rease : 
3 12 Supplies 

Increase: 
313 Mental Health Services 

Increase: 



1, 400. 00 
1, 000. 00 
400. 00 

4, 366. 66 
4, 066. 66 
900. 00 
9, 333. 32 
1, 316. 65 

48. 00 

800. 00 



Total 



1962 
2, 000. 00 



8,016. 67 



475. 00 
1, 000. 00 
11, 491. 67 



1963 
2, 400. 00 



9, 333. 32 



523. 00 
1, 800. 00 
14, 056. 32 



4. UTILITIES 



412 Utilities, High School & Intermediate School 
It is estimated $2400 will be required to 
furnish light, telephone, water, etc. for a 
full year's operation of the Intermediate 
School 
Increase: 

422 Utilities - Elementary 
Increase: 
Total 



8, 400. 00 



2, 800. 00 
1, 220. 00 



1 1, 540. 00 
19, 940. 00 



1 1, 200. 00 



12, 760. 00 
23, 960. 00 



5. TRANSPORTATION 



502 



512 



522 



532 



Bus Transportation 
113 days @ $216 
74 days @ $216 
Civil Defense Dispersal buses 

Increase: 



40, 392. 00 



41, 392. 00 



In 1962, this account was reduced $20,000 
to be picked up via P. L. 874 monies and 
other accounts in the regular budget show- 
ing favorable balances, per agreement be- 
tween the School Committee and Finance 
Committee 
Taxi - All Schools 

Physically and Mentally Handicapped 
Children In-town: 180 days @ $15. 00 
Out-of-town: 180 days @ $20. 00 
Increase: 

Athletic Transportation 
Increase 

Out of State Travel 
I. American Association of School 
Administrators Convention, Atlantic 
City, N. J. 



24, 408. 00 
15, 984. 00 

1, 000. 00 
41, 392. 00 

1, 000. 00 



2, 700. 00 
3, 600. 00 
3, 960. 00 

300. 00 



250. 00 



2, 340. 00 

1, 752. 00 
450. 00 



6, 300. 00 

2, 052. 00 
450. 00 



56 



Out of State Travel (continued) 1962 1963 

2. American Association of Secondary 
School Principals Convention, Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania 200. 00 

No Change 

Total 44,934.00 50,194.00 

6. AUXILIARY AGENCIES 

Libraries: 5,761.20 5,966.00 

High School 1595 students® 1.60 2,552.00 
Elementary Schools 2276 students 

@ 1. 50 3, 414. 00 

5, 966. 00 

Increase: 204. 80 

Physical Education & Athletics 5,135.00 5,135.00 

No Change 

Cafeteria 

Salary - Supervisor 3,900.00 3,980.00 

Increment ($200) 4 Months 

Increase 80. 00 

Non Salary Items 3,000.00 2,000.00 

Maintenance & Replacement 1,000.00 
Subsidy 1,000.00 
Decrease 1,000.00 

Special Education - Tuition 00 1,600.00 

Increase 1,600.00 

Educational TV 940.25 940.25 

Assessment for Channel 2, Educational TV 

Programs, rate 25c. per pupil j. 
No Change ^ 

Total 18,736.45 19,621.25 <3 

%m 



7. CAPITAL OUTLAY £ 
<D 

New Equipment 10,563.00 4,360.00 

1. Trade in thirteen Manual Typewriters for: 

10 Typewriters (Manual) 1, 000. 00 

3 Electric Typewriters 720. 00 

2. Purchase: 

Two (2) Typewriters (16") Manuals 460. 00 

Two Rooms Elementary Furniture 1, 400. 00 

6 Reading Accelerators 780. 00 

4, 360. 00 

Decrease: 6,203.00 

Sick Leave - Tuberculosis 5,000.00 10,000.00 

Chap. 71, Sect. 55B 

Increase: 5,000.00 

GRANDTOTAL $1,082,529.75 $1,235,153.28 

Exclusive of Contingency Account 



57 



COMPARATIVE BUDGETS 



App. "A 





Salarie s 


Non Salary Items 


Total 


Increase 


17 DO 


CIO 729 QC 


1 ni aqi nn 
1 U 1 , 47 j. uu 


i 1Q *7 9 C QC 


OA L. "7 yl /I 

07 , o74. o4 


1 Q 




1 £ U , DO. UU 


7ti G, A 9C 
f DO, L.D 


1 JO, 0U0. JO 


1 q An 
1 7 ou 


7nA 7nn nn 

lUO, (UU. uu 


ion c 9 a nn 
1 £7 , oa. uu 


ojO, LC*±. UU 


7n ton "7 c 
( 7 , 007. 7b 


1 Q A 1 
1 7 D 1 


a ? n 7^8 7 ^ 


14 1 A7 A 7 1 


Q A9 9 ^ A Q A 


i nin nt 
i £ O , U1U. 70 


1962 


922, 197. 19 


160, 332. 56 


1, 082, 529. 75 


120, 294. 79 


1963 


1, 073, 818. 43 


161, 334. 85 


1, 235, 153. 28 


152, 623. 53 






Salary Increase 


Non Salary Items 


Total Increase 


1 QtQ 

1 7 _> O 




HI A 1 Q AA 
1 , *± 1 7 . Dt 


ice r>n 
, COO . UU 


on A7A AA 






117 A? A \C\ 


1 q is? nn 

17, 1 L . UU 


1 ^ A ana ^n 

1 JO, oUo. jU 


1 0, An 
1 7 u 




7 fiifl 7K 
1 U , O 4U . (J 


8 saq nn 

, Ort7 . UU 


7Q ABO 7K 
(7 , 007 • 1 


1 Q A 1 

1 7 D 1 




1 1 A n ^8 7 In 


11 QC7 ? 1 


1 ? A n 1 n q A 
1 £ , uiu. 70 


1962 




101, 438. 44 


18, 856. 35 


120, 294. 79 


1963 




151, 621. 24 


1, 002. 29 


152, 623. 53 






% Budget Increase 


Enrollment Increase 




1958 




17 % 


7.9 % 




1959 




22 % 


6. 5 % 




I960 




10. 5% 


6. 6 % 




1961 




15 % 


7. 2 % 




1962 




12. 5% 


5. 38% 




1963 




14 % 


5. 45% 





SALARY SCHEDULE App. "B" 

EFFECTIVE SEPTEMBER, 1963 



A salary schedule is no mere table of wages, but should serve many functions. It should attract the pro- 
fessionally minded, it should reward successful service, and it should inspire professional growth. In 
approaching such a schedule, the School Committee was conscious of its many responsibilities, to the 
parents whose children must be trained by competent instructors, to the teachers who must maintain ade- 
quate living and professional standards, and to the citizens who must provide approximately seventy-five 
per cent of the operational cost of education. The following schedule attempts to reconcile all of the above 
mentioned factors: 

Yrs. in Service Bachelor's Degree Master's Degree 



1 


4, 700. 


00 


5, 000. 


00 


2 


4, 900. 


00 


5, 200. 


00 


3 


5, 100. 


00 


5, 400. 


00 


4 


5, 300. 


00 


5, 600. 


00 


5 


5, 500. 


00 


5, 800. 


00 


6 


5, 700. 


00 


6, 000. 


00 


7 


5, 900. 


00 


6, 200. 


00 


8 


6, 100. 


00 


6, 400. 


00 


9 


6, 300. 


00 


6, 600. 


00 


10 


6, 500. 


00 


6, 800. 


00 


1 1 


6, 700. 


00 


7, 000. 


00 


12 


6,900. 


00 


7, 200. 


00 


13 


7, 100. 


00 


7, 400. 


00 


14 


7, 300. 


00 


7, 600. 


00 


15 


7, 500. 


00 


7, 800. 


00 






58 







Type of Schedule: Preparation - Improvement 



1. Annual increments of $200. 00 are granted for successful completion of course work according to 
the following plan: 

a. Bachelor's or less: Six semester hours every three years 

b. Master's or Bachelor's plus 

15 years' experience Three semester hours every three years 

Workshop Courses, In-Service Programs, and original creative works or publications will be 
evaluated by the Superintendent and School Committee in lieu of Graduate Courses. 

Employment of Experienced Teachers: 

Teachers entering the Wilmington School System may be placed on the salary schedule with credit for 
experience up to four years. In the case of an exceptionally qualified candidate, the School Committee 
may propose a salary commensurate with that of the last teaching position. 

Courses and Graduate Study: 

1. Approval for Courses or Graduate Study must be obtained from the Superintendent prior to enroll- 
ment. The bases for determining approval are the following: 

a. The course should provide professional growth in keeping with the teacher's present pro- 
gram, or future responsibilities. 

b. Courses and Graduate study must be pursued in a College or University affiliated with the 
American or New England Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. 

c. In the pursuit of degrees, teachers are limited to six hours credit per semester, and eight 
hours credit during the Summer session. Principals may recommend a lesser load if, in 

their judgment, classroom effectiveness would suffer. j 

It 

2. Master's Degrees: Notice of anticipated receipt of a Master's degree must be given the Superin- 
tendent prior to October 31 for Budgetary purposes. 

E 
$ 

Pay Schedule: 2 

1. The salaries of all School Personnel shall be paid in amounts of l/24th the annual salary on the 15 
and 30 days of each month. In the case of holidays, week-ends, or vacation periods, salaries will be 
paid on the last school day previous to the above. Lump sum payments for July and August shall be 
paid as soon as records and pay rolls are completed. 

p 
t 

2. Increments shall be granted on September 1 of each school year unless otherwise specified by the 
School Committee. 

3. Differentials paid to principals, supervisors, directors, and coaches shall be determined by the 
School Committee. 

Conditions of Employment: 

1. General Policies: 

a. Teachers shall have available to them five (5) days Annual Sick Leave cumulative to 
fifty (50) days. The basic starting point for this plan will be September 1, 1961. 



59 



b. Tenure Teachers: 

1. As of August 31, 1961, teachers carrying a cumulative total of unused Sick Leave 
shall have this total increased by fifty (50) per cent. Persons presently at maximum 
shall automatically advance to the new maximum of fifty (50) days as of Sept. 1, 1961. 

2. Any unused portion of the Basic Five (5) Day Annual Sick Leave at the close of any 
school year will be doubled and added to the cumulative total, if any. 



c. Non-Tenure Teachers: 

1. All Non-Tenure Teachers shall have available to them five (5) days Annual Sick Leave 

2. Any unused portion of the Basic Five (5) Day Annual Sick Leave at the close of any 
school year will be doubled and added to their cumulative total, but held in abeyance 
until the beginning of their fourth successive election year in Wilmington. 

3. All teachers beginning their second or third year in Wilmington as of September 1, 
196 1, with any accumulation will not be affected by the five (5) day restriction; but 
their fifty (50) per cent bonus increase of their August 31, 1961 accumulation, if any, 
will be held in abeyance until the beginning of their fourth successive election year in 
Wilmington. 

4. All teachers beginning their third year in Wilmington as of September 1, 1962 will 
have available to them the unused August 31, 1961 cumulative balance plus their 
1962-63 Basic Five (5) Day Annual Sick Leave. Any unused portion of the Basic Five 
(5) Day Annual Sick Leave of 1961-62 will be doubled and added to the cumulative total 
on the fourth successive election year in Wilmington. 

d. Any teacher having a cumulative sick leave total at/or in excess of sixty per cent (60%) of 
maximum (which is 30 days) who is afflicted with a serious illness or accident that consume 
more sick leave time than the teacher has accumulated, may request the School Committee 
for consideration beyond the actual time allowed. 

Other Provisions: 

a. Four (4) days additional leave will be allowed for a death in the teacher's immediate family, 
i.e., parents, brother, sister, spouse, or children. 

b. One (1) day additional leave will be granted in case of the death of other relatives or a close 
friend. 

c. Absences authorized by administrative permission will not be considered as part of teacher 
sick leave. 

d. No teacher shall be charged time against sick leave for any day that schools are not in 
session. 



DIFFERENTIALS 



Principal, High School $2,000.00* 

Assistant Principal, High School 1, 000. 00 

Guidance Director 800. 00* 

Guidance Counselor 400. 00 

Head of Department $50. 00 a teacher 

Max. $500. 00 

Driver Education 540. 00 

Supervising Principal, Elementary Schools 1,500.00* 
Principal's Assistant, Elementary 

a. Ten teachers or less $50. 00 a teacher 

b. More than ten teachers 500. 00 
Special Class Teacher 500. 00 
Director of Physical Education & Athletics 1, 450. 00 



60 



DIFFERENTIALS (continued) 



11. 
12. 
13. 



14. 

15. 

16. 
17. 



19. 

20. 
21. 
22. 
23. 



Director of Music, All Schools 

Supervisors 

Football, Head Coach 

Football, Assistant Coaches (2 @ $400 each) 

Football, Freshman Coach 

Baseball, Head Coach 

Baseball, Assistant Coach 

Basketball, Head Coach 

Basketball, Assistant Coach 

Faculty Manager of Athletics 

Coach of Girls' Sports 

Assistant Coach of Girls' Sports (1 @ $300 and 1 @ $200) 

Intramural Coaches, High School and Intermediate 

(Football, Baseball, Basketball & Hockey) 

Four at $125, One at $175, and one at $225 

Track Coach 

Assistant Track Coach 

High School, Senior Class Advisor 

High School, Coach of Dramatics 

High School, Advisor to School Paper 

Advisor, School News 



700. 00 
600. 00 
750. 00 
800. 00 
200. 00 
375. 00 
200. 00 
400. 00 
225. 00 
325. 00 
400. 00 
500. 00 



900. 00 
375. 00 
125. 00 
150. 00 
150. 00 
200. 00 
200. 00 



* The Supervising Principals and Director of Guidance are eleven month personnel, 
they receive 1/10 of their base pay and above differential. 



For the extra month, 



MAINTENANCE AND REPAIRS 



App. "C" 



Standard Provisions: 

Provide materials and manpower schedule to: 

1. Keep all buildings clean and sanitary 

2. Loam, fertilize, and seed school grounds where needed 

3. Refinish floors and desk tops 

4. Clean and service boilers and burners 

5. Keep wiring in all buildings up to fire code standards 

6. Keep heat controls in new buildings in balance 

7. Repair odds and ends in the daily operation of all buildings 



J 2 



Special Provisions: 
High School: 

1. Install heating unit in the Metal Shop 

2. Paint auditorium and foyer 

3. Paint gymnasium 

4. Paint locker rooms 

5. Paint shops 

6. Paint main office 

7. Repair or close up greenhouse 

8. Repair roof over library and over room #230 

9. Improve ventilation in boys football locker room 
10. Retile kitchen floor 



61 



MAINTENANCE AND REPAIRS (continued) 



Buzzell School: 

1. Refurbish grounds on north side of building 

2. Hot top area in back of building and continue drive all the way around building 

3. Start installation of fluorescent lights in all classrooms 

Glen Road School: 

1. Paint interior doors 

2. Install curtains in skylights of 4 classrooms 

3. Paint game lines on hot top play area 

4. Repair main laminated beam in Room #9 

5. Remove dead logs and debris from playfields 

6. Improve ventilation in kitchen, all-purpose room and corridor 

Rogers School: 

1. Paint outside of building 

2. Hot top play area 

3. Loam and seed in front of building 

4. Install two sinks, one each in Boys' and Girls' lavatory 
Walker School : 

1. Landscape school grounds 

Whitefield School : 

1. Paint outside of building 

2. Dress up the grounds 

3. Hot top entrance areas and complete drive around building 
Center School: 

1. Carry landscaping improvements, started in 1962, to rear of property including additional hot 
topping and seeded areas 

2. Do minor repairs 

3. Make two rooms ready for movable furniture 
Swain School: 

1. Renovate basement floor. A good start was made in 1961 on the first two floors. The basement 

floor is drab, dingy and, sometimes, even unsanitary. The whole area needs tq be opened up to propc 
lighting and ventilation. Floor should be redone, toilet facilities should be modernized, old closets 
torn down, walls painted, and sills repaired. 

West School: 

1. Do minor repairs 

2. Install oil burner 

3. Seed playground area 

Boutwell School: 

1. Install three (3) bicycle racks 

2. Paint game lines on black top 

3. Repair main laminated beams in two rooms 

4. Improve ventilation in kitchen, corridor and all purpose room 

5. Replace TV antenna 

Wildwood School: 

1. Refurbish play area 

2. Enlarge parking area, rear delivery entrance, east exit, and front entrance 

3. Install curbing in driveway 

62 



Wildwood School (continued) 



4. Install blackout curtains in all purpose room 

5. Repaint parking and game lines on parking and play areas 

6. Install fence, south side of building 

7. Install one ton chain fall, with set of slings, in crawl space bulkhead 

8. Repair awnings over exit doors of all purpose room 



It is recommended that the following schools be tied in with the Central" Fire Alarm System: 

Buzzell Walker 

Center West 

Rogers Whitefield 

Swain Wildwood 

Check all fire detector sprays; many of them are not operable. 

It is the contention of the school department that major improvements of the kind listed above will not only 
go a long way to attract new industry to the town, but will also provide the physical environment for a first- 
rate education. The town needs the former to help defray costs. The children of Wilmington should not be 
denied the latter. 

ESTIMATED INCOME AND STATE REIMBURSEMENTS App. "D" 

1. General Laws, Chapter 70 

State Aid for Public Schools $160, 116. 68 

2. General Laws, Chapter 70, Sect. 3A 

Special Classes 18, 151.86 

3. General Laws, Chapter 71, Sect. 7A 
Transportation 21,518.53 

4. Evening Schools 2,800.00 

5. Division of Child Guardianship 16, 480. 86 
TOTAL ESTIMATED INCOME $219,067.93 

Estimated Federal Aid: 

P. L. 874 (Parents employed on Federal Property) 

1961- 62 15,241.46 

1962- 63 (Estimated) 20, 000. 00 

35, 241. 46 

P. L. 85-864 (N. D. E. A. , Matching Basis) 

Title III 4, 158. 51 

Title V 3, 000. 00 

7, 158. 51 



63 



ROSTER OF SCHOOL PERSONNEL AND THEIR SALARIES App. "E" 



ADMINISTRATIVE 

Harold S..Shea, Superintendent 
Mildred F. Woods, Adm, Ass't. 
Clerk, School Committee 
Catherine E. Souza, Secretary 
Dr, Gerald A. Fagan 
Dr. Ernest C. MacDougall 
Sylvia Levine, Nurse 
Helen E. Martin, Nurse 
Attendance Officer 
Census Enumerator 
Wilhelmina DeLisle, Cafeteria 



CENTRAL OFFICE STAFF 

Evelyn R. Andersen 
Mary E.T. Boutilier 
Lawrence H. Cushing 
Dominic DeGrazia 
Lorraine M. Kalil 
Anne M. McParland 
Mary J. Ouinn 
Sybil Wiberg 



HIGH SCHOOL 

Bernard P. McMahon, Principal 

Dolores Allen 

Joseph P. Beaton 

Frederick Beilissimo 

Roger F. Breakey 

George F. Ccgan 

Camllle Consolino 

Georgia Dadoly 

Edward J. DeFlumere 

Marie G. DeLeo 

Louis J. Demetroulakos 

Anne M. McDermott 

Ramon J. deRosas 

James C. Desmond 

Robert E. Dicey 

Barbara A. Gould 

Kathryn L. Dougherty 

Harold E. Driscoll 

James E. Duff 

Thomas F. Eagar 

Virgi nia Erickson J. ) ft^Q 'ft ^ 

Elene Farello 

James J. Gilligan 



SEPTEMBER 
1962 



$12,500.00 
5,000.00 

300.00 
3,200. GO 

800.00 
1,200.00 
4,000.00 
4,300.00 

900oC0 

900.00 
3,900.00 



$37,000.00 



SEPTEMBER 
1963 



$13,500.00 
5,300.00 
300.00 
3,400.00 
1,000.00 
1,400.00 
4,200.00 
4,500.00 
1,000.00 
1,000.00 
4,100.00 



$39,700.00 



JAN. to 

DEC. 1963 

$13,500.00 
5,300.00 
300.00 
3,400.00 
1,000.00 
1,400.00 
4,066.67 
4,366.67 
1,000.00 
1,000.00 
3,980.00 



$39,313.34 



$7,1G0.00 
6,800.00 
7,800.00 
6,900.00 
6,500.00 
6,400.00 
5,100.00 
6,800.00 



$53,400.00 



$7,800.00 
7,700.00 
8,650.00 
7,600.00 
7,200.00 
7,100.00 
5,800.00 
7,500.00 



$59,350.00 



$7,533.33 
7,300.00 
8,283.33 
7,333.33 
6,933.33 
6,833.33 
5,533.33 
7,233.33 



$56,983.31 



$9,350.00 
4,600.00 
6,875.00 
6,200.00 
6,290.00 
6,300.00 
4,200.00 
5,100.00 
5,200,00 
4,800.00 
5,000,00 
4.200. CO 
5,100.00 
5,640.00 
4,875.00 
4,400.00 
4,200.00 
8,000.00 
4,200.00 
4,700.00 
6,200.00 
6,850.00 
6,375.00 



$10,080.00 
5,300.00 
7,600.00 
7,050.00 
6,990.00 
7,025.00 
4,900.00 
5,800.00 
5,900.00 
5,500.00 
5,700.00 
4,900.00 
5,5'J0.00 
6,340.00 
5,650.00 
5,100.00 
4,900.00 
8,700.00 
4,900.00 
5,400.00 
6,900.00 
7,550.00 
7,175.00 



$9,813.33 
5,033.33 
7,316.66 
6,683.33 
6,723.33 
6,741.66 
4,633.33 
5,533.33 
5,633.33 
5,233.33 
5,433.33 
4,633.33 
5,233.33 
6,073.33 
5,333.33 
4,833.33 

4,633.33 
8,433.33 
4,633.33 
5,133.33 
6,633.33 
7,283.33 
6,841.66 




HIGH SCHOOL (Continued) 

Alfio B. Graceffa 
Elizabeth Lowry 
Richard W. Grant 
Maureen H alp in 
Alfred G. Hambelton 
Robert E. Hamilton 
Janes D. Hansen 
Jane R. Harris 
Charles L. Hazelton, Jr. 
Norma A. Heseltine 
Donald E. Heyliger 
Judith M. Lee 
Adele M. Camuso 
Walter S. Kaezka 
Charles R. Keady 
Francis P. Kelley 
Mary B. Kelly 
Frank Lentine 
Laura N. Marland 
Alice McCarthy 
Jane A. Holbrook 
Robert A. McLean 
Gertrude L. McManus 
Peter G. Melchiono 
Mary M. Muldoon 
Elizabeth T. Murphy 

John F. Murphy 

John J. O'Rourke 

Ellen H. Parker 

Mary V. Picciuolo 

Joan M. Quinn 

Henry P. Ramette 

Barbara Rothstein 

Robert Saba 

Charles Shier e 

Joanne Shinnick 

Pasquale J. Spinosa 

Edward A. Sullivan 

Hazel G. Taylor 

B. Douglas Townshend 

George M. Webber 

Elizabeth A. Baran 

Diane X. Triantafilou 

Vincent Gallucci 

John H. Hamilton 

Marjorie A. Marshall 

Irene M. Sharp 

Eleanor F. Day, Secretary 

Doris O'Reilly, P.T. Clerk 

Dorothy F. Rice, P.T. Clerk 

John A. Ritchie, Ass't. Coach 



SEPTEMBER 


SEPTEMBER 


JAN. to 


1962 


1963 


DEC. 1963 


5,400.00 


6,300.00 


5,900.00 


4,950.00 


5,650.00 


5,383.33 


5,275.00 


6,000.00 


5,716.66 


5,200.00 


5,900.00 


5,633.33 


6,600.00 


7,300.00 


7,033.33 


4,950.00 


5,650.00 


5,383.33 


5,400.00 


6,100.00 


5,833.33 


4,200.00 


4,900.00 


4,633.33 


4,200.00 


4,900.00 


4,633.33 


4,200.00 


4,900.00 


4,633.33 


4,925.00 


5,700.00 


5,383.33 


4,400.00 


5,300.00 


4,900.00 


4,200.00 


4,900.00 


4,633.33 


4,400.00 


5,100.00 


4,833.33 


6,200.00 


7,000.00 


6,666.66 
7,691.66 


7,225.00 


8,025.00 


4,600.00 


5,300.00 


5,033.33 


5,000.00 


5,700.00 
7,700.00 


5,433.33 


7,000.00 


7,433.33 


6,400.00 


7,100.00 


6,833.33 


4,600.00 


5,300.00 


5,033.33 


4,900.00 


5,600.00 


5,333.33 


4,600.00 


5,300.00 


5,033.33 


4,600.00 


5,300.00 


5,033.33 


4,400,00 


5,100.00 
5,400.00 


4,833.33 


4,700.00 


5,133.33 


4,700.00 


5,425.00 


5,141.67 


4,700.00 


5,400.00 


5,133.33 


4,400.00 


5,100.00 


4,833.33 


4,200.00 


4,900.00 


4,633.33 


5,000.00 


5,700.00 


5,433.33 


4,400.00 


5,100.00 


4,833.33 


4,200.00 
5,700.00 


4,900.00 


4,633.33 


6,400.00 


6,133.33 


5,700.00 


6,400.00 


6,133.33 
4,633.33 


4,200.00 


4,900,00 


4,400.00 


5,100.00 


4,833.33 


5,700.00 


6,400.00 


6,133.33 


5,200.00 


5,900.00 


5,633.33 


5,000.00 


5,700.00 


5,433.33 


6,500.00 


7,200.00 


6,933.33 


6,000.00 


6,700.00 


6,433.33 


4,600.00 


5,300.00 


5,033.33 


5,900.00 


6,600.00 


6,333.33 


7,810.00 


8,540.00 


8,273.33 


6,900.00 


7,600.00 


7,333.33 


6,900.00 


7,600.00 


7,333.33 


4,000.00 


4,200.00 


4,200.00 


1,200.00 


1,312.00 


1,312.00 


480.00 


1,232.00 


1,232.00 


300.00 


400.00 


333.33 



g 

i. 





$379,270.00 $430,294.00 $410,827.09 



65 



WT.LDWOOD SCHOOL 



SEPTEMBER SEPTEMBER JAN. to 
1962 1963 DEC. . 1963 



Ralph T. Ambrose, Sup. Prin. 

Katherine M. Barry 

Evelyn Desmarais, Bldg. Prin. 

Margaret Farrell 

Ruby Fitzslmmons 

Carol Folklns 

Tlrzah M. Krey 

Martha B. Logan 

Judith A. Marion 

Josephine O'Donnell 

Ruth Prolman 

Mary J. Quirk 

Marianne R. Flynn 

Loddy Weisberg 

Barbara A. White 

Edith P. Jaquith, P.T. Clerk 



WHITEFIELD SCHOOL 



Marjorie S. Ethier, Bldg. Prin. 

Lena Leiter 

Anne L. Medelinskas 

Mary E. Picciuolo 





<io •vin nn 


<iO O ftl 11 
97,£Oj. J J 


L 9 nn nn 


A onn nn 
*», yuu. uu 


/, ft 1 1 11 

H, OJJ . J J 


fi ftnn nn 


7 ^no nn 
/ , JUU. uu 


"7 *> 11 11 


L 0(\C\ (\C\ 

H , £• UU . Uv 

ft ?nn nn 

D,i UU • UU 


a onn nn 
H, yuu. uu 


OJJ . JJ 


£ onn nn 
O, 7UU. uu 


ft ftll 11 
0, OJJ . J J 


5,900.00 


6,600.00 


6,333.33 


5,300.00 


6,000.00 


5,733.33 


a son nn 


c onn nn 
J , ^- uu* uu 


A Oil 11 
*f , V J J . JJ 


4,600.00 


5,300.00 


5,033.33 


6,200.00 
5,600.00 


6,900.00 


6,633.33 


6,300.00 


6,033.33 


4,600.00 


5,300.00 


5,033.33 


4,600.00 


5,300.00 


5,033,33 


6,300.00 


7,000.00 


6,733.33 


4,200.00 


4,900.00 


4,633.33 


1,200.00 


1,312.00 


1,312.00 


$83,200.00 


$93,842.00 


$89,841.95 



$6,400.00 
6,500.00 
4,200.00 
4,800.00 



$7,100.00 
7,200.00 
4,900.00 
5,500.00 



$6,833.33 
6,933.33 
4,633.33 
5,233o33 



$21,900.00 $24,700.00 $23,633.32 



WALKER SCHOOL 

Mildred Keville, Bldg. Prin. 
Gladys Dunigan 
Margaret Jordan 
Cynthia A. Hoare 



GLEN ROAD SCHOOL 



Robert F. Barrett, Sup. Prin. 

Mary J. Brady 

Phyllis A. Coffey 

Marcia E. Daley 

Richard DeRosas 

Ellen R. Donahue 

Laraine M. Geswell 

Joanne M. Myers 

Helen B. Roth 

Florine M. Santos 

Mary L. Scully, Bldg. Prin. 

Dolores Silva 

Geraldine Wrigley 

Bernadette Moegelin, P.T. Clerk 



$6,700.00 
6,500.00 
6,200.00 
4,200.00 



$7,400.00 
7,200.00 
6,900.00 
4,900.00 



$7,133.33 
6,933.33 
6,633.33 
4,633.33 



$23,600.00 $26,400.00 $25,333.32 



$8,800.00 
4,200.00 
4,600.00 
5,900.00 
4,400.00 
4,400.00 
4,200.00 
4,800.00 
6,500.00 
5,300.00 
6,800.00 
5,400.00 
5,000.00 
1,200.00 



$9,530.00 
4,900.00 
5,300.00 
6,600.00 
5,100,00 
5,100.00 
4,900.00 
5,500.00 
7,200.00 
6,000.00 
7,500.00 
6,100.00 
5,700.00 
1,312.00 



$9,263.33 
4,633.33 
5,033.33 
6,333.33 
4,833.33 
4,833.33 
4,633.33 
5,233.33 
6,933.33 
5,733.33 
7,233.33 
5,833.33 
5,433.33 
1,312.00 



$71,500.00 $80,742.00 $77,275.29 



66 



BUZZELL SCHOOL 



SEPTEMBER 
1962 



SEPTEMBER 
1963 



JAN. to 
DEC, 1963 



Eileen M. Cannon 

Rose M. Kennedy, Bldg. Prin, 

Margaret Maloney 

Patricia J. Planchet 

Carol B. Sears 

Margaret Reardon 

ROGERS SCHOOL 
Mildred Henry 

Agnes C. Daley, Bldg. Prin. 
Jane E. Foley 
Anne M. 0' Donne 11 



BOUTWELL SCHOOL 



$4,400.00 $5,100.00 $4,833.33 



6,500.00 
6,200.00 
4,200.00 
6,200.00 
4,800.00 



7,200.00 
6,900.00 
4,900.00 
6,900.00 
5,500.00 



6,933.33 
6,633.33 
4,633.33 
6,633.33 
5,233.33 



$32,300.00 $36,500.00 $34,899.98 



$4,600.00 
6,400.00 
4,900.00 
4,400,00 



$5,300.00 
7,100.00 
5,300.00 
5,100.00 



$5,033.33 
6,833.33 
5,033.33 
4,833.33 



$20,300.00 $22,800.00 $21,733.32 



Walter H. Pierce, Sup. Prin. 

David Crittenden 

Judith Green 

Irene C. Klements 

Anne L. McMahon 

Janice Molloy 

Kathleen O'Brien 

Rhea Perry 

Francis V. Sweeney, Bldg. Prin. 

Mary S. Sweet 

Nancy O'Leary 

Carroll Beegan 

Mary A. Brannan 

Rosa Sadowski, P.T. Clerk 

SWAIN SCHOOL 

Sal vat ore R. Albano 
Bemadene M. Haslam 
Pauline Cola 
Mary L. Donahue 
Jane M. Doucette 
Florence G. Liston 
L. Jeannette O'Hearn 

CENTER SCHOOL 



$7,920.00 


$8,650.00 


$8,383.33 


4,700.00 


5,400.00 


5,133.33 


4,600.00 


5,300.00 


5,033.33 


4,800.00 


5,500.00 


5,233.33 


4,600.00 


5,300.00 


5,033.33 


5,000.00 


5,700.00 


5,433.33 


5,700.00 


6,400.00 


6,133.33 


5,400.00 


6,100.00 


5,833.33 


6,000.00 


6,700.00 


6,433.33 


6,000.00 


6,700.00 


6,433.33 


4,200.00 


4,900.00 


4,633.33 


4,400.00 


5,100.00 


4,833.33 


4,200.00 


4,900.00 


4,633.33 


480.00 


1,232.00 


1,232.00 


$68,000.00 


$77,882.00 


$74,415.29 


$4,700.00 


$5,400.00 


$5,133.33 


4,400.00 


5,100.00 


4,833.33 


7,000.00 


7,700.00 


7,433.33 


6,200.00 


6,900.00 


6,633.33 


4,200.00 


4,900.00 


4,633.33 


6,900.00 


7,600.00 


7,333.33 


5,400.00 


6,100.00 


5,833.33 


$38,800.00 


$43,700.00 


$41,833.31 



Leonard E. Gagnon, 
Jane H. Graupner 
Alice M. Hassett 
Suzanne M. Bagnall 



Bldg. Prin. 



$5,500.00 
5,800.00 
5,000.00 
4,200.00 



$6,200.00 
6,500.00 
5,700.00 
4,900.00 



$5,933.33 
6,233.33 
5,433.33 
4,633.33 



$20,500.00 $23,300.00 $22,233.32 



67 



NORTH INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL 

Anthony J. DeLuca, Sup. Prin. 

Paul E. Bodenstein 

James Considine 

Diane DiBerto 

M.7. Helene Dorion 

Gaeteno J. Fratianni 

James F. Jordan 

Kargaret Manners 

Mary P. Mogan 

Gertrude M. Murphy 

Francis P. Nolan 

Myvna A. Ruderman 

Irene H. Rogers 

Cornelia A. Spencer 

Constance Smith 

Nancy Stouffer 

Janet Jillette 

Janet A. Connolly, P.T. Clerk 



WEST SCHOOL 
Isabelle A. Burns 



SEPTEMBER 


SEPTEMBER 


JAN. to 


1962 


1963 


DEC, 1963 


$8,800.00 


$9,530.00 


$9,263.33 


6,100.00 


6,800.00 


6,533.33 


4,400.00 


5,100.00 


4,833.33 


4,400.00 


5,100.00 


4,833.33 


4,900.00 


5,600.00 


5,333,33 


5,100.00 


5,800.00 


5,533.33 


4,800.00 


5,500.00 


5,233.33 


4,500.00 


5,200.00 


4,933.33 


6,500.00 


7,200.00 


6,933,33 


5,100.00 


5,600.00 


5,333.33 


5,200.00 


5,900. 00 


5, 633. 33 


4,200.00 


4,900.00 


4,633.33 


6,500.00 


7,200.00 


6,933.33 


4,600.00 


5,300.00 


5,033.33 


4,800.00 


5,500.00 


5,233.33 


4,600.00 


5,300.00 


5,033.33 


4,600.00 


5,300.00 


5,033.33 


1,200.00 


1,968.00 


1,968.00 


$90,300.00 


$102,798.00 


$98,264.61 


$7,300.00 


$8,100.00 


$7,766.66 



ADDITIONAL PERSONNEL - SEPTEMBER* 1963 



New Teachers (8) 
Masters Degrees (3) 
Accounting Service 
Differentials Traveling Teachers 
Additional Coaches 
Part-time Nurse 



$40,000.00 $13,333.33 



900.00 
1,000.00 
500.00 
225.00 
2,700.00 



300,00 
1,00000 
500 00 
225 . 00 
900.00 



$45,325.00 $16,258.33 



68 



Maintenance Department 



Boutwell School: 

Build and install cabinets in teachers' room 
All new locks installed on closets and doors 
Install seven new pumps and one new motor on 

heater 
Overhaul heater 
Tar all flashing on roof 
Build work bench for boiler room 
Clean and overhaul burner 
Install new controls on hot water heater 
Replace putty on all windows 



High School (continued): 

Paint frame in glass block window in stairway near 

Roman House 
Balance Johnson controls throughout the building 

annually 
Paint all outside doors 
Replaster wall in Room 219 
Refinish tables in Room 109 
Replace tile on second floor 
Paint ducts in boys' and girls' locker room 
Repack all pumps in the school 



Buzzell School: 



North Intermediate School: 



Make classrooms ready for movable furniture, sand, 

seal, three coats in four rooms 
Paint toilet areas - two coats 

Center School: 



Install copper tubing on water pipes 
Install two outside sill cocks 
Check window cords 

Install new low water cut-out on boiler 
Glen Road School: 



Install curtains in skylights of eight classrooms 
Paint outside laminated beams 
Build and install vent in kitchen roof 
Tar all flashings 

High School: 

Install heating unit in Metal Shop 
Repair permanent bleachers 
Reline two boilers 

Install new hot water heater in Home Economics 
room 

All windows in high school - washed inside and out 

All filters in school - washed and oiled 

Boilers and burners serviced 

Stairway railings painted 

Point all cracks in entire school 

Reseal all doors in second wing 

Recheck fire walls in all boilers 



Make and install all room numbers and classroom 
name signs 

Install all toilet paper, paper towel, and soap 

dispensers 
Assemble all shop benches and lockers 
Build maple top table and potato rack for cafeteria 
Make twelve "no parking" signs 
Build twenty-four space letter rack 
Build and install five pin-up boards 
Build and install twenty-two by six feet high 

shelving in Band Room 
Install moving picture screen in Cafetorium 
Build three television stands 

Roman House: 



>> 

5 
J 

o 

5 



Scrape and paint one coat of house, and scrape and 

paint two coats of maintenance shop 
Repair and tar roof 

Install electrical outlets in two offices 
Paint all rooms 
Varnish all woodwork 
Seal all floors 

Mildred Rogers School: 

Paint entire inside of building 

Rebuild and cover the back door with metal 

Install sump pump in boiler room 

Install copper valleys on roof over front door 



69 



Swain School: 



West School: 



Three new skylights, new flashing, new vent pipe, 

and patch roof 
Put in new ceiling strapping, wire lath, and plaster 

in gym 

Three new ceiling lights installed in gym 
Install two outside sill cocks 
Make six cellar screens 
Cover fire exit door with tin 
Check all windows and sash cords 

Walker School: 



Paint outside of building 

Paint entire inside of building 

Landscape school grounds 

Hot top driveway and parking area 

Install cabinets and closet on first floor to store 

custodial supplies 
Install new roof over boys' toilet 
Install copper tubing - cellar water line and two 

outside sill cocks 
Repair latch on basement door 
Install new low water cut-out on boiler 
Build coffee bar and table for teachers' room 

Whitefield School: 



In July we set twenty- seven lights of glass 

Install tile flooring in front entrance 

Install book shelves in Room 4 

Paint cafeteria and all tables and benches 

Install seven new fluorescent fixtures in hallways 



Paint and repair front steps 
Clean and overhaul boiler 
Build special therapy toys 

Wildwood School: 

Paint outside trim and window frames - two coats 
Repair roof - install new flashing on skylights and 

drain pipes 
Paint library 

Replace asbestos on boilers, and paint 
Miscellaneous: 

In addition, the following items were completed in/ 
on all buildings in the system: 

Cleaned and overhauled boilers on hot water systerr 

All pin-up boards repainted 

All school warning signs painted 

All chalk boards cleaned and treated 

All wooden platforms and steps treated with a 

protective coat of preservative 
All windows washed 

All septic tanks checked, and cleaned when 

nece s sary 
All storerooms inspected and cleaned 
All schools inspected for sand and rock salt 
All schools inspected for fire protection 
All fire extinguishers checked and recharged 
All window glass replaced throughout the system 

when necessary 
All fire detectors checked and repaired 



70 



Jury List 



(Revised - August 15, 1962) 



Name 


Re sidence 


Occupation 


Abate, Louis A. 


37 Glen Road 


Grounds Keeper 


Ahern, Donald A. 


94 Glen Road 


Electronic Technician 


• ! Altman, Sadie K. 


77 Church Street 


Housewife 


*App, Margaret M. 


855 Main Street 


Housewife 


Ardolino, Ernest E. 


Broad Street 


Supervisor 


Ayotte, Francis L. 


45 Glen Road 


Mach. Shop Supervisor 


Babine, Helen V. 


56 High Street 


Assistant Cook 


Barry, Leo G. 


8 Chandler Road 


Accounting Analyst 


Barry, Richard V. 


Longview Road 


Senior Engineer 


Belbin, Lloyd W. 


6 Morse Avenue 


Telephone Repairman 


■•'Berry, Alice T. 


97 Nichols Street 


Housewife 


■'Bertwell, Florence E. 


343 Chestnut Street 


Housewife 


*Black, Pauline R. 


84 Church Street 


Housewife 


Blake, Arnold C. 


90 Middlesex Avenue 


Professional Engineer 


*Blake, Helen C. 


95 Clark Street 


Housewife 


Blake, James D. 


95 Clark Street 


Credit Clerk 


Bromander, Sidney J. 


1 Hilltop Road 


Machinist 


Buck, Mildred H. 


295 Woburn Street 


Assistant 


*Burke, Dorothy A. 


10 Westdale Avenue 


Telephone Operator 


Burns, Robert A. 


2 Lockwood Road 


Warehouseman 


Bussell, Howard A. 


5 Catherine Avenue 


Auto mechanic 


*Butt, Mabel 


6 West Street 


Housewife 


Camber, G. Earle 


410 Chestnut Street 


Maint. Machinist 


*Carnes, Leonora 


512 Woburn Street 


Supervisor 


Carter , John E . 


15 Railroad Avenue 


Stockman 


Casey, Helen R . 


2 Main Street 


Switchboard Operator 


Clinch, Ethel J. 


67 Chestnut Street 


At home 


Connelly, John C. 


12 Westdale Avenue 


Pipefitter 


Coursey, C. Homer 


3 Wing Road 


Asst. Section Head 


■'Cromwell, Effie L. 


35 Adams Street 


Stock Clerk 


*Crotty, Clara E. 


6 Silverhurst Ave. 


Housewife 


Croke, Thomas F. 


106 Glen Road 


Treasurer Machine Shop 


Cullen, William H. Jr. 


15 Glen Road 


Public Inform. Rep. 


Currier, Ralph R. 


18 Boutwell Street 


R etir ed 


^Darling, Dorothy E. 


124 Eames Street 


Housewife 


Davey, James J. 


10 Fairmeadow Road 


Teletype Repairman 


Davis, Lauretta J. 


23 Jones Avenue 


Housekeeper 


'Dawe, Marguerite M. 


39 Columbia Street 


Asst. Teacher 


Dayton, William P. 


214 Burlington Ave. 


Senior Electrical Designer 


Derby, Ralph F. Jr. 


207 Wildwood Street 


Department Head 


'Doerfler, Betty Jane 


459 Salem Street 


Quality Control Inspector 


Doucette, Henry O. 


31 Ballardvale Street 


Part-time bookkeeper 


Duggan, W. Paul 


4 Harvard Avenue 


General Chairman - Labor 



: indicates married woman 



71 



JURY LIST: 



Name 

Durkee, James J. 
Enos, Peter 
Everett, Warren E. Jr. 
Faulkner, Cora E. 
Fenlon, Beatrice E. 
Fielding, Doris M. 
Foley, Philip M. 

♦ Gaskill, Kathleen M. 
Gouvea, John Jr. 
Graham, Ernest M. 

*Gratcyk, Ruth M. 

Ham, Francis N. Jr. 
*Hartnett, Mary T . 

Higginbotham, Madeline B. 

Hoban, Cecelia E. 
*Johnson, Mary J. 

Kavanaugh, Paul W. 

Keane, Richard E. 
*Kelley, Helen B. 

Kleynen, Louis L. Jr. 

LaDow, Chester F. 

Laffin, Aubrey L. 

Lally, Joseph A. 

Landers, David T. 

Lapper, John C. 
*LaRivee, Marjorie E. 
p £ Lawler, Walter A. 

• " Leavitt, Kenneth R. 

LeBlanc, Edgar 

Lingenfelter , George G. Jr 

Lister, Gordon K. 

Mack, Henry S. 

MacFeeley, Angus B. 

MacFeeley, Patricia A. 
j Magee, William F. 

Maser, Harold R. 

McClure, Raymond G. 

McCormick, William J. 

McDermott, Richard E. 
*McMahon, Viola J. 

Moore s, Allan W. 
*Moores, Mildred 
*Mosey, Evelyn B. 

Myrstad, Birger 

Nickerson, Charles P. 

Oberg, Carl H. Jr. 
♦O'Neill, Ruth E. 

Page, Ruth M. 

Paglia, Joseph A. 

Palmer, Douglas 

Pearson, Arthur W. 

Peterson, Catherine D. 

* indicates married woman 



Re sidence 



500 Salem Street 
8 Hillside Way 

5 Ferguson Road 
224 Shawsheen Ave. 
47 Burnap Street 

1 1 1 West Street 
Westdale Avenue 
17 Beacon Street 

33 Woburn Street 
49 Lawrence Street 

34 Grove Ave. 
McDonald Road 
111 Woburn Street 
33 Adams Street 
16 School Street 
Bellevue Avenue 

14 Kelly Road 

6 North Street 

424 Middlesex Avenue 
288 Salem Street 

3 Ledgewood Road 
1 1 Veranda Avenue 
1 1 High Street 

88 Clark Street 
20 Glendale Circle 
64 Concord Street 
1 5 Swain Road 
41 Pleasant Street 
6 Parker Street 
Concord Street 
27 Woburn Street 
6 Hathaway Road 
43 Burnap Street 
43 Burnap Street 
402 Chestnut Street 

100 Clark Street 
99 Chestnut Street 
Kilmarnock Street 
1 Arlene Avenue 

15 Floradale Avenue 
Westdale Avenue 
Westdale Avenue 

1 1 Lawrence Street 
Ballardvale Street 
738 Woburn Street 
Perry Ave. Ext. 

4 Cypress Street 
1 6 Deming Way 

101 Nichols Street 
124 West Street 
22 Dakdale Road 
119 Grove Avenue 



72 



Occupation 

Pharmacist 
Machinist 
Planner 
Packer 

Telephone Operator 
At home 

Marine Pipefitter 
Housewife 

Asst. Master Mechanic 
Project Engineer 
Housewife 
Sr. Research Technician 
Housewife 
Retired 
Housewife 
Housewife 
General Accountant 
Inside Sales 
Housewife 
Route Foreman 
Tumbler 
Maintenance 
Engineman H&P 
General Insurance Agent 
Draftsman 
Secretary 
Project Technician 
Sale sman 
Artist Draftsman 
Industrial Health Directc 
Supervisor 

Co-ord. Engineer & Sup: 
Sheet Metal Assembly 
Legal Secretary 
Builder 

Offset Pressman 

Data Processing Analyst 

Welder 

Journeyman Cable Splice 

Housewife 

Accountant 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Fish Cutter 

Milk Salesman 

Lab. Technician 

Housewife 

Unemployed 

Tool & Gage Inspector 

Retired 

Senior Electronics Tech 
Cashier 



JURY LIST: 



Name 

#Pike, Emma D. 

Razey, Donald F. 

Reynolds, Helen M. 
^Richard, Lydia 

Ring, John S. 
*Seddon, Dorothy I. 
*Sidelinker, Eva 

Sullivan, Edward J. 

Sutton, Theodore 

Syvertson, Roy C. Jr. 

Tarricone, Ralph E. 

Tuttle, Frank H. 

Vadaiksa, John F. 

Visconti, Anna M. 

Walsh, Michael J. 

Watters, James G. 

Waugh, John J. 

Webb, William R. 

Webster, David H. 

Webster, George L. 

Weed, John E. 

Welch, Robert E. 

Whalen, James J. 
*Whalen, Margaret E. 
*Whitmarsh, Beulah M. 

Wicks, Lydia G. 

Witherspoon, William E. 
*Worby, Mary A. 

Young, Ruth M. 

* indicates married woman 



Residence 

Westdale Avenue 
85 Church Street 
833 Woburn Street 
Taft Road 
277 Middlesex Ave. 
40 Oakdale Road 
72 Main Street 
38 Grove Avenue 

4 Sewell Road 

211 Wildwood Street 
1 1 Clark Street 
2 Carson Avenue 
Dartmouth Avenue 
22 Nassau Avenue 

5 Dorothy Avenue 
25 Grant Street 
36 Lowell Street 
59 Lowell Street 
14 Dorothy Avenue 
52 Andover Street 

2 Cunningham Street 
8 Hamlin Lane 
Birchwood Road 

32 Shady Lane Drive 

3 Longview Road 
27 Parker Street 
17 Swain Road 

316 Middlesex Avenue 
430 Middlesex Avenue 



Occupation 

Housewife 
Shipper 
Payroll Clerk 
Housewife 
Welder 

Practical Nurse 
Shoe Packer 

Newspaper Correspondent 
Warehouse Manager 
Sheet Metal Mechanic 
Ironworker 

Senior Design Checker 

House Painter 

Claim Clerk 

Electrician 

Material Handler 

Sales 

Manager 

Electrical Designer 

Printing Salesman 

Maint. Electronic Equip. 

Engineer 

Supervisor 

Supervisor 

Housewife 

Transister Tester 

Retired 

Rating Dept. 

Receptionist -typist 



Constable 



I herewith submit my annual report as a Constable of the Town of Wilmington for the year ending 1962. I 
have posted Notices and Warrants for the Annual Town Meeting, Special Town Meetings, State Primary, 
and State Election in accordance with the By-laws of the Town of Wilmington. I have also served and posted 
Notices for other Departments and Officers of the Town of Wilmington. 



73 



The Town of Wilmington shared and directly benefited from the first canal of importance that was built in — 
the United States - the old Middlesex Canal. 

Water still lies in the bed of the canal for a distance of about half a mile between Burlington and Shaw sheen 
Avenues. The tow path, clearly visible today and utilized in its time by the electric road that operated 
between Wilmington and Billerica, is to be found just south of the Gillis Lock location and the tavern, a 
long two- story frame dwelling overlooked by the Shawsheen Avenue bridge which was occupied at a later 
date by Mrs. Annie B. Carter. 

The Middlesex Canal extended from the Mill Pond at Charlestown, through the Town of Wilmington, to a 
junction with the Merrimack River at Middlesex Village in the Town of Chelmsford, (now Lowell) and gives 
evidence of the early struggle of our people to improve and extend the economy affecting Boston and its 
environs. 



74 



Patch's Meadow, where today the young folk of Wilmington skate, is bound by the tow path of the Middlesex 
Canal and forms a storage basin where "luggage boats" were moored while waiting to receive freight. With 
a tow line securely snubbed around the iron rod wrought into the stone the boatmen tied their boats. 

Firewood and lumber; white oak and pine timber used in shipbuilding at Medford; granite from Tyngsboro, 
and agricultural products from Wilmington and a great extent of fertile country to the north found their way 
along the canal to Boston, while the return boats supplied taverns and country stores with their annual 
stock of goods. 

"Luggage boats" were those used exclusively for freight, and they were required to make two miles and a 
half an hour. The "Passage boats" were those carrying passengers, and they attained a speed of four miles 
an hour. 

Lumber was transported in rafts about 75 feet long and 9 feet wide. These rafts were often united in 
"bands", and the number forming a "band" was limited to ten. 

The "Passage boats" and most of those for "luggage" were drawn by one or more horses but the rafts were 
drawn by oxen. 



75 



Accepted Streets 



Street 



From 



To 



** Miles Feet Date(s) Accepted 



Adams Street 
Ainsworth Road 
Aldrich Road 
Andover Street 
Auburn Avenue 
Ayotte Street 

Baker Street 
Ballardvale Street 
Bancroft Street 
Beacon Street 
Beech Street 
Beeching Avenue 
Belmont Avenue 
Birchwood Road 
Boutwell Street 
Brand Avenue 
Brattle Street 
Brentwood Avenue 
Bridge Lane 
Broad Street 
Burlington Avenue 
Burnap Street 



Middlesex Ave. 
Woburn Street 
Shaw sheen Ave. 
Salem Street 
Shaw sheen Ave. 
Westdale Ave. 

Brand Avenue 
Salem Street 
Liberty Street 
Church Street 
Burlington Ave. 
Cunnin^r jrn Street 
Columbia Street 
Judith Road 
Aldrich Road 
Bridge Lane 
Massachusetts Ave. 
Woodside Avenue 
Main Street 
Carmel Street 
Main Street 
Grove Avenue 



Parker Street 
Town land 
Billerica Line 
Andover Line 



4600 
2600 



Andover Line 
B & M R. R. 
Belmont Avenue 
Byron Street 
Faulkner Avenue 
State Street 
Short Street 
Burlington Ave. 
Baker Street 
Garden Avenue 
Woburn Street 
Shaw sheen Ave. 
Both Ways 
Burlington Line 
Winchell Road 



1. 2 

2. 3 



2. 7 



0. 8 



0. 3 



1. 6 



800 
800 

700 

400 
1000 
1000 

450 
1000 
1550 

2370 
1100 
907 

1377 

1378 



3-02-08 
6-05-61 
1 1-06-94 
1 1-06-94 
3-12-45 
3-10-47 

3-12-45 

1 1-06-94 
3-17-52 
3-01-15 
3-10-47 
3-14-59 
3-03-33 
3-17-52 

1 1-06-94 
3-13-33 
3-12-45 
6-21-38 

11-06-94 
3-13-54 

1 1-06-94 
3-12-45 



3-10-53 
3-12-60 
3-08-43 



3-10-53 



76 



ACCEPTED STREETS: 



Street 


From 


To 1 


Mile s 


Feet 


Date(s) Accepted 


Burt Road 


Cedar Street 


Fall Street 






2500 


3-12-45 


3-11- 


46 


Butters Row 


Main Street 


Chestnut Street 


0. 


6 




1 1-06-94 






Canal Street 


Shaw sheen Avenue 


Burt Road 






1511 


10-16-39 


3-12- 


55 


Carolyn Road 


North Street 


Linda Road 






950 


3-12-60 






Carson Avenue 


Hathaway Road 


Both Ways 






677 


3-10-53 


3-12- 


55 


Carson Ave. Ext. 


Marie Drive 








-5U0 


3-11-61 






Carter Lane 


Shawsheen Avenue 








1 400 


3-09-57 






Cedar Street 


Harris Street 


Burt Road 






600 


3-12-45 






Central Street 


Middlesex Avenue 


Church Street 






574 


10-16-50 






Chandler Road 


Kelly Road 


Adams Street 






400 


3-09-57 






Chapman Avenue 


Hathaway Road 








322 


3-05-51 






Chase Road 


Hathaway Road 








297 


3-10-53 






Chestnut Street 


Burlington Avenue 


Woburn Line 


2. 


1 




1 1 -06-94 






Church Street 


Main Street 


Middlesex Ave. 


0. 


8 




11-06-94 






Clark Street 


Main Street 


Church Street 


0. 


8 




1 1-06-94 






Cochrane Road 


Forest Street 


Warren Road 






800 


3-10-47 






Columbia Street 


Church Street 


Talbot Avenue 


0. 


1 




3-02-08 


3-13- 


33 


Concord Street 


Federal Street 


N. Reading Line 


1. 


1 




1 1-06-94 






Congress Street 


Forest Street 


Burlington Line 






965 


10-16-39 






Cook Avenue 


Main Street 


Kensington Ave. 






1000 


3-11-46 






Coolidge Road 


Hathaway Road 








270 


3-05-51 






Corey Avenue 


Grand Street 


Canal Street 






370 


3-05-51 






Cottage Street 


Main Street 








920 


3-13-54 






Cross Street 


Main Street 


Lowell Street 






900 


11-06-94 






Cunningham Street 


Salem Street 


Beeching Avenue 






2320 


3/44 3/52 


3/53 




Cypress Street 


Glen Road 








260 


3-05-51 







77 



ACCEPTED STREETS: 



Street 


From 


To 


Mile s 


Feet 


Date(s) Acce 


pted 




Davis Street 


Main Street 








500 


3-17-52 








Dayton Road 


Hathaway Road 








170 


3-05-51 








Dell Drive 


Burlington Ave. 








450 


3-08-58 








Dobson Street 


Glen Road 


Cary Street 






1402 


3-13-54 








Dorchester Street 


Billerica Line 








1 400 


3-05-51 








Dorothy Avenue 


Barbara Avenue 


Arlene Avenue 






IDDO 


3- l£-ou 








Draper Drive 


Gunderson Road 








100 


3-14-59 








Dublin Avenue 


Main Street 








500 


3-05-51 








Dunton Road 


Nassau Avenue 


Both Ways 






638 


3-10-56 








Eames Street 


Main Street 


Woburn Street 


0. 


7 




1 1 -Uo-94 








Edwards Road 


Forest Street 


Baldwin Road 






450 


3- 10-47 








Emerson Street 


Oakwood Road 


Faulkner Avenue 






600 


3-05-51 








Fairfield Avenue 


Main Street 








1300 


3-11-46 








Fairmeadow Road 


Nichols Street 


Nichols Street 






2328 


3-08-58 








Fairview Avenue 


State Street 








650 


3-13-33 








Faneuil Drive 


Massachusetts Ave. 








1000 


10- 1 6-50 








Faulkner Avenue 


Glen Road 


W. Jamaica Ave. 






267 1 


3 - 1 3 - 44 


3- 


10 


-53 


Fay Street 


Glen Road 


Cary Street 






700 


6-21-38 


3- 


1Z 


-45 


Federal Street 


Middlesex Avenue 


Woburn Street 


1. 


1 




1 1-06-94 








Forest Street 


Aldrich Road 


Burlington Ave. 


0. 


8 




11-06-94 








Glen Road 


Main Street 


Middlesex Ave. 


1. 


3 




1 1-06-94 








Glendale Circle 


Glen Road 


Glen Road 






1300 


3-17-52 








Glenview Road 


Suncrest Avenue 








360 


3-14-59 








Gowing Road 


Park Street 


Marcus Road 






900 


3-10-56 








Grand Street 


Shaw sheen Avenue 


Dunmore Road 






850 


3-17-52 









78 



HfflHHHRlH 



ACCEPTED STREETS: 



Street 


From 


To 


Miles 


Feet 


Date(s) Accepted 


Grant Street 


Federal Street 


B & M R. R. 






780 


3-08-43 




Grove Avenue 


Main Street 


Lake Street 


0. 


4 




9-29-10 




Gunderson Road 


Hathaway Road 


Both Ways 






1081 


3-14-59 




Hamlin Lane 


Lawrence Street 








558 


3/10/62 




Hardin Street 


Aldrich Road 


Lubbers Brook 






250 


3-05-51 




Harnden Street 


Main Street 


Glen Road 


0. 


1 




3-04-95 




Harris Street 


Burlington Avenue 


Cedar Street 






700 


3-12-45 




Harvard Avenue 


Main Street 


River Street 






430 


3-05-51 




Hathaway Road 


Woburn Street 


Gunderson Road 






1858 


3/51 3/53 


3/59 


Hawthorne Road 


Woburn Street 








230 


3-10-56 




High Street 


Middlesex Ave. 


Woburn Street 


0. 


5 




11-06-94 




Hillside Way 


Chestnut Street 


Burlington Line 


0. 


5 




3-02-14 




Hilltop Road 
Hobson Avenue 


Suncrest Avenue 
Pine Avenue 


150 feet beyond 
Wiser Street 






364 
1520 


3-14-59 
3/45 3/51 


3/52 


Hopkins Street 


Shaw sheen Ave. 


Billerica Line 


0. 


5 




1 1-06-94 




Jaquith Road 


Shaw sheen Ave. 








1250 


3-08-48 


3/49 3/51 


Jones Avenue 


Glen Road 








719 


6-10-40 




Judith Road 


Birchwood Road 


Cedar Crest Road 






520 


3-10-53 




Kelly Road 


Adams Street 








923 


3-09-57 




Kendall Street 


Aldrich Road 


Blanchard Road 






1300 


3-12-45 




Kiernan Avenue 


Main Street 








693 


3-08-58 




Kilmarnock Street 


West Street 


Reading Line 


0. 


5 




11-06-94 




King Street 


Glen Road 


Broad Street 






2400 


6-10-40 


3-12-45 


Kirk Street 


Main Street 








572 


3-05-51 





79 



II 



ACCEPTED STREETS: 



Street 



From 



To 



Miles Feet 



Date(s) Accepted 



Lake Street 
Lang Street 
Laurel Avenue 
Lawrence Court 
Lawrence Street 
Ledgewood Road 
Liberty Street 
Lincoln Street 
Linda Road 
Lloyd Road 
Lockwood Road 
Longview Road 
Lowell Street 
Lowell Street Park 

Mackey Road 
Main Street 
Marcus Road 
Marcia Road 
Marie Drive 
Marion Street 
Marjorie Road 
Massachusetts Ave. 
McDonald Road 
Meadow Lane 
Middlesex Avenue 
Miles Street 



Main Street 
Bancroft Street 
Malloy Road 
Lawrence Street 
Glendale Circle 
Suncrest Avenue 
Federal Street 
Federal Street 
High Street 
Main Street 
Ballardvale Street 
Middlesex Avenue 
Main Street 
Station 7+50 

Federal Street 
Tewksbury Line 
Gowing Road 
North Street 
Woburn Street 
Burlington Avenue 
Main Street 
Main Street 
Salem Street 
Suncrest Avenue 
Main Street 
Main Street 



Shaw sheen Ave. 
B & M R. R. 
Parker Street 

Shady Lane Drive 

B & M R. R. 
B & M R. R. 



1.0 



Reading Line 
Station 14 + 50 



Woburn Line 
Gowing Road 

Thrush Road 



St. Paul Street 



Salem Street 
Hobson Avenue 



1.9 



4. 



400 
657 
683 
3773 
383 
740 
720 
1780 
1050 
990 
650 



2. 3 



250 

2315 
1130 
1285 

900 
1550 

800 
1424 

363 

400 



1 1-06-94 

3-17-52 
10-16-50 

3-10-56 

3-10-56 

3-14-59 

3-08-43 

3-08-43 

10- 16-50 
3-05-51 
3-09-57 
3-14-59 

11- 06-94 
1908 & 1957 

3-08-43 
1 1-06-94 

3-08-58 

3-10-62 

3-11-61 

3-12-45 

3-05-51 

3-12-45 

3-13-44 

3-09-57 
11-06-94 

3-12-45 



80 



ACCEPTED STREETS: 



JL I CCL 


F r om 


To 


Miles 


Feet 


1—/ d I C \ D / -il \_ C c 


pted 




JVlillCi AUdU 


VJ1CU Iv UqU 


Th^ yy~\ P» T* C T~l f r ppt 
1— i II1C 1 D Ull Jll CCL 








J - 1L-TJ 








XXnr A T^P nil P 
1V1 Ul oC Ji. V CI1UC 


\KT o Vi i i y "Pi ^ t" rppt 
VV UU UI 11 JL1 CCL 








1361 


1 VJ — 1 U ~ J 7 








\r eti r A t r p t*i 1 1 p 
iVl y OLIL il V C 11 UC 


1 nnl P QPY A \/" T~l 1 1 P 1 
1 VI 1 U Ul C O C -A- V C 11 uc 








5P8 










Nassau Avenue 


Shawsheen Avenue 


Decatur Street 






2000 


3-11-46 








T\Iii"Vin1 c ^trppt 

IN 1L . llUlo Jl 1 CCU 


^!Vi a w qVi^^ti Avptiup 

J 1 i CL w one v 1 1 i i v \^ iiuc 


Vi ^ \jj qVippti R i vpr 
j u cl w one e 1 1 i \ i v c i 


0. 


7 




1 1 -06-94 








Ni r Up t* Qnn A vptiup 

IN 1L, I\C 1 3UU V C11UC 


We <?t Street 

T T t, O L 1 — ' LI L. L 1, 








900 


3- 10-47 








T\Jnrfo1W StT^pf 

1 "4 \J i 1 \J 1 IN. lJ LI C C I 


N_« CL 1 1 J i O. 1 1 C 


T^J 3 ccaii AvPTllIP 

1 1 O. O O CL U V CllUv 






538 


3-13-54 








liUI 111 Jl 1 CCL 


\A i HH1 p qp y Avpnnp 

IVl 1UU1C 3 C A V C 1 1 UC 


D^Hpint Drivp 

J — ' CL VI CL 11 L J — ' 11VC 






3533 


3-12-45 


3- 


13- 


54 


Oak Street 


Salem Street 








350 


3-19-51 








vai\uaic J. \ uau 


Tndith Road 

<_luil>ii iwau 


1 ' 11 \J 1 L vj 11 \Z e L 






2280 


10-16-50 








Op V t* i Hop P.i rrlp 


C~tO\x/ i n o RnaH 

W X 11 k 1A UC1U 


r~rO\x/ 1 n O R OA H 

> — J \J W lilt' L \ \J CL U 






1730 


3-08-58 








\y a. w v_l x\ UaU 


IVl dill Jll CCL 


x dii i iciu nvciiuc 






850 


3- 1 1 -46 








(jl enn Q f o f 

V_/l 3U11 Jll CCl 


C^. Vi 1 1 T" Vi Qfrppt 

11 Ul U U Jll CCL 








1 32 


3-09-57 








Park Street 


Woburn Street 


N. Reading Line 


n 
U . 


Q 

7 




11-06-94 








Parker Street 


Lowell Street 


Blackstone Street 


U . 


1 L 
J O 




3-04-07 


5 - 


1)3 - 


19 


Patricia Circle 


Dell Drive 


Dell Drive 






595 


3-08-58 








Pershing Street 


Federal Street 


B & M R. R. 






720 


3-08-43 








Phillips Avenue 


Wiser Street 


Wild Avenue 






1800 


3-1 1-46 


•J 

J - 


1 "2 

13- 


54 


Pilling Road 


Hathaway Road 


Both ways 






930 


3-14-59 








Pine Avenue 


Main Street 


Hobson Avenue 






400 


3-12-45 








Pineridge Road 


North Street 


Linda Road 






900 


3-12-60 








Pineview Road 


Lipp Street 


Adelman Road 






450 


3-10-53 








Pinewood Road 


Birchwood Road 


Shady Lane Drive 






1332 


3-13-54 








Pleasant Road 


Middlesex Avenue 


Linda Road 






750 


3-10-62 








Powder House Circle 


Middlesex Avenue 








730 


3-13-54 









8 1 



ACCEPTED STREETS: 



Street 


From 


To 


Mile s 


Feet 


Date(s) Accepted 


Railroad Avenue 


Clark Street 


Stone Street 





2 




3-01-09 






Ridge Road 


Suncrest Avenue 








365 


3-10-56 






River Street 


Massachusetts Avenue 


Harvard Avenue 






440 


3-10-62 






Rollins Road 


Fenway Street 


Marion Street 






200 


3-13-54 






Roosevelt Road 


Boutwell Street 


Burlington Avenue 






2000 


3-1 1-46 






Royal Street 


Salem Street 








1040 


3-05-51 






Salem Street 


Tewksbury Line 


N. Reading Line 


2 


7 




1 1-06-94 


3-05 


-06 


School Street 


Middlesex Avenue 


High School Lot 






616 


3-01-15 






Sewell Road 


Hathaway Road 








380 


3-12-55 






Shady Lane Drive 


Middlesex Avenue 


Lawrence Street 






2676 


3-08-58 






Shaw sheen Avenue 


Main Street 


Billerica Line 


2. 


2 




11-06-94 






Sheridan Road 


Hathaway Road 








487 


3-05-51 






Silver Lake Avenue 


Lake Street 


Dexter Street 






455 


3-13-54 






Sprucewood Road 


Shady Lane Drive 


Short Street 






600 


3-17-52 






State Street 


Belmont Avenue 


Fairview Avenue 






275 


3-03-33 






Strout Avenue 


Lowell Street 








686 


3-17-55 






Suncrest Avenue 


West Street 








1246 


3-13-54 






Swain Road 


Forest Street 


Burlington Ave. 


0. 


4 




•3-20-22 


10-16- 


-29 




Taft Road 


Burlington Ave. 


Boutwell Street 






3237 


6-21-38 








Taplin Avenue 


Hobson Avenue 


Lubbers Brook 






900 


3- 1 1-46 








Temple Street 


Church Street 








274 


6-06-1 1 








Thrush Road 


Salem Street 


Marie Drive 






400 


3-11-61 








Thurston Avenue 


Church Street 




0. 


2 




3-04-07 








Truman Road 


Hathaway Road 








300 


3-10-53 








Upton Court 


Andover Street 




0. 


1 




1 1-06-94 









82 



ACCEPTED STREETS: 



Street 



From 



To 



Miles Feet 



Date(s) Accepted 



Veranda Avenue 
Virginia Road 

Walker Street 
Warren Road 
Washington Ave. 
West Street 
Westdale Avenue 
Wightman Road 
Wild Avenue 
Wildwood Street 
Williams Avenue 
Wilson Street 
Winchell Road 
Wing Road 
Wiser Street 
Woburn Street 
Woodlawn Avenue 



Main Street 

N. Reading Line 

Main Street 
Lake St. , Tewksbury 
Clark Street 
Woburn Street 
West Street 
Warren Road 
Grove Avenue 
Middlesex Avenue 
Main Street 
Federal Street 
Grove Avenue 
Woburn Street 
Main Street 
Andover Street 
Border Avenue 



Lubbers Brook 



Chase Street 
Reading Line 
B & M R. R. 
Albert Street 
B & M R. R. 
Woburn Street 

B & M R. R. 
Burnap Street 

Taplin Avenue 
Woburn Line 
Kensington Ave. 



0. 3 

1. 7 



0. 2 

1. 1 



4. 2 



1076 
1200 

423 
100 



121 1 
230 



693 
760 
200 
746 
900 

250 



3-06-16 
3-13-54 

3-08-58 
3-13-54 
3-01-20 

1 1- 06-94 
6-22-42 
3-13-54 

12- 29-10 
1 1-06-94 

6-10-40 
3-08-43 
3-12-45 
3-08-58 

10- 16-50 

11- 06-94 
3-17-52 



83 



Housing Authority 



Organization: 



The Wilmington Housing Authority is authorized by the General Laws, Chapter 121, Section Z6K, as 

amended. 



Members: 



Edwin F. Forrest, Chairman James P. Donahue, Assistant Treasurer 

Ernest B. Rice, Vice Chairman Edward J Curtis, Secretary and Representative of 

Ralph D. Peterson, Treasurer State Housing Board 



Statutory Reference: 



1. Housing Authority Law: Section 261 to 26CCC inclusive, of Chapter 121 of the General Laws, as 
amended. 

2. Act to Provide Housing for Veterans: Chapter 200 of the Acts of 1948, as amended. 

3. Act to Provide Housing for Elderly Persons of Low Income: Chapter 667 of the Acts of 1954, 
as amended. 



Veteran's Housing: 

5i 

fl Location - Wildwood Street Number of Units - 13 Average Rent - $66. 00 

Rentals are based on the income of the veteran. This Project is entirely for veterans of the low-income 
'. - group of greatest need, who have been living under poor housing conditions. It allows the veteran to live 

in decent, safe, and sanitary housing at a rent he can afford. 

Housing for the Elderly: 

' Location - Deming Way Number of Units - 40 Rent - $48. 00 

Requirements for occupancy of these units is that a person must be sixty-five (65) years of age or over and 
must be of low income. Persons must also be in need of good housing. 

Balance Sheet as of March 31. 1962 

Liabilities 



667-1 Administration 

Assets 



Administration Fund 3, 656. 11 

Petty Cash 20. 00 

Accounts Receivable 30. 20 

Accounts Receivable, S. A. 3, 593. 75 

Mechanics Savings Bank 20, 116. 67 

Development Cost 575, 000. 00 

Total 602,416.73 



Accounts Payable - Development 

Accrued Insurance 

Prepaid Rent 

Operating Reserve 

Accrued Interest 

Matured Int. & Principal 

Debt Service Reserve 

Bonds Authorized 

Surplus 

Total 



10, 127. 09 
320. 89 
192. 00 
10, 079. 51 
480. 12 
4, 750. 00 
475. 00 
575, 000. 00 
601, 424. 61 
992. 12 
602, 416. 73 



84 



Balance Sheet as of June 30, 1962 



200-1 

Assets Liabilities 



Administration Fund 






3, 601. 


32 


Accrued Pilot 








73. 


70 


Petty Cash 






20. 


00 


Matured Interest & Principal 






132. 


82 


Reading Cooperative 


Bank 




2, 000. 


00 


Security Deposit 








725. 


00 


Mechanics Savings 






9, 210. 


91 


Bonds Authorized 


198, 000. 


00 








Accounts Receivable 






89. 


1 1 


Less: Notes Retired 


37, 000. 


00 


161, 


000. 


00 


Prepaid Insurance 






1,114. 


07 


Debt Service Reserve 






6, 


111. 


00 


Development Cost 


198, 000. 


00 






Operating Reserve 






7, 


258. 


00 


Liquidated 


37, 000. 


00 


161, 000. 


00 








175, 


300. 


52 












Operating Surplus 






1 , 


734. 


89 


Total 






177, 035. 


41 


Total 






177, 


035. 


41 



Council for the Aged 



On June 15, 1962 a progressive step in community activity was made by the establishment of a Council for 
the Aged. Several months were spent by the council investigating the purposes of other councils, their most 
significant accomplishments, and how such activities could apply to our community. The following purposes 
have been adopted by the Wilmington Council for the Aged. 

1. Establish channels of communication with State and Federal agencies dealing 
with the interests and needs of older people. 

2. Establish an information center for the community on the subject of elderly 
citizens and their place in the community. 

3. Investigate the facilities and services presently available to Wilmington's 
senior citizens and make recommendations for future expansion. 

4. Encourage increased co-operation among the various civic agencies providing 
services for the elderly. 

5. Encourage and support the activities of local Senior Citizens' Groups. 

6. Help foster positive community attitudes toward the elderly. 

7. Uncover areas of need among the elderly citizens and initiate remedial action. 

8. Assist in providing continuing opportunities for the elderly to remain active, 
alert, and useful members of the community. 

Time and patience were rewarded recently by the birth of the Wilmington Golden Age Club; a group restricted 
to members over sixty years of age who wish more fruitful and enjoyable years of retirement. 

With the experience of such successful councils as those in Brookline, Weymouth, and Lowell to guide us, 
:we are looking forward to an active and successful year. 



85 



Board of Public Welfare 



The Wilmington Board of Public Welfare respectfully submits its Annual Report for the year 1962. The 
Board consists of Mr. Maurice O'Neil, Chairman of the Board, Miss Florence Balkus and Mrs. Anna Low 
as members of the Board. 



,<Ci 



The three employees of the Board are Walter F. Coleman, the Director of Public Assistance, who also 
serves as secretary to the Board, Mrs. Miriam Sullivan is the Senior Clerk and Stenographer, and 
Miss Helen Hobson is the Social Worker. 

The categories of assistance which come under the supervision of the Board of Public Welfare are as follows 
General Relief, Aid to Dependent Children, Disability Assistance, Old Age Assistance, and Medical Assist- 
ance for the Aged. The last four categories are part of the Social Security Act and entitle each community 
to Federal and State reimbursements for the greater part of the aid rendered under these four programs. 

The Federal and State governments, however, insist that local Boards comply with the laws, rules, and 
policies set by them governing the disbursement of aid. Failure on the local level to comply could result in 
disallowances from these sources. The preservation of human dignity, the maintenance of family units and 
social rehabilitation constitute the underlying philosophy of modern public assistance. The major objective 
of all Public Welfare Agencies in working with public assistance families is the improvement of social 
services to strengthen family life, the safeguarding of children in hazardous home situations, and the re- 
duction of dependency by an effective program of rehabilitation, and in some cases habilitation services. 
This Board has also provided the following services to its clients when the need is urgent: Child counseling, 
home management, personal and family problems, arranging foster home care, counseling of separated 
parents in an effort to effect reconciliations. This Board also aids able-bodied fathers in job finding; and 
at the close of the year 1962, the Board was not aiding any family with an able-bodied father in the home 



A great many of the larger cities are greatly concerned with "relief cheaters" and are putting a greater 
effort to get them off the relief rolls. Cheating should never be condoned on the welfare rolls. It is in 
herently wrong, plus the fact that it penalizes the honestly needy. The smaller communities do not have 
this great problem, and if it is existent is a very small percentage of the total. The Wilmington Board did 
not have to penalize a family or an individual for "cheating or chiseling" in the year 1962. 

The Federal government, under the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, also requires Social 
Workers and the Supervisory Staff attend a series of training meetings each year for the purpose of inter- 
preting new laws, rules, and policies affecting Welfare Boards and to perform their duties more effectively. 
Attendance at these meetings is mandatory if local Boards wish to participate in the Federal grants-in-aid 
for administration of the various programs. 

It should be pointed out at this time that the rehabilitation of two Aid to Dependent Children families by a 
competent social worker would result in the savings of her salary alone, plus the benefits these families 
would derive from being self-supporting. 

The Board of Public Welfare lived within its appropriation and again returned some of its appropriation to 
the Town's Excess and Deficiency account. Please refer to the Town Accountant's report for the exact 
amount returned. The Board also had a large surplus in its Federal accounts, and this was used to reduce 
its requested appropriation for 1963 by approximately $20, 000 over the 1962 appropriation. The Board this 
past year also recovered a larger sum from estranged fathers of children who are on our Aid to Dependent 
Children program. This was due to our continued diligence in searching out these fathers and bringing 
them before the courts. 



I 



86 



A more detailed explanation of each category under its proper heading will follow on these pages. The 
Board still believes that the taxpayers of Wilmington are entitled to a full explanation of each program under 
its jurisdiction. It is also believed that this type of publicity is good for the Board of Public Welfare. A 
knowledge by the public of the Board's functions in detail should lessen to some degree their criticism of 
this department. The changes in the Welfare Laws, if any, will also be incorporated in the explanations of 
the various categories. 

OLD AGE ASSISTANCE 

This category is a federally-sponsored, State plan, administered by law through the local Boards of Public 
Welfare. The law requires local Boards to aid aged persons sixty-five and over, who are in need, and who 
have resided in Massachusetts for one year prior to application. Need is determined by applying budgetary 
standards set up by the State Department of Public Welfare. Some other requirements are personal property, 
such as cash, savings, bonds, etc. , not to exceed $500. 00. Liens are placed on property if the applicant 
has an interest in such property. 

The Federal government reimburses local boards $54. 00 a month for each case aided. The State pays two- 
thirds of the balance, and the remainder is paid by the local community and charged to the town or city of 
settlement. Five year s'continuous residence in a community without public aid constitutes a settlement. In 
the event a person does not have five consecutive years' residence in a town without aid, the State is billed 
for the balance. The Board, in its budget request, does not include the Federal share, as this amount by 
law is set up in a separate account and can be used only by the Board of Public Welfare for the Old Age 
Assistance category. The Board, in its budget request, must raise the State and other cities and towns 
share, as this amount is returned directly to the Excess and Deficiency Fund of the town and is used by the 
town. The assessors, however, anticipate this reimbursement based on the reimbursements of prior 
years, and it does not adversely affect the tax rate. 

For the past year, the law which most affected Old Age Assistance was Chapter 411 of the Acts of 1962, 
which amended Section 1 of Chapter 118A of the General Laws by providing as a basis of eligibility that a 
person must have resided continuously in the Commonwealth for one year immediately preceding the date of 
application. This modified the old law, whereby a person must have resided in Massachusetts for three A 
years out of the last nine, with the year immediately preceding date of application continuous. 

; 1 

During the year 1962 a total of seventy-eight Old Age Assistance cases were aided under this program at a 
cost of $66, 526. 50. 

AID TO DEPENDENT CHILDREN 

Aid to Dependent Children is another federally- sponsored category administered by law through the local 
Boards of Public Welfare to aid children that are deprived of parental support through desertion, mutual or 
legal separation, divorce, incarceration, death, disability, or unemployment of the parent. 

The Federal reimbursement on this program is $20. 50 per person, State reimbursement is one-third of the 
total expenditure. The local community pays the balance for the aid rendered. The Board does not include 
the Federal share in its budget request. The town must raise the State share and the local share, because 
the State's share is returned to the town's Excess and Deficiency Fund. There is no settlement required on 
this program. However, the children must have resided in the Commonwealth for one year prior to appli- 
cation. 

During 1962, members of this department appeared in various courts a total of twenty-eight times and were 
95% successful in these appearances against delinquent fathers by receiving court orders for support of 
their wive s and children. R eceipt s from thi s source amounted to $6,841.21 for 1962 , an increase of 83. 6% 
over 1961. 



87 



AID TO DEPENDENT CHILDREN 



During 1962, thirty-nine families were aided under this category in Wilmington with an expenditure of 
$37, 382. 83. 

The only major change for this category during the past year was more emphasis from the Federal and 
State levels on services by local Boards to the families receiving this type of aid. 

DISABILITY ASSISTANCE 

Disability Assistance is another federally- sponsored State plan administered by law by the local Boards of 
Public Welfare. It requires the local Boards to aid persons who have been declared permanently and totally 
disabled by the Medical Review Team of the State Department of Public Welfare and who are in need. Need 
is determined by budgetary standards set by the State Department of Public Welfare. The Federal reim- 
bursement for money expended in this category is $46. 50 a month per case, and the town's share is 25% of 
the total cost each month. The balance is reimbursed by the State Department of Public Welfare. The 
same manner of financing is used as in Old Age Assistance and Aid to Dependent Children. There were no 
major changes on this program during 1962 from the Federal or State levels. 

During the year 1962, eleven cases were aided on this category. Total expenditure for 1962 on this pro- 
gram was $13, 629. 10. 

MEDICAL ASSISTANCE FOR THE AGED 

Medical Assistance for the Aged is also a federally- sponsored State plan administered by law by the local 
Boards of Public Welfare. This program was born in I960 when changes made under the Social Security Act 
established this category under the Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare. The bill, as passed at 
that level, recognized a need for medical care for aged persons. It, as in other Federal and State pro- 
grams, requires local Boards to aid persons over 65, who are medically indigent and reside in the Common 
wealth. No settlement is required under this category. 

Under Chapter 781 of the Acts of I960 the other requirements briefly are as follows: Aged persons 65 or 
over, who reside in the Commonwealth, are entitled to medical assistance, provided they do not have an 
income, if single, of more than $150. 00 a month, or if married, $225. 00 a month; and providing further 
that, if single, they do not have bank deposits, securities, cash on hand and/or similar assets amounting to 
more than $2, 000, or if married, more than $3, 000. Persons eligible for this form of assistance shall be 
entitled to part or all of the cost of (1) in-patient hospital ward care; (2) public medical institution services; 
(3) nursing home care; (4) physician's services; (5) out-patient or clinical services; (6) nursing services; 
(7) physical therapy and related services; (8) dental services; (9) home health care services; (10) laboratory 
and x-ray services; (11) prescribed drugs, eye glasses, dentures and other prosthetic devices; (12) diag- 
nostic screening and preventive services; (13) any other care or remedial care recognized under the law of 
the Commonwealth; and (14) other medical care in accordance with the Department of Public Welfare Medica 
Care Plan. 

Reimbursement for care under this program is fifty per cent of all monies expended by the Federal govern- 
ment, two-thirds of the balance by the State, the remaining one-third balance to be assumed by the local 
community. This department aided sixty-four cases during the year 1962 for a total expenditure of 
$52, 1 19. 44. 

GENERAL RELIEF 

This program requires local Boards to meet the community's statutory obligation to relieve a person in 
need. The decisions on who shall be aided and the amount given is left entirely to the local Board's 



88 



GENERAL RELIEF 



discretion. Unlike the Federal programs where the final decision rests with the State through an appeal 
process, the local Board makes the final decision. The local Boards, through their policies and decisions, 
invariably attempt to reflect community thinking. The financing of this program is a direct cost to the 
Town. The only monies returned to the community for this type of relief are for cases whose settlements 
are in another community, or for those persons who have no legal settlement. On these cases, the total 
amount is either paid for by other cities and towns or by the State. The local Board of course is also liable 
for payments to other cities and towns on general relief when the person aided in another city or town has a 
Wilmington settlement. By legal settlement, it is meant that a person has resided in a community for five 
consecutive years without aid. 

During the year 1962 there were twenty-eight cases aided under this category in Wilmington with a total 
expenditure of $6, 814. 68. 

ADMINISTRATION 

Administration costs cover all expenditures by the Board to administer the five programs under its juris- 
diction; namely, Old Age Assistance, Medical Assistance for the Aged, Disability Assistance, Aid to De- 
pendent Children and General Relief. Reimbursement under the four programs is as follows: Under Old 
Age Assistance, Medical Assistance for the Aged, and Disability Assistance, the Federal reimbursement 
is 55% of total expenditures for salaries, employee benefits, and travel. The State's share for these items 
is 22. 5% of total expended on Old Age Assistance and Medical Assistance for the Aged; Aid to Dependent 
Children 12. 5% of total, and Disability Assistance 20% of total. All other administration expenditures under 
j all categories, except General Relief, is Federal 50% of total, State 25% of total. Federal funds, as in the 
other programs, are restricted by law for the sole use of administration. The State's share is returned to 
the Excess and Deficiency Fund and is used by the Town for any purpose. Administration costs for General 
Relief are not reimbursable by the Federal or State governments. 

GENERAL COMMENTS 

The Board wishes to again note that economic conditions are the basic rules governing the amount of monies 
expended under its various programs, and the total cost to the Town is relatively small compared to the 
total amount expended plus the benefits derived by the persons aided. 

The Board again this year wishes to thank the local Police Department for its help and co-operation during 
the past year. We also wish to thank the Fire Department for its ambulance service during the year to our 
medically indigent. 

Also, we wish to publicly thank the following organizations for their generosity to the needy in the year 1962: 
Community Fund, Salvation Army, Jaycee -ette s , Wilmington Lions Club, The Quality Control Department 
1 of AVCO, Jaycees, Mystic Transformers, and the Brownies. 

The Board closes its annual report with one of its principles. Public Assistance as we know it is a more 
successful, more satisfactory means of meeting the needs of the poor than the almshouse, the beggar's 
i bowl, or the medieval monastery. 

This report was prepared for the local Board of Public Welfare by its Director of Public Assistance, 
1 Walter F. Coleman. 



89 



Board of Health 



Per sonnel: 

Ernest F. Romano, M. S Town Sanitarian 

Anne Butters, R. N Public Health Nurse 

Gerald Fagan, M. D Public Health Physician 

Leo LeBlanc Animal and Slaughtering Inspector 

Simon Cutter Legal Consultant 

Gardiner Lester, D. V. M Veterinarian 



In February 1962 Ernest F. Romano was appointed Town Sanitarian to replace Patrick Thibeau who resigned 
in December 1961. Mr. Leo LeBlanc assumed the duties of Acting Health Agent during the interim period, 
and special health functions were assigned to Robert Meserve and John LaPlante. 

It is the aim of the Board of Health to revaluate its various functions from time to time in order that empha- 
sis may be placed on those of greater need. During 1962 a tremendous stride was taken with the adminis- 
tration of the new oral polio vaccine to sideline polio as a major public health problem. In December a 
monthly Immunization Clinic for preschool children was started. It is designed to provide protection againsl 
many of the childhood diseases. 

Some health programs were also discontinued during the year. Fluoridation of water, a highly beneficial 
health program, was scrapped by the townspeople. 

The Board of Health underwent some changes. Mrs. Marion Boylen was named Chairman of the Board. 
Mr. Erving Pfau, a capable and conscientious member, resigned because of change of residence. 
Mr. Edward T. Driscoll was appointed to replace him. 

A. Communicable Disease Control: 

1. Immunization Clinics: 

In December 1962 a monthly Immunization Clinic for preschool children was started for pro- 
tection against whooping cough, diphtheria, tetanus, and polio. Thirty-six children attended 
the first clinic. These monthly clincs will now enable children to receive protection at proper 
age levels and will also provide health authorities with more accurate records. These 
records can be used to advise parents on the immunization status of their children. 

Clinics will be held on the first Tuesday of each month. Any of the required first, second, 
third, or booster doses will be given at any clinic. 

A vaccination clinic for protection against smallpox will be established sometime in the Spring. 
This new program will be held on a yearly basis. It is recommended that a child be vaccinated 
between the age of seven and twelve months. Four Immunization Clincs were held: 

1962 1961 



Booster doses given 90 105 

Children completing series of three doses 35 32 



90 



II. 



Polio Immunization Clinic: 



During 1962 it was announced that a new oral polio vaccine was developed which would confer per- 
manent immunity. Free vaccine was made available by the State Health Department for first 
graders and preschool children. The Town purchased enough vaccine for the entire school popula- 
tion. The program, thanks to the support of many of the townspeople, including the clergy, was an 
overwhelming success. The vaccine was made available also to school personnel and all Town 
employees. Ten Polio Clinics were held: 



Type I given 
Type III given 



5, 656 
5, 465 



It is anticipated that Type II will be given in March 1963. This will complete the series for those 
who received Type I and Type III in 1962. 

III. Anti-Rabies Clinic: 

This year the Dog Immunization Clinic was held in May at the fire station. Five hundred and forty- 
eight dogs were immunized as compared with four hundred and ninety for the previous year. A total 
of $438. 90 was collected as inoculation fees. 

IV. Asian Flu Vaccine: 

The State Health Department and other health agencies predicted that Asian Flu would reach epidemic 
proportions during the 1962-1963 winter period. A supply of the vaccine was procured, in spite of 
the shortage, and made available to Town employees with Civil Defense funds. Seventy-four persons 
were immunized. 

B. Public Health Nursing Visits: 



This phase of the Public Health Nurse's program includes all services associated with care of the sick. It 
means either giving or arranging for necessary nursing care, teaching through demonstration, and super- 
vising of care given by household members. It is offered only under the direction and guidance of a physi- 
cian and is available to any person living within the Town of Wilmington. 

I. Health Visits: 

A total of one hundred and seven visits were made in the interest of infant, preschool, and adult 
health. Family well-being is the goal of all public health nursing. In many instances, it is not 
possible always for the family to fulfill all of its functions alone. The ultimate aim of this service 
is to insure a healthier community by informing and acquainting individuals and families with services 
and facilities whereby they might formulate plans for the promotion and protection of their own health, 
welfare, and well-being. 

II. Day Care Centers: 

During 1962 the State Health Department announces that major legislative changes would be enacted 
for day nurseries. This would include designating the State Department of Public Health as the 
licensing authority for these centers, or permitting the State to designate local Boards of Health to 
license them provided certain criteria be met. Laws would be made also relating to the erection, 
alteration, and inspection of buildings by the Department of Public Safety. Four inspections of 
Day Care Centers were made. 



Nursing visits for 1962 . . 
Fees collected for visits 



786 
$220 



91 



III. Tuberculosis Report for 1962: 



Total number of active cases on register 12/31/62 13 

Total number of active cases hospitalized 12/31/62 2 

Number of new cases reported in 1962 3 

Number of new cases moved in 1962 1 

Number of cases put on inactive list 1 

Number of diagnosed cases visited 17 

Total number of visits made to diagnosed cases 132 

Total number of visits to Middlesex County Sanatorium 15 

Total number of visits (contacts, cases, suspects) 217 



A tuberculin testing program was carried on again in the school system. This is a case-finding 
program for tuberculosis. The public health nurse assisted the school nurses in this program and 
assumed responsibility for the examination of reactors to the test and contacts of reactors. 

IV. Premature Birth: 

Twenty-one premature births were reported during 1962. Assistance for hospitalization expenses 
was granted by the Board of Health in four cases. 



C. Environmental Sanitation: 

The local Board of Health is the established agency to protect and promote the public health. Prevention of 
disease is one of its goals. In this endeavor environmental health plays an important role since many com- 
municable diseases may be transmitted through food, milk, water, and sewage. 

> I. Water Supply: 

w 

,.0 Water has often been involved in disease transmission. This is more often the case in communities 

. with private wells and sewage disposal systems. It is estimated that ten per cent of Wilmington 

dwellings have private wells as a source of water supply. Efforts should be made when possible to 
connect to the municipal water system. Wells should be tested twice a year. The Board of Health 
laboratory is available for this purpose. 



Private Wells: 

Water Samples analyzed 127 

Chemical Analysis 24 

Municipal Water System: 

In March the daily fluoride tests were discontinued when the Town voted to discontinue 
fluoridation. Forty-five fluoride tests had been made. 



II. Milk Sanitation: 

Licenses Dairies 19 

Milk and Cream analysis 28 

III. Food Sanitation: 

In March the State Health Department was requested to conduct an impartial survey of the local 
food establishments. The results showed that the community rating was 59. 88% out of a possible 
100%. Only three establishments received ratings of more than 80%, and one received a rating of 
24%. As a result of the survey, two facilities were issued temporary food permits until such time 
as improvement of their ratings was made. A total of seventy-two inspections were made. 

92 



IV. 



Sewage Disposal Sanitation: 



In 1962 it became necessary by law to submit proposed plans for the installation of sewage disposal 
systems. This procedure insures not only better control, but also provides plans for record pur- 
poses for future reference by home owners. Two subdivision plans for a total of two hundred and 
eight houses were submitted to the Board of Health for approval. One plan involving twenty-eight 
houses was approved, and the other with one hundred and eighty houses was disapproved. 



1962 1961 

Total Sewerage Permits Issued: 154 143 

New Dwellings 118 108 

Old Dwellings 28 27 

Commercial 3 3 

Industrial 5 3 

Schools 2 



Fees totaled $751. 00 

V. Refuse Disposal: 

The dump contract which expired January 1963 was extended to April 1, 1963. Bids were received 
for a new contract to extend to 1966. Two bids were submitted and both were rejected as being un- 
acceptable to the Board of Health. 

No changes were made in the garbage contract during the year. Collection service was extended 
to approximately one hundred new residents. 

VI. Recreational Area Sanitation: 

Periodic inspections and surveys are made of public and private areas throughout the year in order 
to safeguard the participants at these facilities. Examinations are made of water supplies, sewage 
disposal, and bathing areas. One water well was abandoned as a result of analysis. The follow- 
ing analyses were made: 

Water Supply 6 
Water Samples - swimming 25 

VII. Housing Sanitation: 

Difficult housing cases carried over from the previous year 
became necessary to bring court action against one of these 
burned and another torn down. Several houses were posted 

VIII. Miscellaneous Inspections: 



Carnivals 


2 


Nuisances 


75 


Piggeries 


14 


Recreation Camps 


4 


Rodent Control 


7 


Stables 


24 


Town Dump 


12 



received particular attention. It 

Following notice, one structure was 
as being unfit for human habitation. 



93 




D. Permits and Licenses: 



The following licenses and permits were issued. Fees totaled - $1,245.97. 



1962 1961 



Oleomargarine licenses 


1 1 


10 


Methyl Alcohol licenses 


5 





Stable licenses 


24 


2 


Sewerage permits 


155 


143 


Refuse transportation 


35 


31 


Camps 


2 


2 


Milk Dairy licenses 


19 


18 


Milk Store licenses 


25 


30 


Wholesale Manufacture of Ice Cream 


1 


1 


Retail Manufacture of Ice Cream 


1 


1 


Funeral Directing 


3 


3 


Kindergarten 


2 


2 


Piggerie s 


10 


1 1 


Food Permits 


30 


41 



E. 



Laboratory: 



Some new equipment was added to the laboratory which will enable additional testing of water. 
Water and milk samples were collected and analyzed throughout the year. Notices were sent to 
dairies informing them of the test results. Recommendations were made to home owners when 
well water showed evidence of contamination. The following analyses were made: 



.9 
'J 

!§ 



Water samples 
Fluoride test 
Swimming water 
Milk and Cream analysis 



127 

45 (discontinued 3/62) 

25 

28 



The Board of Health again this year wishes to thank those ladies who contributed their time assisting at ou 
Polio Immunization Clinics and to the newspapers, clergy, and school department who helped make these 

clinics a success. 



I- 



94 



Town Meetings 



WARRANT FOR THE ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MARCH 3, 1962 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 



TO: A. John Imbimbo, Constable of the Town of Wilmington: 

GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and in the manner prescribed in the By- 
laws of said Town, you are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of the Town qualified to vote 
in Town affairs to meet and assemble at the High School Cafeteria, Saturday, the 3rd day of March, A. D. 
1962 at 9. 45 o'clock in the forenoon, the polls to be opened at 10. 00 a. m. and shall be closed at 8. 00 p. m. 
for the election of Town Officers: 

ARTICLE 1: Two Selectmen for the term of three years; Two members of the School Committee for the 
term of three years; One Moderator for the term of one year; One member of the Wilmington Housing 
Authority for the term of five years, and vote on the following Question: 

QUESTION No. 1. "Shall the fluoridation of the water supply of the Town of Wilmington be continued?" 

If a majority of the votes in answer to said question is in the affirmative, the fluoridation of the water supply 

of said town shall be continued; otherwise it shall be discontinued. YES NO > 

1 

You are also hereby further required and directed to notify and warn the said inhabitants of the Town of 
Wilmington who are qualified to vote on elections and town affairs therein to assemble subsequently and 
meet in Town Meeting at the High School Gymnasium, Church Street, in said Town of Wilmington on Satur- 
day, the 10th Day of March, A. D. 1962 at 1. 30 p. m. , then and there to act on the remainder of the articles 
in said Warrant. 

In accordance with the above, the meeting was called to order by the Clerk, Mr. Simon Cutter at 9. 45 a.m. 
as much of the Warrant as is noted above was read, and on a motion by Mr. Joseph P. Ring it was voted to 
dispense with further reading of said Warrant. 

The ballot boxes were examined by the Warden, Clerk and the Police Officer on duty. Both boxes were 
found to be empty and the register on each indicated 00000. Each ballot box was then locked and the keys 
given to the Police Officer. 

The election officers were sworn to the faithful performance of their duties. 

The ballots were delivered to the Ballot Clerks; one box of ballots containing fifty-seven hundred (5700) 
ballots. 

The Polls were declared open at 10. 00 a. m. The Polls were declared closed at 8. 00 p. m. 
There were Two Thousand Three Hundred Ninety-four (2394) ballots cast . 

All of the ballots case were sorted, counted, recorded and declaration thereof made, as by law is directed, 
and were for the following, namely: 



95 



Selectman - Three Years 

Elected John Brooks, One Thousand Six Hundred Twelve 

Elected Wavie M. Drew, One Thousand Two Hundred Thirty-eight 

Charles P. Greene, Four Hundred Seventy- six 
Rene J. LaRivee, One Thousand One Hundred Thirty-three 
Blanks, Three Hundred Twenty-nine 



Voted 
1612 
1238 

47 6 
1 133 

329 
4788 



School Committee - Three Years 

Elected Glen E. Connolly, One Thousand Seventy-three 

Elected Edward F. Page, Nine Hundred Fifty 

Robert F. Hastings, Eight Hundred Fifteen 
Arthur J. Brewster, Six Hundred Forty-three 
M. Flora Kasabuski, Five Hundred Fifty-eight 
George G. Lingenfelter , Jr. , One Hundred Ninety-five 
Joseph A. Paglia, One Hundred Forty-eight 
Blanks, Four Hundred Six 



1073 
950 
815 
643 
558 
195 
148 
406 

4788 



Moderator - One Year 

Elected Simon Cutter, Two Thousand Forty 

Blanks, Three Hundred Fifty-three 
Others, One 



2040 
353 

1 

2394 



> 

[ J 

(3 



Wilmington Housing Authority - Five Years 

Elected James P. Donahue, One Thousand Nine Hundred Thirteen 

Blanks, Four Hundred Eighty 
Others, One 



1913 
480 
1 



2394 



QUESTION NO. 1: "Shall the fluoridation of the water supply of the Town of Wilmington be continued 9 
If a majority of the votes in answer to said question is in the affirmative, the fluoridation of the water 
supply of said town shall be continued; otherwise it shall be discontinued. 



VOTED TO DISCONTINUE FLUORIDATION OF THE WATER SUPPLY 



YES - 
NO - 

BLANKS - 



701 
1622 
71 
2394 



A - K ballot box register read 
L - Z ballot box register read 



1281 
1 113 
2394 



There were two spoiled ballots. 



All elected officials were present, and they were immediately sworn to the faithful performance of their 
duties by the Town Clerk. 



Attest: 



(Mrs. ) Esther L. Russell 
Town Clerk 



96 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MARCH 10, 1962 
HIGH SCHOOL GYMNASIUM 



The Adjourned Annual Town Meeting was called to order by the Moderator, Mr. Simon Cutter, at 1. 45 p.m. 
Reverend Terry Clay Thomason led the meeting in prayer. 

Mr. Cutter said that he would refer to each article by number only, if there were no objections. There 
being none, this procedure was followed. 

ARTICLE 2: To hear the reports of Committees and act thereon. 
Mr. Paul Niles read a report for the Permanent Building Committee. 
Mr. Fred Corum read a report for the High School Building Committee. 

ARTICLE 3: To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Select- 
men, to borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the financial year, beginning 
January 1, 1963 and to issue notes therefor payable within one year, all in accordance with Sections 4 and 
17, Chapter 44 of the General Laws. On a motion by Mr. Charles H. Black the above article was voted 
unanimously. 

ARTICLE 4: To see how much money the Town will appropriate for the expenses of the Town and Salaries 
of the several Town Offices, and Departments, and determine how the same shall be raised, whether by 
taxation, transfer from available funds, or otherwise, or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. Robert B. Michelson: "I move that the several and respective sums as recommended by the 
Finance Committee be raised by taxation and appropriated for the purposes set forth in Article #4, each 
item to be taken up and voted on separately, subject to amendment". VOTED, unanimously. 



Accordingly the following amounts were voted: 



General Government: 


T axation 


Board of Selectmen 


2, 875. 00 


Election Expenses 


1, 400. 00 


Registrars of Voters 


3, 000. 00 


Finance Committee 


700. 00 


Town Manager 


17, 360. 00 


Industrial Expenses 


1, 200. 00 


Town Accountant 


7, 800. 00 


Town Treasurer 


6, 400. 00 


Town Collector 


11, 798. 00 


Town Clerk 


5, 700. 00 


Board of Assessors 


13, 890. 00 


Town Counsel 


3, 500. 00 


Town Hall 


16, 000. 00 


Planning Board 


2, 425. 00 


TOTAL - General Government 


94, 048. 00 


Protection: Persons and Property 




Police Department Salaries 


123, 710. 00 


Police Department Expenses 


9, 575. 00 


Police Station 


4, 250. 00 


Fire Department Salaries 


106, 382. 00 


Fire Department Expenses 


6,901. 00 


Fire Department Outlays 


3, 500. 00 


Fire Station 


4, 525. 00 


Ambulance Expenses 


2, 050. 00 



97 



Protection: Persons and Property 

Civil Defense 

Constable 

Dog Officer 

Building Inspector 

Board of Appeals 

Sealer Weights/Measures 

Tree Warden Department 

Dutch Elm Control 

Gypsy Moth Control 

TOTAL: Protection - Persons and Property 

Public Works: 

Town Engineer 

Highway Department Salaries 

Highway Department Expenses 

Road Machinery Account 

Chapter 90 Construction 

Chapter 90 Maintenance 

Chapter 81 Maintenance 

Snow and Ice Control 

Public Street Lights 

Parks (Planning Board) 

Cemeterie s 

TOTAL: Public Works 

Health and Sanitation: 

Board of Health 
> Garbage Collection 

(0, Public Dump 

TOTAL: Health and Sanitation 

J 

- Charities and Veterans Aid: 



Z Administration, Public Welfare 

Assistance, Public Welfare 

TOTAL: Charities 

Veterans Aid and Benefits 

Schools: 

School Department Salaries 

School Department Expenses (Amended to read) 

(Sub-total: Schools) 
Operation School Plant 
Vocational Training 



Library and Recreation: 
Public Library 
Recreation Commission 
TOTAL: Library and Recreation 

Unclassified and Reserve: 
Reserve Fund 
Insurance 

Training, Travel, etc. 



T axation 
3, 000. 00 
100. 00 
1, 600. 00 
9, 535. 00 
400. 00 
695. 00 
11, 110. 00 
9, 755. 88 
7, 269. 92 
304, 358. 80 



13, 315. 00 
57, 504. 00 
29, 060. 00 
16, 000. 00 
7, 500. 00 
1, 500. 00 
11, 000. 00 
28, 240. 00 
16, 500. 00 
3, 220. 00 
32, 974. 80 
216, 813. 80 



20, 571. 00 
9, 000. 00 
15, 500. 00 
45, 071. 00 



8, 563. 00 
97, 650. 00 
106, 213. 00 

28, 765. 00 



922, 197. 19 
140, 332. 56 

1, 062, 529. 75 
182, 195. 40 
6, 000. 00 

1, 250, 725. 15 



17, 809. 00 
7, 495. 00 
25, 304. 00 



20, 000. 00 
26, 506. 73 
1, 500. 00 



98 



Unclassified and Reserve: (continued) 
Town Report 

Tax Title & Legal Assistance 
Town Clock 

TOTAL: Unclassified & Reserve 



T axation 
2, 500. 00 
500. 00 
100. 00 
51, 106. 73 



Maturing Debt and Interest: 

Principal 

Interest and Fees 



(Voted to take this total as one item) 



351, 400. 00 
130, 866. 53 
482, 266. 53 



Motion by Mr. Robert B. Michelson to amend the Maturing Debt and Interest Total 
above, by transferring from available funds the sum of 
the balance to be raised by taxation 

TOTAL: Maturing Debt and Interest 

GRAND TOTAL: By Taxation 



Budget: By Taxation 
By Transfer 
Total Budget 



$2, 407, 058. 43 
197, 613. 58 
$2, 604, 672. 01 



197, 613. 58 
284, 652. 95 

482, 266. 53 

$2, 407, 058. 43 



ARTICLE 5: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of One Thousand Dollars 
$1,000. 00 for the observance of Memorial Day and that the Moderator appoint a Committee who shall ar- 
range and have charge of such observance, or do anything in relation thereto. Finance Committee 
approved $1,000.00. Upon a motion by Mr. DeFelice the above article was adopted - $1,000.00 to be 
raised and appropriated for the observance of Memorial Day. 

ARTICLE 6: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of Seven Hundred Fifty Dollars 
($750. 00) for the purpose of renewing under authority of Section 9 of Chapter 40 of the General Laws as 
amended, the lease of the American Legion Clubhouse, Inc. , in Wilmington for the purpose of providing 
suitable headquarters for the Wilmington Post No. 136 of the American Legion, or do anything in relation 
thereto. Finance Committee approved - $750. 00. Mr. John F. Winters moved the adoption of the above 
article. Voted by voice unanimously. 

ARTICLE 7: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of Seven Hundred Fifty Dollars 
($750. 00) for the purpose of renewing under authority of Section 9 of Chapter 40 of the General Laws as 
amended, the lease of the Veterans of Foreign Wars Clubhouse on Main Street for the purpose of providing 
suitable headquarters for the Nee -Ellsworth Post 2458 of the Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States, 
or do anything in relation thereto. Finance Committee approved - $750. 00. Mr. Paul A. Farrell moved 
the adoption of the above article. Voted by voice unanimously. 

ARTICLE 8: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money under the authority of 
Section 9 of Chapter 40 of the General Laws, as amended, for the purpose of providing suitable quarters 
for the William F. Tattersall Chapter No. 106, Disabled American Veterans, located in Wilmington, Mass. 
or do anything in relation thereto. Finance Committee approved - $750. 00. Mr. Clarence J. Mans 
moved the adoption of the above article. Voted by voice unanimously. 

ARTICLE 9: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of One Hundred Dollars ($100) 
the money to be expended under the direction of the 4-H Town Committee, serving in cooperation with the 
Middlesex County Extension Service, under the provisions of Sections 40 to 45, Chapter 128, General Laws 
of Massachusetts. Finance Committee approved - $100.00. Mr. Donald C. Kidder moved the adoption 
of the above article. Voted by voice unanimously. 



99 



ARTICLE 10: To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation, or transfer from available 
funds and appropriate for the purchase of two vehicles for the use of the Police Department, and authorize 
the sale or turn-in of the two present vehicles used by the Police Department, or do anything in relation 
thereto. Request of the Town Manager. Finance Committee approved - $2, 500. 00. Mrs. Wavie M. Dre\ 
moved the adoption of the above article - $2, 500. 00 to be raised by taxation and appropriated for the above 
purpose. Voted unanimously. 

ARTICLE 1 1: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of lay- 
ing water mains of not less than 6 inches, but less than 16 inches in diameter on specified 'streets in accorc 
ance with the recommendations of the Board of Water Commissioners acting under the provisions of 
Chapter 332, Acts of 1955, and determine how the appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation, by 
transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of 
the Board of Water Commissioners. Finance Committee approved - $46,000.00 - 15 year maximum bond. 

Motion by Mr. Waldo A. Stevens: "I move that the Town vote to raise by borrowing and appropriate the 
sum of $46, 000. 00 for the purpose of laying water mains of not less than six inches, but less than sixteen 
inches in diameter under the provisions of Chapter 332 of the Acts of 1955 for certain distances on the 
following streets: Marcia Road, Massachusetts Avenue, Shady Lane Drive, Cunningham Street, Hopkins 
Street and Dorchester Street, and to meet such appropriation that the Treasurer, with the approval of the 
Board of Selectmen, be and hereby is authorized to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor, payable in 
not more than 15 years. " 

Motion by Mr. Wilson Belbin to lay Article 1 1 on the table and take up Article 16 at this time was lost by a 
voice vote. 



A long discussion followed during which the Moderator relinquished the chair to Mr. Philip Buzzell in orde 
that he could speak in favor of the motion. Mr. Waldo Stevens spoke on the motion - he said that every 
abutter was agreeable to have the streets mentioned in the motion under the Betterment Act. The questior 
>■■ was called for. Mr. Buzzell read the motion again and told the meeting that since this was a Bond Issue 
(Oi the vote would be taken by standing. Yes 268 No 9 Motion carried. 

►2 

. ^ ARTICLE 12: To see if the Town will vote to accept Public Law 560, 83rd Congress, as amended, and tha' 

»;5 the Board of Water and Sewer Commissioners be authorized to enter into negotiations with the Administrat 

of the Housing and Home Finance Agency to apply for Federal Funds and that the Board of Water and Sewer 
Commissioners be authorized to expend the same for test well investigations, plans, and reports, with 
estimates of cost of improvements to the Town water supply, with the understanding that the Town will re- 
imburse the Federal Government for that part of the cost of the investigations allocated to a particular 
water supply project, if and when that particular water project is subsequently voted by the Town, said 
investigations to be made by an engineer approved by the administrator, and that the Town authorizes the 
Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen to borrow from the United States Government, under the 
terms of Public Law 560, as amended, for the purpose of making said investigations for the Town of Wil- 
mington, Massachusetts. Requested by the Board of Water and Sewer Commissioners. Finance Committ 
I ' approved - To authorize the Town to borrow a sum of money from the Federal Government not to exceed 

$45, 000. 00. 



Mr. Waldo A. Stevens moved the adoption of the above article and to effect same the Treasurer with the 
approval of the Selectmen be authorized to borrow an amount not to exceed $45, 000. 00 from the United 
States Government, under the terms of Public Law 560, as amended, for the purpose of making said inves 
tigations for the Town of Wilmington, Massachusetts. Voted unanimously. 

ARTICLE 13: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of lay- 
ing a water main of not less than 6 inches, but less than 16 inches in diameter on Butters Row in accordan 
with the recommendations of the Board of Water Commissioners acting under the provisions of Chapter 33 
Acts of 1955, and determine how the appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation, by transfer from 
available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of ' 
Water Commissioners. Finance Committee approved - $40,000.00 - 15 year bond. 



100 



ARTICLE 13 (continued): 

Motion by Mr. Waldo A. Stevens, "I move that the Town vote to raise by borrowing and appropriate the sum 
of $40, 000. 00 for the purpose of laying a water main of 12 inches in diameter in Butters Row from Chestnut 
Street to Main Street, under the provisions of Chapter 332 of the Acts of 1955, and to meet such appropria- 
tion that the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, be and hereby is authorized to issue 
bonds or notes of the Town therefor, payable in not more than 15 years. " 

A lengthy discussion followed during which a voter asked why the water could not be put down this street 
without betterments. The Town Counsel was asked for an opinion. Mr. Buzzell answered that the water 
would have to be put in under the Betterment Act, since Butters Row is an accepted street. The question 
was called - to close debate. By standing vote - Yes 257 No 2 

The vote on the main motion was taken by a standing vote Yes 153 No 104 2/3 needed - 

motion defeated. 

ARTICLE 14: To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, or transfer from available funds, and 
appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of paying unpaid bills of previous years, or do anything in 
relation thereto. Request of the Town Manager. Finance Committee approved - $1,209.44. Upon a 
motion by Mr. Charles H. Black the above article was voted unanimously, the sum of $ 1 , 209. 44 to be 
raised by taxation and appropriated for the purpose as stated above. 

ARTICLE 15: To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available funds a sum of 
money not to exceed Three Thousand Five Hundred Dollars ($3, 500. 00) and appropriate the sum for hot 
topping Avenues in Wildwood Cemetery as far as the money will permit, or take any action in relation there- 
to. Request of the Cemetery Commissioners. Finance Committee approved - $3,500.00. Motion by 
Mr. John Brooks that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $3, 500. 00 for hot top- 
ping avenues in Wildwood Cemetery as far as the money will permit. Voted - unanimously. 

ARTICLE 16: To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way the layout of Marcia Road as approved 
by the Planning Board and made by the Selectmen under the provisions of law relating to the assessment of 
Betterments which layout is filed in the office of the Town Clerk, and which, with plans therein mentioned 
is hereby referred to for more particular description; and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to take by 
the right of Eminent Domain such land, slope and drainage or other easements as may be necessary to 
effect the purpose of this article, and to determine how an appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxa- 
tion or by transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise, for the purpose of constructing said 
way and for the payment of any damages resulting from the taking of land and slope easements and other 
easements therefor, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. Finance 
Committee approved - $13, 000. 00 bond issue. 

Motion by Mr. Nicholas L. DeFelice that the Town vote to accept the above article and to appropriate the 
sum of $13, 000. 00 as follows: That the Town Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen is authorized 
to borrow the sum of $13, 000. 00 and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor payable within five years 
to effect the purpose of this article for which this money is raised. 

Mr. Edward J. Sullivan moved to amend the motion by laying it on the table. The Moderator relinquished 
the chair to Mr. Buzzell in order that he might speak on the motion. Mr. Buzzell called for a voice vote 
to amend the motion. Motion lost and so declared by the Moderator pro tern. Discussion followed on the 

main motion. The vote on the main motion was taken by a standing vote. Yes 201 No 28 

Motion carried. 

ARTICLE 17: To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way the layout of River Street as approved 
by the Planning Board and made by the Selectmen under the provisions of law relating to the assessment of 
Betterments, which layout is filed in the office of the Town Clerk, and which, with plans therein mentioned 
is hereby referred to for more particular description; and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to take by 
the right of Eminent Domain such land, slope and drainage or other easements as may be necessary to 
effect the purpose of this article, and to determine how an appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxa 
tion or by transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise, for the purpose of constructing said 



101 



L. 

(Ql 

u 

;3 



• > 



ARTICLE 17 (continued): 

way and for the payment of any damages resulting from the taking of land and slope easements and other 
easements therefor, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. Finance 
Committee approved - $8, 000. 00 - bond issue. 

Motion by Mr. Kidder that the Town vote to accept the article as above and to appropriate the sum of 
$8, 000. 00 as follows: That the Town Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen is authorized to borrow 
the sum of $8, 000. 00 and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor payable within five years as stated 
in the above Article, for which this money is raised. Voted unanimously. 

ARTICLE 18: To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way the layout of Pleasant Road as approved 
by the Planning Board and made by the Selectmen under the provisions of law relating to the assessment of 
Betterments, which layout is filed in the office of the Town Clerk, and which, with plans therein mentioned 
is hereby referred to for more particular description; and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to take by the 
right of Eminent Domain such land, slope and drainage or other easements as may be necessary to effect 
the purpose of this article, and to determine how an appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation or 
by transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise, for the purpose of constructing said way and 
for the payment of any damages resulting from the taking of land and slope easements and other easements 
therefor, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. Finance Committee 
approved - $11, 500. 00 bond issue. 

Motion by Mr. Kidder that the Town vote to accept the article as above and to appropriate the sum of 
$11, 500. 00 as follows: That the Town Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen is authorized to 
borrow the sum of $11, 500. 00 and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor payable within five years 

as stated in the above article, for which this money is raised. Voted by a standing vote - Yes 274 

No 10 Motion carried. 

ARTICLE 19: To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way the layout of Hamlin Lane as approved 
by the Planning Board and made by the Selectmen under the provisions of law relating to the assessment of 
Betterments, which layout is filed in the office of the Town Clerk, and which with plans therein mentioned 
is hereby referred to for more particular description; and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to take by 
the right of Eminent Domain such land, slope and drainage or other easements as may be necessary to 
effect the purpose of this article, and to determine how an appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxa- 
tion or by transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise, for the purpose of constructing said 
way and for the payment of any damages resulting from the taking of land and slope easements and other 
easements, therefor, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. Finance 
Committee approved - $7, 250. 00 - bond issue. 

Motion by Mr. Charles Black that the Town vote to accept the article as above and to appropriate the sum 
of $7,250. 00 as follows: That the Town Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen is authorized to 
borrow the sum of $7, 250. 00 and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor payable within five years as 
stated in the above Article, for which this money is raised. 

ARTICLE 20: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the reconstruction 
of a part of Salem Street and Ballardvale Street as shown on a plan on file with the Town Clerk, or take 
any action in relation thereon. Request of the Board of Selectmen. Finance Committee approved - 
$21, 000. 00 by taxation. 

Motion by Mr. DeFelice that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $21, 000. 00 to 
effect the above article. Voted by voice - unanimously. 

ARTICLE 21: To see how much money the Town will raise by taxation, or transfer from available funds, 
and appropriate for the purchase of an Accounting Machine for the use of the Town, or do anything in 
relation thereto. Request of the Town Manager. Finance Committee approved - $6, 500. 00. 



102 



ARTICLE 21 (continued): 

Motion by Mr. Donald C. Kidder that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $6, 500. 00 
for the purchase of an accounting machine for the use of the Town. Voted by voice unanimously. 

ARTICLE 22: To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available funds, the sum 
of Five Thousand Dollars ($5, 000. 00) and appropriate the sum for the purchase of a tractor, with attach- 
ments, for the use of the Cemetery Department or take any action in relation thereto. Request of 
Francis E. Downs. Finance Committee -- recommended. 

Motion by Mr. Francis E. Downs that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $5, 000. 
for the purchase of a tractor, with attachments, for the use of the Cemetery Department. Voted by voice 
unanimously. 

Motion by Mr. Edward Sullivan we recess from 5. 00 p. m. to 7. 00 p. m. at this point in the meeting. Vote 
taken by voice - LOST. 

ARTICLE 23: To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available 
funds and appropriate for the purchase of a front-end loader and backhoe for the use of the Highway Depart- 
ment, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen and Town Manager. Finance 
Committee approved - $13,000.00- 

Motion by Mrs. Drew that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of Thirteen Thousand 
Dollars ($13, 000. 00) for the purchase of a front-end loader and backhoe for the use of the Highway Depart- 
ment and further authorize the sale or turn-in of a present vehicle. Voted by voice unanimously. 

ARTICLE 24: To see if the Town will asume liability in the manner provided by Section 29 of Chapter 91 
of the General Laws, as amended by Chapters 516 and 524, Acts of 1950, for all damages that may be in- 
curred by work to be performed by the Department of Public Works of Massachusetts for the improvement, 
development, maintenance and protection of tidal and non-tidal rivers and streams, harbors, tidewaters, 
foreshores and shores along a public beach outside of Boston Harbor, including the Merrimack and Connec- 
ticut Rivers, in accordance with Section 1 1 of Chapter 9 1 of the General Laws, and authorize the Selectmen 
to execute and deliver a bond of indemnity therefor to the Commonwealth, or do anything in relation thereto. 
Request of the Board of Selectmen and Town Manager. Finance Committee approved. 

Motion by Mr. Brooks that the Town adopt the article as laid out above. Voted by voice unanimously. 

ARTICLE 25: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the improvement, 
development and maintenance of the Ipswich River (Chapter 91 Project) or take any action in relation thereto. 
Request of Board of Selectmen and Town Manager. Finance Committee approved $10, 000. 00. 

Motion by Mr. Black that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of Ten Thousand Dollars ($10, 000) 
for the improvement, development and maintenance of the Ipswich River (Chapter 91 Project). Voted 
unanimously. 

ARTICLE 26: To see if the Town will vote to place upon the Town Map, adopted at a Special Town Meeting 
February 11, 1961; Lowell Street from Sta. 7 + 50 to 14 + 50 as laid out by the County Commissioners in 
1908; according to a plan on file with the Town Engineer; and change name of this section of Lowell Street 
to Lowell Street Park; or do anything in relation thereto. Street numbers shall remain as at present. 
Request of Albert J. Kelly and others. Finance Committee approved. 

Motion by Mr. James R. Anderson that the Article as stated above be adopted. Voted by voice unanimously. 

ARTICLE 27: To see if the Town will vote to change the term of the office of Town Moderator from one 
year to three years, and if so voted, to take effect at the annual election of March 1963. Request of Simon 
Cutter. Finance Committee - disapproved. 



103 



ARTICLE 27 (continued): 

Motion by Mr. Black that the Town vote to change the term of the office of Town Moderator from one year 
to three years and to take effect at the annual election of March 1963. Motion lost and so declared by the 

Moderator . 



ARTICLE 28: To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-law and Map by changing from Single 
Residence A District to Industrial District, the following described parcel of land: A certain parcel of land 

bounded: 



Northerly by Lowell Street, one thousand one hundred eighteen and 96/100 (1118.96) feet; 
Easterly by the center of the Maple Meadow Brook; 

Southerly by land of Yentile, six hundred seventy-two and 23/100 (672.23) feet, more or less; 
Easterly still by land of Yentile, two hundred fifteen and 64/100 (215. 64) feet; 
Southerly still by land of Yentile one hundred sixty and 75/ 100 (160. 75) feet; and 

Westerly by land now or formerly of Samuel P. Pike, three hundred eighty-eight and 54/100 (388. 54) feet. 

All as shown on Plan No. 27556A, Sheet No. 1 filed with Certificate of Title No. 10603, or do anything in 
relation thereto. On petition of Alan Altman and others. Finance Committee approved Planning Board 
Recommendation. 



ffl, 
w 

* J 



52 



Motion by Mr. Alan Altman that the Town vote to amend the Zoning By-law and Map by changing from Single 
Residence A. District to Industrial District the above described parcel of land. Mr. Slater read a report 
from the Planning Board relative to Article 28. After some lengthy discussion Mr. Belbin moved that this 

article be laid on the table. Yes 11 No 194 LOST The main motion was voted by 

voice unanimously. 

ARTICLE 29: To see if the Town will vote to amend the Building By-law, Division 9 - Fire Protection, by 
adding a new section to read: "Section 13, Any part (as rooms, passages, closets) of any building which ex- 
tends within eight feet of any lot line shall be of first class construction. Any part of any building which ex- 
tends within twelve feet of any lot line shall be of first class or second class construction. The Board of 
Appeals shall grant no variances or special permit altering these provisions until ten (10) days after they 
have requested a report of the location from the Fire Chief, " or do anything in relation thereto. Request of 



the Building Inspector. Finance Committee approved. 



Motion by Mr. Minot J. Anderses hat the town vote to amend the Building By-law, Division 9 - Fire Pro- 
tection, by adding a new section to read; "Section 13. Any part (as rooms, passages, closets) of any build- 
ing which extends within eight feet of any lot line shall be of first class construction. Any part of any build- 
ing which extends within twelve feet of any lot line shall be of first class or second class construction. The 
Board of Appeals shall grant no variances or special permit altering these provisions until ten (10) days after 
they have requested a report of the location from the Fire Chief. " Voted by voice unanimously. 

ARTICLE 30: To see if the Town will vote to amend the Building By-law, Division 15 - Garages, by strik- 
ing out Section 3 and inserting in place thereof the following section: 'Section 3. No private garage shall be 
built to hold more than three (3) cars. Second class garages shall be placed not less than eight feet from 
property line. Garages placed less than eight feet from the property line shall be of first class construction. 
Garages of third class construction shall not be placed less than fifteen feet from the lot line and not less 
than fifteen feet from any building with combustible walls and/or outer covering. ' or do anything in relation 
thereto. Request of the Building Inspector. Finance Committee approved. 

Motion by Mr. Minot J. Anderson that the Town vote to amend the Building By-law, Division 15 - Garages, 
by striking out Section 3 and inserting in place thereof the following section: 'Section 3. No private garage 
shall be built to hold more than three (3) cars. Second class garages shall be placed not less than eight 
feet from property line. Garages placed less than eight feet from the property line shall be of first class 
construction. Garages of third class construction shall not be placed less than fifteen feet from the lot line 
and not less than fifteen feet from any building with combustible walls and/or outer covering. ' Voted by 
voice unanimously. 



104 



ARTICLE 31: To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-law and Map by changing from Neigh- 
borhood Business District to General Business District, the following described parcel of land; A certain 
parcel of land shown as Lot #123 on a plan known as "Wilmington Estates, North Wilmington, owned and 
developed by John D. Cooke, dated July, 1938, " Davis & Abbott, Civil Engineers, recorded with the Middle- 
sex North District Registry of Deeds, Book of Plans 61, Plan 76, and bounded and described as follows: 
Northerly by Middlesex Avenue, one hundred eighteen (118) feet; Easterly by Lot 122 as shown on said plan, 
one hundred fifty-five and 67/100 (155. 67) feet; Southerly by Lot 121 as shown on said plan; one hundred 
sixty-three (1 63) feet, more or less; and Westerly by Lubbers Brook, as shown on plan, or do anything in 
relation thereto. On petition of Barbara A. Moorman and others. Finance Committee approved. 

A motion was made by Mr. Cecil Lancaster, Town Manager, to pass over the article. Voted unanimously. 

ARTICLE 32: To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to enter into and fully perform on 
behalf of the Town an agreement with Robert G. & Bernice A. Cowie providing as follows: 

1. That Robert G. and Bernice A. Cowie will convey to the Town a parcel of land owned by them on 
Ballardvale Street described as follows: 

A parcel of land with the buildings thereon bounded easterly by Ballardvale Street - 75 ft. , southerly by land 
of the Town of Wilmington - 150 ft. , westerly by land now or formerly of Signore - 75 ft. , and northerly by 
said last mentioned land - 150 ft. Being the same premises conveyed to Robert G. and Bernice A. Cowie 
by Samuel S. Thorpe and wife by deed recorded with Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds, Book 1317, 
Page 395. 

2. That in consideration for such conveyance, the Town will pay in cash or partly in cash and partly in con- 
veyance to said Robert G. and Bernice A. Cowie a parcel of land on said Ballardvale Street owned by it and 
described as follows: 

Beginning at an iron pipe inside the stone wall at the northwest corner of lot near land of Frank J. Melanson, 
thence running along Ballardvale Street S 15° - 35', E, 12 5 . 00 feet ; thence S 67° 05 ' W , 1 8 1 . 50 feet by land 
of the Town of Wilmington; thence N 15° 35' W , 125. 00 feet by land of Frank J. Melanson to the point of 
beginning, containing 22, 500 square feet. Other details of such agreement to be at the discretion of the 
Selectmen. 

The object to such agreement being to provide further land for the location of the Intermediate School, 
construction of which was provided for at the Special Town Meeting held November 28, I960. Any funds 
necessary for its performance to be supplied from the funds previously appropriated for said school, or do 
anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. Finance Committee approved. 

Motion by Mr. Brooks: "I move the article be passed by for consideration by a Special Town Meeting." Voted 
unanimously. 

ARTICLE 33: To see if the Town will vote to raise a sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing or otherwise and appropriate the same for the purpose of completing the construction 
and equipping and furnishing the North Intermediate School, the Boutwell Street Elementary School and the 
Glen Road Elementary School, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Permanent Building 
Committee. Finance Committee - no report. 

Motion by Mr. Paul Niles to pass over the article until a Special Town Meeting. Voted unanimously. 

ARTICLE 34: To see if the Town will vote to raise a sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing or otherwise and appropriate the same for expenditure by the Permanent Building Com- 
mittee for the purpose of undertaking engineering surveys and subsurface explorations of parcels of land to 
be considered for acquisition for additional school sites in accordance with the provisions of Article 43 of 
the Annual Town Meeting of 1958, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Permanent Building 
Committee. Finance Committee approved $8,000.00. 



105 



ARTICLE 34 (continued): 

Motion by Mr. Paul H. Niles that the Town vote to raise and appropriate, by taxation, the sum of $8, 000. 00 
for expenditure by the Permanent Building Committee for the purpose of undertaking engineering surveys 
and subsurface explorations of parcels of land to be considered for additional school sites in accordance with 
the provisions of Article 43 of the Annual Town Meeting of 1958. 

At this point some one questioned whether or not a quorum was present. A standing count was taken - 
two hundred fifty-eight voters were present. The Moderator read the motion again. The vote was taken 
by voice and was unanimously in favor. 

ARTICLE 35: To see if the Town will vote to amend the building laws of the Town by adding thereto a new 
division which shall read: 



Division 20 - Gas Piping and Appliances Regulations: 



"Section 1 - The Massachusetts Code for Installation of Gas Appliances and Gas Piping established under 
Chapter 737, Acts of I960, is the gas piping code of the Town of Wilmington. 

"Section 2 - There shall be in the building department, under the supervision and direction of the Building 
Inspector, one or more inspectors of gas piping and gas appliances in buildings (to be known as 'gas 
inspectors' and one alternate gas inspector. ) They shall be appointed annually by the appointing authority, 
after consultation with the Building Inspector, and each shall be qualified by training and actual experience 
in gas piping. The Plumbing Inspector may also serve as Gas Inspector or as alternate. None shall inspect 
or pass on his own work. The principal duty of gas inspectors is the enforcement of the Mass. Code; and 
any other regulations established by the Board established under Chapter 25, Section 12H G. L. 

"Section 3 - Gas installers shall register before doing any gas piping or installing any gas appliances in 
Wilmington. Registration in any town or city within 15 miles will be accepted as meeting this requirement. 

>- 

"Section 4 - Permits are required for all piping or connecting of any gas appliances and must be applied for 
before commencing work. Applications 'dropped' at the Inspector's office during non-working hours will 
meet this requirement. Permits will be issued only to registered gas installers. Permits will be issued by 
the Building Inspector. 



<2 

"Section 5 - Fees will be set by the Building Inspector and the senior Gas Inspector, and after approval by 
the appointing authority, filing with the Town Clerk, and publishing, shall become effective. Fee includes 
only the first inspection; each inspection after the first shall be charged at not less than two dollars ($2. 00). 
Seventy per cent of the fee shall be paid to the Gas Inspector inspecting same. It is the declared intent that 
i the fees shall be set so that the Inspector will realize at least the journeyman rate for his time plus mileage 

at the going rate. 



I 



"Section 6 - Penalties - penalties as provided by Chapter 143 G. L. , Section 3N, are hereby adopted. " 

and further to see if the Town will raise and appropriate a sum not to exceed $750. 00 for the above purpose; 
or take any other action to carry out the provisions of Chapter 143, Section 30 G. L. Request of the 
Building Inspector. Finance Committee approved - not to exceed $750. 00. 

Mr. Minot J. Anderson moved the adoption of the above article and further moved that the sum of $750. 00 
be raised and appropriated for this purpose, in addition anything in our present laws involving gas installa 
tions be stricken out and substitute the motion as read. Voted unanimously. 

ARTICLE 36: To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-law and Map by changing from Single 
Residence A. District and Neighborhood Business District to General Business District thereby extending 
the existing General Business District the following described parcel of land: Beginning at a stone Mass. 
highway bound at the northwest corner of 1957 taking of Route 93 and Lowell Streets; thence northerly 
520. 06' on an arc along the western boundary of Route 93 to stake; thence South 82° 48' 44" West; 

106 



ARTICLE 36 (continued): 

581. 59' to a stake at end of a stone wall; thence South 55° 45' 00" West; 289. 15' along a stone wall to a drill 
hole at intersection of stone walls; thence Southerly: 165.83' along a stone wall to stone bound at Lowell 
Street; thence Easterly: along the northerly line of Lowell Street as laid out in 1908 and 1957 to a point of 
beginning; or do anything in relation thereto. On petition of Minot J. Anderson and others. Finance 
Committee approved Planning Board Recommendations. 

Mr. John R. Evans read a report from the Planning Board relative to Article #36. The Planning Board 
voted unanimously to approve this article. Mr. Minot J. Anderson moved the adoption of the above article. 
A lengthy discussion followed. A motion to close arguments was voted unanimously. A standing vote on 
the main motion was taken. Yes 72 No 94 Motion LOST 



At this point a motion was made to reconsider Article #13. The vote was taken by voice and was LOST and 
so declared by the Moderator. 

ARTICLE 37: To see if the Town will direct the Selectmen to prepare a division of the Town into con- 
venient voting precincts in accordance with the General Laws (Tercentenary Edition) under the provisions 
of Chapter 54, Section 6, as amended, or do anything in relation thereto. On petition of Edward J. Sullivan 
and others. Finance Committee disapproved. 

Mr. Edward J. Sullivan moved the adoption of the above article. Discussion followed during which time the 
presence of quorum was doubted. A standing count was taken. There were 190 voters present. Further 
discussion followed. A motion to close arguments was lost by a voice vote. Doubted. A standing vote 
was taken. Yes 150 No 3 

The vote was taken on the main motion and LOST by a voice vote and so declared by the Moderator. Seven 
people stood to show doubt of the vote. A standing vote was taken. Yes 23 No 120 LOST 



Motion to adjourn voted. Adjourned at 7. 10 p. m. 

Total number of voters checked on the voting list 443. 

TOTAL VOTED AS FOLLOWS: 

By Taxation $2,481,867.87 
By Transfer 197,613.58 
By Borrowing 130, 750. 00 

Grand Total $2,810,231. 45 

Estimated Tax Rate 68. 64 

A true copy: 

Attest: (Mrs. ) Esther L. Russell 

Town Clerk 



107 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 30, 1962 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 



> 

>_ 
* j 



',10 



I 



TO: Either of the Constables of the Town of Wilmington: 

GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and in the manner prescribed in the By- 
laws of said Town, you are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of the Town qualified to vote 
in Town affairs to meet and assemble at the Herbert C. Barrows Auditorium on Monday, the Thirtieth Day 
of April at 8. 00 p. m. to consider and act on the following Articles - 

At this point in the reading of the Warrant, Mr. Charles H. Black moved to dispense with further reading of 
said Warrant. Voted unanimously. 



The Moderator declared that he would call each article by number if there were no objections to this pro- 
cedure. Unanimously agreed. 



ARTICLE 1: To see if the Town will vote to raise a sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing or otherwise and appropriate the same for the purpose of completing the construction 
and equipping and furnishing of the North Intermediate School, the Boutwell Street Elementary School, and 
the Glen Road Elementary School, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Permanent Building 
Committee. 

Finance Committee recommends total of $79,491.00 as follows:- 

Glen Road School 4,261.00 
Boutwell Street School 29, 230. 00 

North Intermediate School 46, 000. 00 



Motion by Mr. Erwin Hanke, Chairman of the Permanent Building Committee: "I move that the Town appro- 
priate the sum of $4, 261. 00 for the Glen Road Elementary School, $29, 230. 00 for the Boutwell Street 
Elementary School, and $46, 000. 00 for the North Intermediate School, said sums to be used at each location 
for completing the construction and original equipping and furnishing of said schools, that to meet this 
appropriation the Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen is authorized to issue $79, 491. 00 bonds or 
notes of the Town payable in not more than 20 years from their dates under Chapter 645 of the Acts of 1948 
i as amended and that the Permanent Building Committee is authorized to enter into contracts and do all 

things that are necessary for carrying out the work authorized by this vote. " 

Motion to amend offered by Mr. A. W. Lynch: "I move to amend by striking out the total sum of $79, 491. 00 

J and inserting in place thereof the sum of $124, 598. 00." Vote taken by a standing vote. Yes 187 

No 278 Motion to amend LOST. 

Second motion to amend offered by Mr. Roland Wood: "I move that the total sum to be appropriated 
$102, 091. 00; to strike out the amount of $79, 491. 00 and substitute $102, 091. 00. " Vote taken by voice and 
declared LOST by the Moderator. Seven voters stood to challenge the vote. Vote taken by standing - 
Yes 169 No 272 Motion to amend LOST. 

After a long discussion on recreational needs the previous question was called for. The Moderator read 
the main motion again. Vote was taken by voice and was declared unanimous by the Moderator. 

ARTICLE 2: To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to enter into and fully perform on 
behalf of the Town an agreement with Robert G. and Bernice A. Cowie providing as follows: 

1. That Robert G. and Bernice A. Cowie will convey to the Town a parcel of land owned by them on 
Ballardvale Street described as follows: A parcel of land with the buildings thereon bounded easterly by 
Ballardvale Street -- 75 ft. southerly by land of the Town of Wilmington -- 150 ft. westerly by land now or 



108 



ARTICLE 2 (continued): 

formerly of Signore -- 75 ft. , and northerly by said last mentioned land -- 150 ft. Being the same 
premises conveyed to Robert G. and Bernice A. Cowie by Samuel S. Thorpe and wife by deed recorded with 
Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds, Book 1317, Page 395. 

2. That in consideration for such conveyance, the Town will pay in cash or partly in cash and partly in con- 
veyance to said Robert G. and Bernice A. Cowie a parcel of land on said Ballardvale Street owned by it and 
described as follows: 

Beginning at an iron pipe inside the stone wall at the northwest corner of lot near land of Frank J. Melanson, 
thence running along Ballardvale Street S 15°35'E, 125.00 feet; thence S 67°- 05' W, 181.50 feet by land 
of the Town of Wilmington; thence N 15°- 35' W, 125. 00 feet by land of the Town of Wilmington; thence 
N 67° - 05' E, 181. 50 feet by land of Frank J. Melanson to the point of beginning. Other details of such 
agreement to be at the discretion of the Selectmen. 

The object of such agreement being to provide further land for the location of the Intermediate School, 
construction of which was provided for at the Special Town Meeting held November 28, I960. Any funds 
necessary for its performance to be supplied from the funds previously appropriated for said school, or do 
anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. Finance Committee recommends 
approval. 

Motion by Mr. Nicholas L. DeFelice: "I move that the Town vote to authorize the Selectmen to enter into 
and fully perform on behalf of the Town an agreement with Robert G. and Bernice A. Cowie providing as 
follows: 

1. That Robert G. and Bernice A. Cowie will convey to the Town a parcel of land owned by them on Ballard- 
vale Street described as follows: A parcel of land with the buildings thereon bounded easterly by Ballard- 
vale Street - 75 ft. , southerly by land of the Town of Wilmington - 150 ft. , westerly by land now or formerly 
of Signore - 75 ft. , and northerly by said last mentioned land - 150 ft. Being the same premises conveyed 
to Robert G. and Bernice A. Cowie by Samuel S. Thorpe and wife by deed recorded with Middlesex North 
District Registry of Deeds, Book 1317, Page 395. 

2. That in consideration for such conveyance, the Town will pay $14, 500. 00 in cash, and convey to said 
Robert G. and Bernice A Cowie a parcel of land on said Ballardvale Street owned by it and described as 
follows: Beginning at an iron pipe inside the stone wall at the northwest corner of lot near land of Frank J. 
Melanson, thence running along Ballardvale Street S 15° -35' E, 125.00 feet; thence S 67° - 05' W, 181. 50 
feet by land of the Town of Wilmington; thence N 150° -35' W, 125. 00 feet by land of the Town of Wilmington; 
thence N 67° - 05' E 181. 50 feet by land of Frank J. Melanson to the point of beginning. 

Other details of such agreement to be at the discretion of the Board of Selectmen and any funds necessary 
for its performance to be supplied from the funds previously appropriated for the North Intermediate School." 

Motion adopted unanimously. 

ARTICLE 3: To see how much money the Town will vote to appropriate to purchase the land and buildings 
on Middlesex Avenue formerly occupied by St. Thomas Church and to determine how such appropriation 
shall be raised, whether by taxation, transfer from available funds, by borrowing or otherwise, or do any- 
thing in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen and Library Trustees. Finance Committee 
recommends $15,000. 00 for purchase of land and buildings thereon. 

Motion by Mr. John Brooks: "I move that the Selectmen, a representative of the Library Trustees and the 
Town Manager be and they hereby are authorized to purchase for the use of the Town Library and other 
municipal purposes the land and buildings on Middlesex Avenue formerly occupied by St. Thomas Church, 
for the price of fifteen thousand dollars ($15, 000. 00) which sum is hereby appropriated for said purpose, 
and to meet said appropriation, the sum of nine thousand one hundred thirty- seven dollars and seventy-three 
cents ($9, 137. 73) is hereby transferred from the sale of real estate account, three thousand dollars ($3, 000) 



109 



ARTICLE 3 (continued): 

is hereby transferred from the dog pound construction and equipment account, and the balance of two thou- 
sand, eight hundred sixty-two dollars and twenty-seven cents ($2,862. 27) shall be raised by taxation. 

Mr. Brooks asked Mr. Philip Buzzell, Town Counsel and Library Trustee, for his opinion on the motion. 
Mr. Buzzell stated that he strongly endorses this motion. He felt that this was a sound and wise investment 
for whatever municipal use we can put it to but hopes it will be voted for an interim use as a library. 

Other Library Trustees spoke on the motion, some were in favor of this proposal and others were against it. 
After a lengthy discussion, the previous question was called for. A two-thirds vote was needed. Vote 
taken by standing - Yes 355 No 35 Discussion closed. 

The Moderator stated the main motion. Vote taken by standing Yes 356 No 98 Motion 

ADOPTED. 



ARTICLE 4: To see how much money the Town will vote to appropriate for repairs, alterations, or 
additions to the property on Middlesex Avenue formerly occupied by St. Thomas Church if the same is 
acquired by the Town, and to determine how such appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation, trans- 
fer from available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the 
Board of Selectmen and Library Trustees. Finance Committee recommends $15,000 for alterations and 
repairs to property. 

Motion by Mr. John Brooks: "I move that the sum of fifteen thousand dollars ($15, 000. 00) be raised by taxa- 
tion and appropriated for repairs, alterations or additions to be made to the property on Middlesex Avenue 
formerly occupied by St. Thomas Church following acquisition of the same by the town, in order to fit it 
for use by the Town Library. " Mr. Brooks stated that they were legally advised that this money will have 
to be raised by taxation, and that it would represent approximately seventy cents on the tax rate. 

^ The Finance Committee was asked by the Moderator how they recommended that this money be raised. 

q, Mr. R. Michelson answered by a bond issue (3-5 years) as presented in the request. 

[j 

Motion to amend offered by Mr. Larz Neilson: "I move to amend the motion to read: That a committee of 
three persons be appointed, to be called the Library Facilities Committee, to study the use of land and 
buildings on Middlesex Avenue formerly occupied by St. Thomas Church, and other such matters as may 
properly come to its attention, and to report to a subsequent Town Meeting, not later than the Annual Town 
Meeting of 1963; that this committee be appointed, one from each of three committees, viz, the Library 
Board of Trustees, the Planning Board, and the Permanent Building Committee, said appointments by the 
three committees as they deem best; that the sum of $500. 00 be raised and appropriated from taxes, for the 
expenses of this committee." Vote to amend taken by voice and LOST and so declared by the Moderator. 

Discussion followed on the main motion. The Moderator, Mr. Simon Cutter, asked the Finance Committee 
if they approved the motion as read. Mr. Robert Michelson said that the Finance Committee now approves 
that this money be raised by taxation. The previous question was called for and was voted by voice. Vote 
was Unanimous to close debate. The Moderator read the main motion again and called for a voice vote. 
The vote was Unanimous and the motion was ADOPTED. 



ARTICLE 5: To see what sum the Town will vote to appropriate for the purpose of acquiring, either by 
gift, purchase, taking by eminent domain, or otherwise, and either in fee or as an easement, a location 
for, and of laying in such location a water main of not more than twelve inches in diameter, across privately 
owned lands from Chestnut Street to Main Street, and determine how the appropriation shall be raised, 
whether by taxation, transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise, or do anything in relation 
thereto. Request of the Board of Water Commissioners. Finance Committee recommends $32,000. 00 - 
15 year bond issue. 

Motion by Mr. Waldo Stevens: "I move that the Board of Water Commissioners be and they are hereby 
authorized to acquire either by gift, purchase, taking by eminent domain, or otherwise, and either in fee or 



110 



ARTICLE 5 (continued): 

as an easement, a location for and of laying in such location a water main of twelve inches in diameter, 
across privately owned lands from Chestnut Street to Main Street, and to appropriate the sum of thirty-two 
thousand dollars ($32, 000. 00), and to meet such appropriation that the Treasurer with the approval of the 
Board of Selectmen be and is hereby authorized to borrow a sum or sums, not to exceed in the aggregate 
said amount, and to issue the bonds or notes of the Town therefor payable in not more than fifteen years. " 
During the discussion that followed a "point of order" was called five times because the debaters talked 
about Water Betterments on Butters Row, and this street was not mentioned in either the article or the 
motion. 

The previous question was called, and the vote was unanimous to close debate. The Moderator read the 

main motion again and called for a standing vote. Yes 278 No 14 Motion was adopted and 

so declared by the Moderator. 

ARTICLE 6: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of Three Thousand One 
Hundred Dollars ($3, 100. 00) for the purchase of a radio-equipped automobile for the Police Department or 
take any action in relation thereto. Request of the Chief of Police. Finance Committee recommends 
$3, 100. 00. 

Motion by Mr. Charles Black: '1 move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of 
Three Thousand One Hundred Dollars ($3, 100. 00) for the purchase of a radio-equipped automobile for the 
Police Department." A voter asked why this car was necessary. The Town Manager answered that it was 
to be used for investigation work and other related purposes. This car will be used 100% for police work. 

Motion was put to a vote by voice and was so voted unanimously. Motion adopted. 

ARTICLE 7: To see if the Town will vote to accept Chapter 48, Sections 36-36A of the General Laws or 
take any action in relation thereto. Request of the Chief of the Fire Department. Finance Committee 
disapproves. 

Motion by Mr. Cecil Lancaster, Town Manager. I move to pass over the article. Voted unanimously. 

ARTICLE 8: To see if the Town will vote to transfer the sum of $4, 036. 61 from the High School Athletic 
Field Account to the High School Construction Account or take any action in relation thereto. Request of 
the Town Accountant. Finance Committee recommends the transfer of that dollar amount necessary to 
close out the High School Construction Account as of April 19, 1962. 

Motion by Mr. Donald Kidder: "I move that the Town vote to transfer the sum of Three Thousand and Forty- 
four dollars and seven cents ($3, 044. 07) from the High School Athletic Field Account to the High School 
Construction Account." Mr. Fred T. Corum offered an amendment but the Moderator declared it illegal 
after some discussion with the Finance Committee and the Town Counsel. Main motion voted by voice un- 
animously. Motion adopted. 

ARTICLE 9: To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-law and Map by changing from Neigh- 
borhood Business District to Single Residence B District, the following described parcel of land: A certain 
parcel of land shown as Lot 123 on a plan known as "Wilmington Estates, North Wilmington, owned and 
developed by John D. Cooke, dated July, 1938, " Davis &t Abbott, Civil Engineers, recorded with the Middle- 
sex North District Registry of Deeds, Book of Plans 61, Plan 76, and bounded and described as follows: 
Northerly by Middlesex Avenue, one hundred eighteen (118) feet; Easterly by Lot 122 as shown on said plan; 
one hundred fifty-five and 67/100 (155. 67) feet; Southerly by Lot 121 as shown on said plan, one hundred 
sixty-three (163) feet, more or less; and Westerly by Lubbers Brook, as shown on plan, or do anything in 
relation thereto. Request of Richard V. Barry and others. Finance Committee - no action. 

Motion by Mr. Richard V. Barry who moved the adoption of the article as stated above. The Planning 
Board submitted a report on this article which was read by Mr. Fitzmaurice. The Planning Board recom- 
mends this change. A standing vote was taken Yes 140 No 31. Motion adopted. 

1 1 1 



The meeting was called to order at 8. 12 p. m. and adjourned at 1 1. 03 p. m. 



There were four hundred ninety-seven (497) voters checked on the voting list. 

Total Voted as follows: 

By Taxation $ 20,962.27 

By Transfer 15, 181.80 

By Borrowing 1 1 1 , 49 1 ■ 00 

Grand Total $147,635.07 

A true copy: (Mrs. ) Esther L. Russell 

Attest: Town Clerk 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - MAY 28, 1962 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 



TO: Either of the Constables of the Town of Wilmington. 

GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and in the manner prescribed in the By- 
laws of said Town, you are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of the Town qualified to vote 

^ in Town affairs to meet and assemble at the Herbert C. Barrows Auditorium on Monday, the twenty-eighth 

jg day of May next at 8. 00 p. m. to consider and act on the following articles. 

.2 

"j This much of the Warrant was read by the Moderator, Mr. Simon Cutter at which time Mr. Charles Black 

m moved that further reading of the Warrant be dispensed with. Voted. 

The Moderator declared that he would call each article by number if there were no objections to this pro- 



cedure. Unanimously agreed. 

ARTICLE 1: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of lay- 
ing a water main of not less than 6 inches, but less than 16 inches in diameter on Butters Row in accordance 
with the recommendations of the Board of Water Commissioners acting under the provisions of Chapter 332, 
Acts of 1955, and determine how the appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation, by transfer from 
available funds, by borrowing or otherwise, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of Leroy Bedell 
and others. Finance Committee voted to approve the sum of $40, 000. 00 by a 15-year bond issue with 

the understanding the Water Commissioners will take appropriate action to have rescinded Article 5 of the 
Special Town Meeting of April 30, 1962 if this article is approved. 

Motion by Mr. Leroy B. Bedell: "I move that the Town vote to raise by borrowing and appropriate the sum 
of $40, 000. 00 for the purpose of laying a water main of 12 inches in diameter in Butters Row from Chestnut 
Street to Main Street, under the provisions of Chapter 332, of the Acts of 1955, and to meet such appropria- 
tion that the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, be and hereby is authorized to issue 
bonds or notes of the Town therefor, payable in not more than 15 years." A voter asked Mr. Bedell to read 
the list of abutters. This he did. After a lengthy discussion the previous question was called for - to close 

debate. By a standing vote Yes 137 No 7 Voted. The Moderator called for a vote on the 

main motion, by a standing vote Yes 141 No 10 Motion carried. 



1 12 



ARTICLE 2: 



To see if the Town will vote to rescind the action taken under Article 20 of the Warrant for 



the Annual Meeting held March 10, 1962, providing for the reconstruction of a part of Salem Street and 
Ballardvale Street as shown on a plan on file with the Town Clerk and the appropriation of $21, 000. 00 by 
taxation, to cover the cost thereof, or do anything in relation thereto. Article 20, as voted at the Annual 
Town Meeting, fails to alleviate the existing hazardous condition. Request of the Planning Board. Finance 
Committee disapproved. Upon a motion by Mr. John R. Evans, it was voted to pass over Article 2. 

ARTICLE 3: To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, bond or transfer from available funds, a 
sum of money to provide and construct sidewalks on town property on a part of Salem Street and Ballardvale 
Street and to acquire either by gift, purchase, taking by eminent domain, or otherwise, either in fee or as 
easements any additional land from the terminus of the Town property on Ballardvale Street to State Route 
125 for said sidewalks or to do anything in relation thereto. The object of this article is to provide ade- 
quate means for the safety of school children to get to and from school. Request of the Planning Board. 
Finance Committee disapproved. Upon a motion by Mr. John R. Evans it was voted to pass over 

Article 3. 

ARTICLE 4: To see if the Town will vote to authorize and/or direct the Board of Selectmen to lay out a 
plan for the relocation and construction of a part of Salem Street and Ballardvale Street to the terminus of 
State Rt. 125 or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Planning Board. Finance Committee dis- 
approved. Upon a motion by Mr. John R. Evans it was voted to pass over Article 4. 



The meeting was called to order at 8.25 p. m. and voted to adjourn at 
Eighty-six (186) voters checked on the voting list. 



55 p. m. There were One Hundred 



A true copy: 
Attest: 



(Mrs. ) Esther L. Russell 
Town Clerk 



113 



m 



WARRANT FOR STATE PRIMARY - TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 1962 



Middlesex County ss. 

TO: Either of the Constables of the Town of Wilmington. 

GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to notify and warn the inhabitants 
of said Town who are qualified to vote in Primaries to meet in the High School Cafeteria, Church Street, 
Tuesday, the Eighteenth Day of September 1962, at 3.45 p.m. for the following purposes: 

To bring in their votes to the Primary Officers for the Nomination of Candidates of Political Parties for the 

following offices: 



>•- 
L 

(0> 

,5 
: j 



Senator in Congress 
Gove rnor 

Lieutenant Governor 

Attorney General 

Secretary of the Commonwealth 

Treasurer and Receiver-General 

Auditor of the Commonwealth 

Representative in Congress 

Councillor 

Senator 

2 - Representatives in General Court 
District Attorney 
County Commissioner 
Sheriff 

County Commissioner (to fill vacancy - 2 yrs. ) 
County Treasurer (to fill vacancy - 4 yrs. ) 



For this Commonwealth 



5th Congressional District 
6th Councillor District 
7th Senatorial District 
18th Representative District 
Northern District 
Middlesex County 
Middlesex County 
Middlesex County 
Middlesex County 



The polls will be open from 4. 00 p. m. to 8. 00 p. m. 
Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with your doings thereon at the time and place of said meetin; 
Given under our hands this 27th day of August, A. D. 1962. 



Signed: 



John Brooks ) 
Wavie M. Drew ) 
Charles H. Black ) 



Board of 
Selectmen 



MIDDLESEX, ss. 



RETURN OF SERVICE 
WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 



I this day posted attested copies of the within notice at the following locations: 



Town Hall, outside Bulletin Board 
Post Office, Middlesex Avenue 
Elia's Store, West Street 
Lucci's Market, Lowell Street 
Post Office, Main Street 
Tatersall's, Main Street 



all in said Wilmington 



Aug. 28, 1962 



(Signed) 
1 14 



A. John Imbimbo 
Constable of Wilmington 



STATE PRIMARY ELECTION - WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
HIGH SCHOOL CAFETERIA, CHURCH STREET - SEPTEMBER 18, 1962 



In accordance with the foregoing Warrant the meeting was called to order by the Warden, Harold E. Melzar, 
at 3. 50 p. m. The ballot boxes were examined by the Warden, Police Officer, ballot box clerks, and the 
Town Clerk. The ballot boxes were found to be empty and each box registered 00000. The keys of the 
ballot boxes were delivered to the Police Officer in charge. 

The Warden read the Warrant in its entirety. The election workers were sworn to the faithful performance 
of their duties. The Town Clerk delivered the ballots to the Warden and received his receipt for them. 
The ballots were delivered to the ballot clerks. 

The polls were declared open at 4. 00 p. m. 

Following is the result of the election as announced by the Warden: 



REPUBLICAN PARTY 



DEMOCRATIC PARTY 



Senator in Congress (to fill vacancy) 
George C. Lodge 
Laurence Curtis 
Blanks 

Governor 
John A. Volpe 
Blanks 



Lieutenant Governor 
Francis W. Perry 
Blanks 



Attorney General 
Edward W. Brooke 
Elliot L. Richardson 
Blanks 



Secretary 

Harris A. Reynolds 
Blanks 



T reasurer 

Joseph B. Grossman 
Francis Andrew Walsh 
Blanks 



446 
328 
18 
792 

756 
36 
792 



734 
58 
792 



475 
289 
28 
792 



711 
81 
792 



483 
241 
68 
792 



Senator in Congress (to fill vacancy) 
Edward M. Kennedy 
Edward J. McCormack, Jr. 
Blanks 

Governor 
Endicott Peabody 
Clement A. Riley 
Blanks 

Lieutenant Governor 
Francis X. Bellotti 
Herbert L. Connolly 
Blanks 

Attorney General 
James R. Lawton 
Francis E. Kelly 
Thomas L. McCormack 
Margaret F. McGovern 
Matthew L. McGrath, Jr. 
Blanks 

Secretary 
Kevin H. White 
Others 
Blanks 

T reasurer 

John Thomas Driscoll 
John F. Kennedy 
John M. Kennedy 
Blanks 



892 
367 
31 
1290 

1023 
221 
46 
1290 

656 
544 
90 
1290 

299 
432 
86 
313 
92 
68 
1290 

1135 
1 

154 
1290 

858 
287 
53 
92 
1290 



115 



REPUBLICAN PARTY 



DEMOCRATIC PARTY 



L. 

IB 
u 
,0 

i5 



Auditor 

Philip M. Walsh 
Blanks 

Congre s sman 

F. Bradford Morse 

Blanks 



Councillor 

T . Peter Russo 

Paul S. Vaitses, Jr. 

Other 

Blanks 



Senator 
Edwin H. 
Blanks 



Lombard 



Representatives in General Court 

Frank D. Tanner 

Kenneth C. Latham 

William L. Smith 

Blanks 

District Attorney 
William G. Andrew 
Arlyne F. Hassett 
Blanks 



County Commissioner 
George C. Ayotte 
James J. Flanagan 
Frederick Lowe 
Jesse A. Rogers 
Blanks 



Sheriff 
John F. 
Blanks 



Cahill 



County Commissioner (to fill vacancy) 
Alan I. Alford 
William B. Bailey 
James F. M. Cremin 
Albert L. Daigle 



694 
98 
792 

751 
41 
792 



182 
491 
1 

1 18 
792 

68 6 
106 
792 



668 
484 
233 
199 
1584 

521 
202 
69 
792 



152 
89 
211 
228 
112 
792 



683 
109 
792 



151 
277 
85 
76 



Auditor 

Thomas J. Buckley 
Blanks 



Congressman 
Thomas J. Lane 
Thomas J. Chiara 
Samuel S. Pollard 
Blanks 

Councillor 

Joseph Ray Crimmins 
Alexander A. Adams 
Arthur E. McGlinchey 
Blanks 

Senator 

James J. Long 
Patrick B. Brien 
Leo A. McCormack 
Harold W. McKelvey 
Charles L. Shea 
Blanks 

Representatives in General Court 



Thomas F. 

Others 

Blanks 



Donohue 



District Attorney 
John J. Droney 
John F. Cremens 
Albert R. Mezoff 
Blanks 

County Commissioner 
Thomas B. Brennan 
Hugh E. Buckley 
John P. Buckley 
James F. Hall 
John B. Twcrrey 
Blanks 

Sheriff 

Howard W. Fitzpatrick 
Salvatore S. Arena 
Blanks 

County Commissioners (to fill vacancy) 
George L. Andersen 
Thomas F. August 
William F. Barrett 
John E. Bowler 



1 129 
161 
1290 



570 
128 
533 
59 
1290 

662 
178 
340 
110 
1290 

413 
26 
253 
438 
96 
64 
1290 

1084 
8 

1488 
2580 



715 
441 
53 
81 
1290 

639 
200 
109 
103 
92 
147 
1290 

976 
231 
83 
1290 

64 
11 
35 
15 



116 



REPUBLICAN PARTY 



County Commissioner (to fill vacancy) 

Manuel S. Dias 

Blanks 



97 
106 
792 



County Treasurer (to fill vacancy) 
Weldon Hitchcock 
Frank D. Parker 
Blanks 



261 
424 
107 
792 



DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

County Commissioner (to fill vacancy) 

C. Michael Bradley 

Thomas J. Burke 

Edward J. Butler 

J. Earl Clinton 

James A. Cullen 

John F. Dever 

William J. Donovan 

Leonard F. Doyle 

Henry J. Dunn 

Gordon Faulkner 

Joseph Lopresti 

Harry J. Mclntire 

Adrian J. Sullivan 

Albert W. Zarella 

Blanks 

County Treasurer (to fill vacancy) 

Edward L. Buckley 

Rocco J. Antonelli 

Patrick J. Brennan 

Edwin R. Breslin 

John J. Carpenter 

John C. Carr 

Franklin J. Cronin 

Frank M. DeFino 

Francis J. Kenney 

John Sarno 

Blanks 



31 
90 
71 
10 

168 

162 
42 

160 
12 
71 
63 
16 
31 
21 

217 
1290 

605 
147 
57 
44 
20 
71 
35 
68 
41 
20 
182 
1290 



Total Republican Votes Cast 



792 



Total Democratic Votes Cast 



1290 



The Polls were declared closed at 8. 00 p. m. 
Ballot Box marked A - K read 1040 ballots cast. 
Ballot Box marked L - Z read 1042 ballots cast. 
Total ballots cast at this election - 2082. 



Ballots received from the State House 

Less ballots cast 

Less One (1) spoiled ballot 

Unused ballots 



6782 
2082 

1_ 

4699 



- in six boxes said to contain 6782 ballots 



A true copy: 
Attest: 



(Mrs. ) Esther L. Russell 
Town Clerk 



117 



STATE ELECTION 



November 6, 1962 High School Gymnasium, Church Street Wilmington, Massachusetts 

TO: Either of the Constables of the Town of Wilmington. 

GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and in the manner prescribed in the By- 
laws of said Town, you are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of the Town qualified by law to 
vote, to meet and assemble at the High School Gymnasium on Tuesday, the sixth day of November next at 
5. 45 o'clock in the forenoon, the polls to be open at 6. 00 a. m. , and shall be closed at 8. 00 p. m. , for the 
election of the following: Senator in Congress, Governor, Lieutenant Governor, Attorney General, Secretary 
of the Commonwealth, Treasurer, Auditor, Representative in Congress, Councillor, Senator, 2 Repre- 
sentatives in General Court, District Attorney, County Commissioner, Sheriff, County Commissioner (to 
fill vacancy), County Treasurer (to fill vacancy) and vote YES or NO on the following questions: 

QUESTION NO. 1 - PROPOSED AMENDMENT TO THE CONSTITUTION. 



Do you approve of the adoption of an amendment to the constitution summarized below which was approved 
by the General Court in a joint session of the two branches held May 13, 1959, received 143 votes in the 
affirmative and 118 in the negative, and in a joint session of the two branches held March 29, 1961, received 
144 votes in the affirmative and 121 in the negative? YES NO 

SUMMARY: The proposed amendment imposes no new taxes but gives the General Court the power to pass 
an income tax at graduated or proportioned rates and is a change in the constitutional limitations now in 
effect on the power of the General Court to pass tax measures. The proposed amendment would add a new 
Article to the Constitution of the Commonwealth by which full power and authority is granted to the General 
Court, in the alternative to the power and authority to tax incomes in the manner provided in Article XLIV 
^ of the Amendments to the Constitution, to impose a tax on incomes at rates which are proportioned or 

JS, graduated according to the amount of income received, irrespective of the source from which it may be de- 

0. rived, and to grant reasonable exemptions, deductions and abatements. It further provides that any pro- 

' J perty the income of which is taxed under the provisions of the proposed Article may be exempted from the 

imposition and levying of proportional and reasonable assessments, rates and taxes as at present authorized 
by the Constitution, and that the Article shall not be construed to limit the power of the General Court to 
impose and levy reasonable duties and excises. 

b 

J QUESTION NO. 2 - LAW SUBMITTED UPON REFERENDUM AFTER PASSAGE. 

Do you approve of a law summarized below, which was approved by both branches of the General Court by 
vote not recorded? YES NO 



J SUMMARY: This act increases the compensation each member of the General Court shall receive for each 

■ , regular annual session from fifty-two hundred dollars to sixty-seven hundred dollars and increases the 

additional compensation of the President of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives shall 
receive from fifty-two hundred dollars to sixty-seven hundred dollars. The act also increases the addition- 
al compensation the floor leaders of the major political parties in the Senate and House of Representatives, 
the Chairman of the Senate Committee on Ways and Means and the Chairman and Vice-Chairman of the House 
Committee on Ways and Means shall receive from twenty-six hundred dollars to thirty-three hundred and 
fifty dollars, and provides that a member of the General Court chosen to fill a vacancy, or who resigns his 
seat during a regular annual session, shall receive a per diem compensation at the increased rate of com- 
pensation for each regular annual session. 

QUESTION NO. 3 



A. Shall licenses be granted in this town for the sale therein of all alcoholic beverages (whisky, rum, gin, 
malt beverages, wines and all other alcoholic beverages)? YES NO 

118 



QUESTION No. 3 



B. Shall licenses be granted in this town for the sale therein of wines and malt beverages (wines and beer, 
ale and all other malt beverages)? YES NO 



C. Shall licenses be granted in this town for the sale therein of all alcoholic beverages in packages, so 
called, not to be drunk on the premises? YES NO 



QUESTION No. 4 

A. Shall the pari-mutuel system of betting on licensed horse races be permitted in this county? YES 

NO 

B. Shall the pari-mutuel system of betting on licensed dog races be permitted in this county? YES 

NO 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this Warrant, or a certified copy thereof, with your doings thereon, 
to the Town Clerk, as soon as may be and before said meeting. 

GIVEN UNDER OUR HANDS AND SEAL OF SAID TOWN THIS 24TH DAY OF OCTOBER, A. D. , ONE 
THOUSAND NINE HUNDRED AND SIXTY-TWO. 

Signed John Brooks 

Wavie M. Drew 
Nicholas L. DeFelice 
Charles H. Black 
Donald C. Kidder 



Board of 
Selectmen 



RETURN OF SERVICE 
WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 

Middlesex, SS October 25, 1962 

I this day posted attested copies (seven) of the within Warrant for State Election, at the following locations: 
Bulletin Board at the Town Hall (outside); Post Office, Middlesex Avenue; Elia's Store, West Street; 
Lucci's Market, Lowell Street; Post Office, Main Street; Tattersall's, Main Street; and the Police Station, 
Adelaide Street, all in said Wilmington. 

Signed A. John Imbimbo 

Constable of Wilmington 

A true copy: (Mrs. ) Esther L. Russell 

Attest: Town Clerk 

In accordance with the foregoing warrant the meeting was called to order by the Warden, Harold E. Melzar, 
at 5. 45 a.m. The Warrant was read to include all offices to be elected at which time Mrs. Olive Sheldon 
moved to dispense with further reading of said warrant. Seconded and so voted. The ballot boxes were 
examined by the Warden, Police Officer, ballot box clerks and the Town Clerk. The ballot boxes were 
found to be empty and each box registered 00000. The keys to the ballot boxes were delivered to the Police 
Officer in charge. 

The election workers were sworn to the faithful performance of their duties. The Town Clerk delivered the 
ballots to the Warden and received his receipt for thsm. The ballots were then delivered to the oallot clerks. 

The polls were declared open at 6. 00 a. m. 



119 



i_ 

At 
i- 

; j 

'2 



15 



| 



FOLLOWING IS THE RESULT OF THE ELECTION AS ANNOUNCED BY THE WARDEN : 
Senator in Congress (to fill vacancy) 

Edward M. Kennedy, Two Thousand Three Hundred Fifty-nine 

George C. Lodge, Two Thousand Two Hundred Five 

Lawrence Gilfedder, Four 

H. Stuart Hughes, Eighty-four 

Mark R. Shaw, O n e 

Blanks, Twenty-six 

Others, Three 

Governor 

John A. Volpe, Two Thousand Five Hundred Forty 
Endicott Peabody, Two Thousand One Hundred Eleven 
Henmng A Blomen, Four 
Guy S. Williams, Three 
Blanks, Twenty-two 
Others, Two 

Lieutenant Governor 

Francis X. Bellotti, Two Thousand One Hundred Eighty-one 
Francis W. Perry, Two Thousand Four Hundred Thirteen 
Thomas Maratea, Nine 
Francis A. Votano, Seven 
Blanks, Seventy-two 

Attorney General 

Edward W. Brooke, Two Thousand Seven Hundred Eighty-two 
Francis E. Kelly, One Thousand Eight Hundred Twenty 
Edgar E. Gaudet, Seven 
Howard B. Rand, Nine 
Blanks, Sixty-two 
Others, Two 

Secretary 

Kevin H. White, Two Thousand Seven Hundred Eighty 

Harris A. Reynolds, One Thousand Seven Hundred Seventy-six 

John Erlandson, Eleven 

Julia B. Kohler, Nine 

Blanks, One Hundred Six 

T reasur er 

John Thomas Driscoll, Two Thousand Seven Hundred Sixty-five 
Joseph B. Grossman, One Thousand Seven Hundred Eighty-five 
Isaac Goddard, Fourteen 
Arne A. Sortell, Eight 
Blanks, One Hundred Ten 

Auditor 

Thomas J. Buckley, Three Thousand One Hundred Fourteen 
Philip M. Walsh, One Thousand Four Hundred Fifty-three 
Louise T. Metays, Eleven 
Ethelbert L. Nevens, Six 
Blanks, Ninety-eight 



Vote s 

2359 
2205 
4 
84 
1 

26 

3 

4682 

2540 
2111 

4 

3 
22 

2 

4682 

2181 
2413 

9 

7 
72 
4682 

2782 
1820 

7 

9 
62 

2 

4682 

2780 
1776 
1 1 
9 

106 
4682 

2765 
1785 
14 
8 

110 
4682 

31 14 
1453 
1 1 

6 ' 
98 
4682 



120 



Congressman Votes 
Thomas J. Lane, One Thousand Eight Hundred Seventy-six 1876 
F. Bradford Morse, Two Thousand Seven Hundred Forty-five 2745 
Blanks, Sixty-one 61 

4682 

Councillor 

Joseph Ray Crimmins, Two Thousand Five Hundred Eighty-six 2586 
Paul S. Vaitses, Jr. , One Thousand Eight Hundred Eighty-three 1883 
Blanks, Two Hundred Twelve 212 
Others, One 1 

4682 

Senator 

James J. Long, Two Thousand Six Hundred Sixty-nine 2669 
Edwin H. Lombard, One Thousand Eight Hundred Seventy-four 1874 
Blanks, One Hundred Thirty-nine 139 

4682 

Representatives in General Court 

Thomas F. Donohue, Two Thousand Five Hundred Ninety-nine 2599 
Frank D. Tanner, Two Thousand Four Hundred Ninety-six 2496 
John A. Berlandi, One Thousand Three Hundred Twenty- seven 1327 
Kenneth C. Latham, One Thousand Six Hundred Fifty-nine 1659 
Blanks, One Thousand Two Hundred Eighty-three 1283 

9364 

District Attorney 

John J. Droney, Two Thousand Six Hundred Fifty-six 2656 
William G. Andrew, One Thousand Eight Hundred Seventy-five 1875 
Blanks, One Hundred Fifty 150 
Others, One 1 

4682 

County Commissioner 

Thomas B. Brennan, Two Thousand Five Hundred Forty 2540 
Jesse A. Rogers, One Thousand Nine Hundred Fifty 1950 
Blanks, One Hundred Ninety-two 192 

4682 

Sheriff 

Howard W. Fitzpatrick, Two Thousand Five Hundred Ninety-two 2592 
John F. Cahill, One Thousand Nine Hundred Twenty-two 1922 
Blanks, One Hundred Sixty- seven 167 
Others, One 1 

4682 



County Commissioner (vacancy) 

William B. Bailey, Two Thousand One Hundred Forty-six 2146 
John F. Dever, Jr. , Two Thousand Three Hundred Twenty-seven 2327 
Blanks, Two Hundred Nine 209 

4682 

County Treasurer (vacancy) 

Edward L. Buckley, Two Thousand Five Hundred Ninety-four 2594 
Frank D. Parker, One Thousand Eight Hundred Seventy 1870 
Blanks, Two Hundred Eighteen 218 

4682 

QUESTION NO. 1 - PROPOSED AMENDMENT TO THE CONSTITUTION 



Do you approve of the adoption of an amendment to the constitution summarized below which was approved 
by the General Court in a joint session of the two branches held May 13, 1959, received 143 votes in the 
affirmative and 118 in the negative, and in a joint session of the two branches held March 29, 1961, 
received 144 votes in the affirmative and 121 in the negative? (See summary in Warrant) 



121 



QUESTION NO. 1 (continued) 
Yes, Five Hundred Fifty-five 
No, Three Thousand Seven Hundred Nine 
Blanks, Four Hundred Eighteen 

QUESTION NO. 2 - LAW SUBMITTED UPON REFERENDUM AFTER PASSAGE 

Do you approve of a law summarized below, which was approved by both branches of the General Court by 
vote not recorded? (See summary in Warrant) 



Votes 

555 
3709 
418 
4682 



Yes, Six Hundred Eleven 

No, Three Thousand Five Hundred Sixty-two 
Blanks, Five Hundred Nine 

QUESTION NO. 3 



611 
3562 

509 
4682 



A. Shall licenses be granted in this city (or town) for the sale therein of all alcoholic beverages (whisky, 
rum, gin, malt beverages, wines and all other alcoholic beverages)? 



Yes, One Thousand Thirty-six 

No, Three Thousand Two Hundred Thirty-two 

Blanks, Four Hundred Fourteen 

B. Shall licenses be granted in this city (or town) for the sale therein of wines and malt beverages 
(wines and beer, ale and all other malt beverages)? 
Yes, One Thousand Fourteen 
No, Three Thousand Seventy-nine 
Blanks, Five Hundred Eighty-nine 



1036 
3232 
414 
4682 



1014 
3079 
589 
4682 



L. 

IB 
i- 

,0 
"J 



!| 
» > 



C. Shall licenses be granted in this city (or town) for the sale therein of all alcoholic beverages in packages 
so called, not to be drunk on the premises? 



Yes, Three Thousand Three Hundred Eighty-eight 

No, Nine Hundred Fifty 

Blanks, Three Hundred Forty-four 



QUESTION NO. 4 



A. Shall the pari-mutuel system of betting on licensed horse races be permitted in this county? 
Yes, Two Thousand Seventeen 

No, Two Thousand Three Hundred Twenty-eight 
Blanks, Three Hundred Thirty-seven 

B. Shall the pari-mutuel system of betting on licensed dog races be permitted in this county? 
Yes, One Thousand Eight Hundred Seventy-two 

No, Two Thousand Three Hundred Sixty 
Blanks, Four Hundred Fifty 



3388 
950 
344 

4682 



2017 
2328 
337 
4682 



1872 
2360 
450 
4682 



Twenty-eight Absentee Ballots were cast, after the polls were closed. 
TOTAL VOTE CAST - Four Thousand Six Hundred Eighty-two. 
The Polls were declared closed at 8. 00 p. m. 

Ballot Box marked A - K read 2220 fclose of polls. A - K ballot box amended to read 2248 after Absentee 

Ballots were cast therein. 

Ballot Box marked L - Z read 2429. 



122 



STATE-WIDE RECOUNT OF THE VOTES CAST FOR GOVERNOR ON NOVEMBER 6, 1962 



Recount was held at the Wildwood School on Wildwood Street, Wilmington, Massachusetts on Saturday, 
December 1, 1962 at 9. 30 a. m. 

Telegram #1: Town Clerk, Wilmington, Massachusetts - November 7, 1962 

Due to closeness of vote for Governor State Wide recount probable. 
Attention directed to GL 54 S-109, 134 and 135 hereby notified 
that ballots for Nov. 6th election may be impounded. Further 
instructions to follow. 

Signed, Kevin H. White, Secretary ofthe Commonwealth 

Telegram #2: Town Clerk, Wilmington, Massachusetts - November 8, 1962 

For purposes of clarification here is most recent directive of 
Attorney General to Police. 

"The directive of the Attorney General with reference to Police 
surveillance ofthe ballots, ballot boxes, containers, voting 
machines, and records of election officers concerning the State 
Election held Tuesday November six 1962 is not to be construed 
as divesting the various town and city clerks of custody of 
said ballots, ballot boxes, containers, voting machines and 
records, all of which are to remain in the custody of the various 
city and town clerks but to be placed under Police surveillance. " 

Signed, Kevin H. White, Secretary of the Commonwealth 

TO CITY AND TOWN CLERKS AND ELECTION COMMISSIONERS: November 21, 1962 

WHEREAS, - petitions have been filed with the State Secretary, in the interest of John A. Volpe of 
Winchester, Republican candidate for the office of Governor, for state-wide recounts of ballots cast at the 
election held November 6, 1962, for the office of Governor of the Commonwealth, under the provisions ol 
General Laws, Chapter 54, Section 135, as amended; and 

WHEREAS, - after the official tabulation of votes by the Governor and Council it appears that the difference 
in the number of votes cast for the two leading candidates for the office of Governor is less than one half of 
one per cent of the total number of votes cast for such office; 

THEREFORE, under the provisions of said section 135, as amended, it becomes my duty to, and I do hereby, 
order the clerk of each city and town of the Commonwealth to transmit forthwith, and said clerk shall so 
transmit, the envelopes containing the ballots, sealed, to the registrars of the city of town who shall, with- 
out unnecessary delay, open the envelopes, recount the ballots cast for said office and determine the 
questions raised. 

Signed, Kevin H. White, Secretary of the Commonwealth 
TO ALL CITY AND TOWN CLERKS AND ELECTION COMMISSIONERS: 

The following is the statement appearing on the petition for recount filed with this office in the interest of 
John A. Volpe, candidate for Governor: 

"TO THE SECRETARY OF THE COMMONWEALTH: STATE HOUSE, BOSTON 
Boston, Massachusetts 

"We, the undersigned registered voters of County, represent that we have reason to believe 

and do believe that the returns of the Election Officers, and the records or copies made by the Election 
Officers of the Commonwealth of the votes cast at the ELECTION on Tuesday, November 6, 1962, for 
JOHN A. VOLPE of Winchester and ENDICOTT PEABODY of Cambridge, and all other candidates for 



123 



Governor of the Commonwealth are erroneous, in that JOHN A. VOLPE of Winchester, Republican Candi- 
date for said office, was credited with fewer votes than he was entitled to, and ENDICOTT PEABODY of 
Cambridge, Democratic Candidate for said office was credited with more votes than he was entitled to, and 
in particular without restricting the generality of the foregoing, that votes were counted for ENDICOTT 
PEABODY which should have been counted for JOHN A. VOLPE, that votes were counted as blanks which 
should have been counted for JOHN A. VOLPE, that votes were counted for ENDICOTT PEABODY which 
should have been counted as blanks and that there are errors in the records and the returns of the count and 
that votes were cast and recorded for ENDICOTT PEABODY which may be the subject of lawful challenge, 
and we believe a recount of the ballots cast in the several voting precincts of the Commonwealth will affect 
the election for said office. We therefore ask that all votes cast for all candidates for Governor of the 
Commonwealth be recounted as provided for in the General Laws. 

TO ALL CITY AND TOWN CLERKS AND ELECTION COMMISSIONERS: November 23, 1962 

This letter is to advise you of the filing with this office of a second petition for state-wide recount in the in- 
terest of Endicott Peabody, on Wednesday. 

Inasmuch as a state -wide recount for the office of Governor of the Commonwealth has already been ordered 
and recount procedures are now in progress throughout the state, this is not in the nature of a second form 
al order for such a recount, but rather to apprise all clerks and election commissioners of the filing of the 
second petition. The one recount will, of course, serve both petitions. 

In order that you may know the content of the statement on the petition for Endicott Peabody, a mimeo- 
graphed copy is enclosed. 

Signed, Kevin H. White, Secretary of the Commonwealth. 

The following is the statement appearing on the petition for recount filed with this office in the interest of 
Endicott Peabody, candidate for Governor: 

"TO THE SECRETARY OF THE COMMONWEALTH: STATE HOUSE, BOSTON, 
Boston, Massachusetts 

"We, the undersigned registered voters of County, represent that we have reason to 

believe and do believe that the returns of the Election Officers and the records or copies made by the 
Election Officers of the Commonwealth of the votes cast at the ELECTION on Tuesday, November 6, 1962, 
for ENDICOTT PEABODY of Cambridge and JOHN A. VOLPE of Winchester, and all other candidates for 
Governor of the Commonwealth are erroneous, in that ENDICOTT PEABODY of Cambridge, Democratic 
Candidate for said office, was credited with fewer votes than he was entitled to, and JOHN A. VOLPE of 
Winchester, Republican Candidate for said office was credited with more votes than he was entitled to, an< 
in particular without restricting the generality of the foregoing, that votes were counted fpr JOHN A. VOL 
which should have been counted for ENDICOTT PEABODY, that votes were counted as blanks which should 
have been counted for ENDICOTT PEABODY, that votes were counted for JOHN A. VOLPE which should 
have been counted as blanks and that there are errors in the records and the returns of the count and that 
votes were cast and recorded for JOHN A. VOLPE which may be the subject of lawful challenge, and we 
believe a recount of the ballots cast in the several voting precincts of the Commonwealth will affect the 
election for said office. We therefore ask that all votes cast for all candidates for Governor of the 
Commonwealth be recounted as provided for in the General Laws. " 

All election materials used at the November State Election, as outlined by the Secretary of the Common- 
wealth were taken to the Police Station on November 7, 1962 and placed under police surveillance but re ~9 
mained in the custody of the town clerk. The town clerk used cell #1 and secured it with a chain and locks 
the keys retained by the clerk. Police Chief Paul Lynch directed his officers to check the cell to be sure 
it was locked when they took over their respective shift. On file in this office a signed time-sheet of the 
officers involved. 



Letters were sent on November 26, 1962 to all the candidates for the office of Governor noting the time ar 
place of the recount. Return receipts on file. 

124 



Twenty tellers were used (10 teams - 1 Democrat and 1 Republican to a team). The tellers reported at 

9.30 a.m. and were sworn to the faithful performance of their duties. Counting did not begin until 10. 30 a.m. 

because of the late arrival of one counsel. Total time to count the ballots one and one -half hours. 

There were six (6) protested ballots which are held pending court action. 

RECOUNT TALLY - for Governor 



John A. Volpe, Two Thousand Five Hundred Thirty (LOST 10) 
Endicott Peabody, Two Thousand One Hundred Eighteen (GAINED 7) 
Henning A. Blomen, Six (GAINED 2) 
Guy S. Williams, Five (GAINED 2) 
Blanks, Twenty-two 



Vote s 
2530 
2 118 



6 
5 
22 



TOTAL VOTES CAST FOR GOVERNOR 



4681 



A true copy: 
Attest: 



(Mrs. ! Esther L. Russell 
Town Clerk 



125 



WARRANT 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 



TO: Either of the Constables of the Town of Wilmington: 

GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and in the manner prescribed in the By- 
laws of said Town, you are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of the Town qualified to vote 
in Town affairs to meet and assemble at the 

HIGH SCHOOL CAFETERIA 
Saturday, the 2nd Day of March, A. D. 1963 

at 9. 45 o'clock in the forenoon, the polls to be opened at 10. 00 a. m. , and shall be closed at 8. 00 p. m. , 
for the election of Town Offices: 

ARTICLE 1: To bring in your votes on one ballot respectively for the following named Offices, to wit: 
Two Selectmen for the term of three years; Two Members of the School Committee for the term of three 
years; One Moderator for the term of one year; and One Member of the Wilmington Housing Authority for 
the term of five years. 

You are also hereby further required and directed to notify and warn the said inhabitants of the Town of 
Wilmington who are qualified to vote on elections and town affairs therein to assemble subsequently and 
meet in Town Meeting at the High School Gymnasium, Church Street, in said Town of Wilmington 

on 

Saturday, the 9th Day of March, A. D. 1963 
at 1. 30 p. m. , then and there to act on the following Articles: 

ARTICLE 2: To hear the reports of Committees and act thereon. 

ARTICLE 3: To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Select 
men, to borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the financial year, beginning 
January 1, 1964, and to issue notes therefor payable within one year, all in accordance with Sections 4 and 
17, Chapter 44, of the General Laws. 

ARTICLE 4: To see how much money the Town will appropriate for the expenses of the Town and Salaries 
of the several Town Offices, and Departments, and determine how the same shall be raised, whether by 
taxation, transfer from available funds, or otherwise, or do anything in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 5: To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Permanent Building Committee to construct an 
elementary school on land acquired by the Town off Woburn Street and to see if the Town will vote to raise 
and appropriate a sum of money for constructing and originally equipping and furnishing said elementary 
school, determine how the appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing, or otherwise, and to authorize and instruct the Permanent Building Committee to 
enter into contracts and do all things that are necessary for constructing, equipping and furnishing said 
elementary school, or take any action relative thereto. On request of the Permanent Building Committee. 1 

ARTICLE 6: To see if the Town will determine by vote, as authorized by the provisions of Section 6 of 
Chapter 297 of the Acts of 1958, what proportion the town will pay of the cost of the system of sewerage anc 
sewage disposal, said cost to be determined on the basis of the estimated whole cost to the Town of the 
complete system of sewerage to serve the Town, including the whole share of the cost of admission to the 
north metropolitan sewerage district, and that the remaining cost of said system of sewerage shall be 
provided for by assessment on the abutters, and by means of any or all of the methods permitted by the 
General Laws, and that provisions of said General Laws, relative to the assessment, apportionment, 
division, re -as se s sment , abatement and collection of sewer assessments, to liens therefor, and to interesl 
thereon shall apply to assessments made hereunder, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the 
Board of Water and Sewer Commissioners. 



126 



ARTICLE 7: To see how much money the Town will raise by taxation, or transfer from available funds, 
and appropriate for the purchase of an Accounting Machine for the use of the Town, or do anything in rela- 
tion thereto. Request of the Temporary Town Manager. 

ARTICLE 8: To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available 
funds and appropriate for the purchase of a generator for the use of the Police Department, or do anything 
in relation thereto. Request of the Temporary Town Manager. 

ARTICLE 9: To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation, or transfer from available 
funds and appropriate for the purchase of two vehicles for the use of the Police Department, and authorize 
the sale or turn-in of two present vehicles used by the Police Department, or do anything in relation thereto. 
Request of the Temporary Town Manager. 

ARTICLE 10: To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation, or transfer from available 
funds and appropriate for the purchase of a truck for the use of the Highway Department and authorize the 
sale or turn-in of a truck presently used by the Highway Department, or do anything in relation thereto. 
Request of the Temporary Town Manager. 

ARTICLE 11: To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available funds a sum of 
money not to exceed Three Thousand Dollars ($3,000. 00}- and appropriate the sum for an additional building 
to be used for garaging cemetery equipment, or take any action in relation thereto. Request of the 
Cemetery Commissioners. 

ARTICLE 12: To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available funds a sum of 
money not to exceed Two Thousand Dollars ($2, 000. 00) and appropriate the sum for hot topping Avenues in 
Wildwood Cemetery as far as the money will permit, or take any action in relation thereto. Request of the 
Cemetery Commissioners. 

ARTICLE 13: To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available funds a sum of 
money not to exceed Twenty-five Hundred Dollars ($2, 500. 00) and appropriate the sum for certain hot 
topping around the Wildwood, Whitefield and Buzzell Schools, as far as the money will permit, or take any 
action in relation thereto. Request of the Temporary Town Manager. 

ARTICLE 14: To see how much money the Town will raise by taxation, or transfer from available funds, 
and appropriate for the extension of the fire alarm system, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of 
the Temporary Town Manager. 

ARTICLE 15: To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, or transfer from available funds, and 
appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of paying unpaid bills of previous years, or do anything in re- 
lation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. 

ARTICLE 16: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of One Thousand Dollars 
($1, 000. 00) for the observance of Memorial Day and that the Moderator appoint a Committee who shall 
arrange and have charge of such observance, or do anything in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 17: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of Seven Hundred Fifty 
Dollars ($750. 00) for the purpose of renewing under authority of Section 9 of Chapter 40 of the General Laws 
as amended, the lease of the American Legion Clubhouse, Inc. in Wilmington for the purpose of providing 
suitable headquarters for the Wilmington Post No. 136 of the American Legion, or do anything in relation 
thereto. 

ARTICLE 18: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of Seven Hundred Fifty 
Dollars ($750. 00) for the purpose of renewing under authority of Section 9 of Chapter 40 of the General Laws 
as amended, the lease of the Veterans of Foreign Wars Clubhouse on Main Street for the purpose of provid- 
ing suitable headquarters for the Nee -Ellsworth Post 2458 of the Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United 
States, or do anything in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 19: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money under the authority of 
Section 9 of Chapter 40 of the General Laws, as amended, for the purpose of providing suitable quarters 
for the William F. Tattersall Chapter No. 106, Disabled American Veterans, located in Wilmington, Mass. 
or do anything in relation thereto. 

127 




ARTICLE 20: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of One Hundred Dollars ($100) 
the money to be expended under the direction of the 4-H Town Committee, serving in cooperation with the 
Middlesex County Extension Service, under the provisions of Sections 40 to 45, Chapter 128, General Laws 
of Massachusetts, or do anything in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 21: To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available funds and appro- 
priate a sum of money for the purchase of a parcel of land for the construction of a pedway to and from the 
Wildwood School, as described. 

ARTICLE 22: To see if the Town will raise by taxation or transfer from available funds, and appropriate 
a sum of money for the construction of a pedway to and from the Wildwood School on the parcel of land as 
described in the preceeding article, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. 

ARTICLE 23: To see if the Town will vote to accept and construct the relocation of a portion of Boutwell 
Street as a public town way as laid out by the Board of Selectmen and submitted to the Planning Board 
according to a plan filed with the office of the Town Clerk and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to take 
by Right of Eminent Domain such land, slope and drainage and other easements as may be necessary to 
effect the purpose of the Article and to see how much money the Town will appropriate for said purpose and 
determine how such appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation, by transfer from available funds in 
the treasury, or otherwise, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. 

ARTICLE 24: To see if the Town will vote to accept Drury Lane from School Street to Glen Road, Loumac 
Road from Drury Lane to the end, and School Street from the Buzzell School to the dead end, as public ways 
or do anything in relation thereto. Request of Edna E. Berger and others. 

ARTICLE 25: To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way the layout of Cedar Crest Road as 
approved by the Planning Board and made by the Selectmen under the provisions of law relating to the assess 
ment of Betterments, which layout is filed in the office of the Town Clerk, and which, with plans therein 
mentioned is hereby referred to for more particular description; and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
take by the Right of Eminent Domain such land, slope and drainage or other easements as may be necessary 
to effect the purpose of this Article, and to determine how an appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxa 
tion or by transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise, for the purpose of constructing said 
way and for the payment of any damages resulting from the taking of land and slope easements and other 
easements therefor, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. 

ARTICLE 26: To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way the layout of Reading Avenue as 
approved by the Planning Board and made by the Selectmen under the provisions of law relating to the 
assessment of Betterments, which layout is filed in the office of the Town Clerk, and which, with plans 
therein mentioned is hereby referred to for more particular description; and to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to take by the Right of Eminent Domain such land, slope and drainage or other easements as may 
be necessary to effect the purpose of this Article, and to determine how an appropriation shall be raised, 
whether by taxation or by transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise, for the purpose of 
constructing said way and for the payment of any damages resulting from the taking of land and slope ease- 
ments and other easements therefor, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. 

ARTICLE 27: To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-law and Map, particularly a zoning 
amendment voted at a Town Meeting July L, 1959, (Article 4) by striking out the description of the parcel 
there set forth, and substituting the following description; that parcel of land bounded by Main Street, 
Shawsheen Avenue, Boston and Maine Railroad and Bridge Lane, or do anything in relation thereto. Reques 
of the Building Inspector and Town Clerk. 

ARTICLE 28: To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-law and Map, particularly a zoning 
amendment (Article 44) voted March 12, "I960 by striking out the description of the parcel of land set forth 
therein, and substituting the following description; that parcel of land on the easterly side of Main Street, 
starting 400 feet northerly from Clark Street and extending northerly 1650' along Main Street, depth varying 
from 400' to 1300' and comprising entirely and exclusively a parcel shown as an Industrial District on the 
official Zoning Map adopted November 28, 1955, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Building 
Inspector and Town Clerk. 

1 28 



ARTICLE 29: To see if the Town will vote to extend the present Neighborhood Business Zone located on the 
south side of Lowell Street and the east side of Woburn Street, Wilmington, Massachusetts as follows: 
Starting at the southeasterly point of the existing Neighborhood Business Zone on Lowell Street and following 
southeasterly along Lowell Street for three hundred feet (300') and turning 90° south and running four hun- 
dred feet (400') and turning 90° west and running parallel to Lowell Street to a point of intersection with 
Woburn Street and then turning north to a point of intersection on Woburn Street with the existing Neighbor- 
hood Business Zone , or do anything in relation thereto. Request of John A. Lucci, Jr. , and others. 

ARTICLE 30: To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-law and Map by extending the present 
General Business Area to include the following parcel of land - Beginning at the corner of Lowell and West 
Streets westerly along the northerly side of Lowell Street 480 feet, thence northerly parallel to West Street 
450 feet, thence easterly parallel to Lowell Street 450 feet, thence southerly along West Street to the point 
of beginning, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of Olga Elia and others. 

ARTICLE 31: To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-law and Map by changing from Single 
Residence "A" District to Industrial District the following described parcel of land: Beginning at a point 
on Middlesex Avenue one hundred fifty (150') feet north of a stone bound at the north side of First Avenue, 
the line runs easterly seven hundred-six and 71/100 (706. 71') feet parallel with First Avenue to the line of 
the Boston & Maine Railroad; thence southeasterly by said Boston & Maine Railroad two thousand seven 
hundred fifty-four and 79/100 (2754. 79') feet to an iron pipe bound at Concord Street; thence northwesterly 
by said Concord Street one thousand six hundred eighty-five (1685') feet more or less to a ditch at land now 
or formerly of Frank and Marjory Stevens; thence northeasterly by said ditch and by said Stevens' land two 
hundred sixty-eight (268') feet more or less to a corner at land now or formerly of Paul and Doris Reitchel, 
Jr. , and by land now or formerly of Ernest W. and Rose M. Eames; thence easterly by said ditch and by 
land of said Reitchels' one hundred ninety-two (192') feet more or less to a corner at land of said Eames 
and at land now or formerly of Christina Lopez; thence northerly by another ditch by land or said Lopez two 
hundred fourteen 5/100 (214. 5',) feet more or less to a stake at the upland; thence northwesterly by land of 
said Lopez five hundred eighty-four and 9/'00 (584. 9') feet more or less to a corner; thence northwesterly 
by land of said Lopez one hundred sixty-five (165') feet more or less to a stake and stones; thence north- 
easterly by said Lopez land and by a line on the easterly side of Mystic Avenue six hundred thirty- seven and 
54/100 (637. 54') feet more or less to the northerly side of First Avenue; thence westerly by said First 
Avenue four hundred sixty-four and 76/100 (464. 76') feet more or less to a stone bound at Middlesex Aven ue 
thence northerly on a line of said Middlesex Avenue one hundred fifty (150') feet to the point of beginning, or 
do anything in relation thereto. Request of James A. Mackey and others. 

ARTICLE 32: To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-law changing from Single Residence A 
to Industrial, the following described parcel of land: Starting at a point on Kilmarnock Street, Wilmington, 
and running south 8932' 07" east nine hundred seventy-eight and 22/100 (978. 22) feet to an iron post; thence 
turning and running north 32° 48' 24" west eleven hundred fifty-four and 56/100 (1154. 56) feet to an iron 
post and Kilmarnock Street, and thence running along Kilmarnock Street north 84° 22' east one hundred 
seventy-six and 90/100 (176. 90) feet to an iron post, thence continuing along Kilmarnock Street north 87^41' 
east one hundred thirty-nine and 6/100 (139. 06) feet, thence continuing along Kilmarnock Street south 
81° 52' 56" east one hundred twenty-four and 40/100 (124. 40) feet to an iron post, thence continuing along 
Kilmarnock Street south 81°52' 56" east fifty-one and 17/100 (51. 17) feet to point of beginning. Said plot 
of land is shown in a plan of land filed with the Town Clerk on January 17, 1963 and known as "Land in 
Wilmington, Mass. , December 1962" and drawn by Gordon E. Ainsworth, Registered Surveyor", or do 
anything in relation thereto. Request of Edith E. Cutter and others. 

ARTICLE 33: To see if the Town will vote to rezone from "Rural" to "Single Residence A"'a strip of land 
200 feet deep on each side of Chestnut Street from the present Single Residence A District to the boundary 
line of the City of Woburn, Mass. , or do anything in relation thereto. Request of William F. Roberts and 
others. 

ARTICLE 34: To see if the Town will authorize the Board of Selectmen to purchase or to take by Eminent 
Domain the strip of land ten feet in width adjoining the westerly sideline of Ballardvale Street from the 
northerly line of the Cowie property to the intersection of Ballardvale Street and Route 125 as described 
in the map approved by the Planning Board and on file with the Town Clerk for the purpose of constructing 
a sidewalk; and further to see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose 
of acquiring said land or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. 

129 



Town Accountant 



ANALYSIS OF THE CASH ACCOUNT - for the year ending December 31, 1962 

RECEIPTS FOR THE YEAR 1962 

Balance as at January 1, 1962 

Add; Cash Receipts January 1 through December 31, 1962 

Deduct: Cash Expenditures during 1962 
Balance on Hand as at December 31, 1962 

ANALYSIS OF CASH RECEIVED 





882, 157. 


86 


4, 


819, 443. 


98 


5, 


701, 601. 


84 


5, 


332, 196. 


27 




369, 405. 


57 



« 

u 



"J 

,0 

i 



I 

ir 



Tax Collections: 

Prior Years' Levy: Poll 

Personal Property 
Real Estate 
Current Levy: Poll 

Personal Property 
Real Estate 
Betterments Added to Taxes: 

Prior years: Water Assessments 

Street Assessments 
Current Levy: Water Assessments 

Street Assessments 
Unapportioned Water & Street Assessments 
Apportioned Assessments Paid in Advance : 

Water 
Street 

Water Liens added to Taxes: 

Prior levies 
Current levy 

Tax Titles Redeemed 



TAXES 

144. 00 

4, 615. 07 
66, 244. 83 

5, 962. 00 
50, 657. 73 

1,718, 082. 1 1 

1, 090. 54 
270. 65 
5, 654. 44 
1, 250. 33 



1, 179. 98 
5, 321. 93 



AMOUNTS BORROWED 

Short Term: 

To pay expenditures of Town Depts. until 

taxes are collected 1 , 000, 000. 00 

To carry on Chapter 81 & Chapter 91 contract 
work until State & County reimbursements 
are received 47,575.00 

Temporary Loans /Anticipation of Bond Issues 150, 000. 00 



71, 003. 90 



1, 774, 701. 84 



1, 361. 19 

6, 904. 77 
12, 679. 52 

3, 504. 57 
1, 338. 78 



6, 501. 91 
16, 284. 81 



1, 894, 281. 29 



1, 197, 575. 00 



Long Term: 

Proceeds from Sale of Bonds 



194, 175. 00 



1, 391, 750. 00 



130 



GRANTS AND GIFTS 



Federal Grants: 
Charitie s: 



Aid to Dependent Children, Aid 

Aid to Dependent Children, Administration 

Old Age Assistance, Assistance 

Old Age Assistance, Administration 

Medical Assistance Aged, Aid 

Medical Assistance Aged, Administration 

Disability Assistance, Assistance 

Disability Assistance, Administration 

Schools: 

Public Law #874 

National Defense Education Act 85/864 
Public Grants: 

Construction Grants -in- Aid (Highways) 
Comm. of Mass. - Chapter 81 & 90 
Middlesex County Treasurer - Chapter 90 



23, 084. 


66 


2, 450. 


87 


41, 046. 


20 


3, 107. 


36 


25, 888. 


92 


1, 728. 


49 


4, 167. 


90 


489. 


83 


25, 124. 00 


8, 219. 


95 



25, 535. 53 
44, 153. 56 
27, 617. 41 
4, 657. 73 

33, 343. 95 



41, 997. 38 
12, 643. 36 



189, 948. 92 



AGENCY AND TRUST FUNDS 



Federal Withholding Tax Deductions 


214, 349. 


03 


State Withholding Tax Deductions 


17, 772. 


91 


Retirement System Deductions 


31, 802. 


09 


Blue Cross/Blue Shield Deductions 


15, 689. 


14 


Group Life Insurance Deductions 


3, 820. 


66 


U. S. Savings Bonds Deductions 


487. 


50 


Fish & Game Licenses Collected for Dept. of Conservation 


2, 567. 


50 


Dog Licenses, Collected for Middlesex County Dog Officer 


2, 868. 


00 


Cemetery Trust Funds 


675. 


00 


Carter Lecture Fund, Repayments to Treasury 


1, 346. 


00 



291, 377. 83 



RECEIPTS AVAILABLE FOR APPROPRIATION - NOT APPROPRIATED 

Repayments to Petty Cash Advances 15. 00 

Water Guaranteed Deposits 29, 518. 04 

Sewer Guaranteed Deposits 677. 50 

Recoveries, O. A. A. Lien Law 4,793.12 

Premium, Sale of Bonds 749. 52 

Water Available Surplus /Sale of Obsolete Equipment 1. 00 

Prior Years' Refunds to Surplus Revenue 1, 602. 76 

Refunds to Appropriations 1962 6,251.64 
Water Department: 

Rates 148, 106. 29 

Water Services 5, 343. 97 153,450.26 

Sewer Rentals 13, 512. 00 210,570.84 

RECEIPTS RESERVED FOR APPROPRIATION ■ RESTRICTED USES 

Sale of Cemetery Lots Fund 4, 235. 00 

Sale of Real Estate Fund 103. 40 4, 338. 40 

REVOLVING FUNDS 

School Lunch Program Receipts 1 16, 750. 21 

High School Athletic Association Receipts 8, 146. 60 124,896.81 



131 



ESTIMATED RECEIPTS 



Income Taxes: 

Schools G/L Chapter 70 

Town's Allocation 
Corporation Taxes 

Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes Collected: 

Prior Years' Levies 

Current Year 
Farm Animal Excise Taxes: 

Prior Years' Levies 

Current Year 
Loss of Taxes, State Treasurer 
Licenses, Liquor 
Meal Taxes, State Treasurer 
Interests and Costs: 

Tax Titles Redeemed 

Tax Collections 
General Government: 

Selectmen's Receipts 

Town Collector's Receipts 

Town Clerk's Receipts 

Planning Board Receipts 
Protection of Persons & Property: 

Police Department Receipts 

Building Inspector: 
Building Permits 
Wire Permits 
Plumbing Permits 
Gas Fitting Permits 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 
Public Works: 

Town Engineer 

Highway Receipts 

Cemetery Department Receipts 
Board of Health: 

Public Nurse Receipts 

Health & Sanitation Receipts 

Dog Immunization Clinic 
Charities & Soldier's Benefits 

General Relief A/R 

General Relief Recoveries 

Aid to Dependent Children A/R 

Old Age Assistance A/R 

Medical Assistance for Aged A/R 

Disability Assistance A/R 

Veterans Benefits 

Rent of Quarters/Welfare Dept. 

Charities Administration Reimbursement 
Schools and Libraries: 

Adult Evening School Receipts 

School Construction Reimbursements 

Miscellaneous High School Receipts 

Vocational Education Reimbursement 

Division of Child Guardianship 

Library Fines 

State Aid to Libraries 



1, 221. 00 
2, 131. 45 
1,016. 50 
29. 00 



1, 807. 35 
945. 00 
10, 497. 05 
20, 099. 57 
17, 447. 78 
6, 312. 86 
18, 641. 80 
604. 27 
3, 796. 68 

2, 164. 40 
113,274.41 
960. 07 
3, 784. 83 
16, 480. 86 
1, 199. 67 
3, 118. 75 



181, 773. 54 
6, 700. 00 



43, 640. 92 
195, 917. 61 



73 


44 


293 


29 


1, 623 


87 


5, 580 


34 


295. 


50 


1 , 180. 


50 


3, 09 1. 


73 


90. 


00 


242. 


75 


4, 397. 


95 


175. 


30 


97. 


00 


984. 


38 


3, 366. 


00 


203. 


00 


1, 209. 


97 


410. 


75 



188, 473. 54 
26, 130. 00 



239, 558. 53 



366. 73 
70. 52 
4, 000. 00 
3, 878. 00 



7, 204. 21 



4, 657. 73 



4, 816. 00 



4, 447. 38 



1, 823. 72 



80, 152. 36 



136, 664. 57 
4, 318. 42 



140,982. 99 



132 



ESTIMATED RECEIPTS 



Miscellaneous Receipts: 

Insurance Reimbursements 

N. E. Tel & Tel Commissions 

4th District Court Fines 

Dog License Reimbursements, County 

Legal Settlements, Court Case 

Employer's Compensation, State Withholding Tax 
Sale of Obsolete Equipment 



1, 498. 40 
124. 41 
565. 00 
2, 420. 51 
1 , 000. 00 
108. 86 
1 . 00 



5, 718. 18 



TOTAL RECEIPTS FOR YEAR ENDING 12/31/62 



4, 819, 443. 95 



ANALYSIS OF FEDERAL GRANTS 



Charitie s: 



Aid to Dependent Children, Aid 


7,715. 


76 


23, 084. 


66 


17, 676. 


28 


13, 124. 


14 


Aid to Dependent Children, Admin. 


768. 


09 


2, 450. 


87 


2, 096. 


49 


1, 122. 


47 




8, 483. 


85 


25, 535. 


53 


19, 772. 


77 


14, 246. 


61 


Old Age Assistance, Assistance 


6, 800. 


76 


#41,830. 


57 


37, 012. 


15 


11,619. 


18 


Old Age Assistance, Administration 


3,215. 


05 


3, 107. 


36 


5, 481. 


68 


840. 


73 




10, 015. 


81 


44, 937. 


93 


42, 493. 


83 


12, 459. 


91 


Disability Assistance, Assistance 


574. 


74 


4, 167. 


90 


4, 425. 


37 


317. 


27 


Disability Assistance, Administration 


125. 


64 


489. 


83 


285. 


70 


329. 


77 




700. 


38 


4, 557. 


73 


4, 71 1. 


07 


647. 


04 


Medical Assistance for Aged, Assist. 


12, 189. 


81 


25, 888. 


92 


28, 280. 


61 


9, 798. 


12 


Medical Assistance for Aged, Admin. 


264. 


77 


1, 728. 


49 


1, 427. 


40 


565. 


86 




12, 454. 


58 


27, 617. 


41 


29, 708. 


01 


10, 363. 


98 


*Includes transfer of $784. 37 from Recoveries 


> Account 














Schools: 


















Special Account P/L #874 


5, 261. 


49 


25, 124. 


00 


11, 308. 


19 


19, 077. 


30 


National Defense Education Act 


















P/L 85-864 


62. 


06 


8,219. 


95 


4, 608. 


05 


3, 673. 


96 




5, 323. 


55 


33, 343. 


95 


15, 916. 


24 


22, 751. 


26 




DISBURSEMENTS FROM GENERAL ACCOUNTS 
ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES OTHER THAN THAT RAISED FROM 
APPROPRIATION FOR THE YEAR ENDING 12/31/62 



Refunds: 
T axe s 

Prior Years 
Current Levy 
Poll 

Personal Property 
Real Estate 
Motor Vehicle Excise Tax 

Prior Years 

Current Levy 
Assessments Added to Taxes 

Water Betterments 

Street Betterments 
Water Department 

Water Rates 

Water Liens, Added to Taxes 

Water Guaranteed Deposits 

Sewer Guaranteed Deposits 
Interest & Costs 
Sale of Cemetery Lots 
Cemetery Receipts 
State & County Assessments: 

County Hospital Assessments 
County Tax Assessments 
County Retirement Assessment 
State Audit Assessment 
State Parks & Reservations 
M. D. C. Sewer Charges 
Agency & Trust Funds: 
Carter Lecture Fund 
Blue Cross-Blue Shield 
Group Life Insurance Deductions 
U. S. Savings Bonds 
Withholding Taxes, Federal 
Withholding Taxes, State 
Retirement Deductions 

Fish & Game Licenses Due Commonwealth 
Dog Licenses Due County 
Cemetery Trust Funds 
Town Functions (Not Appropriated): 
School Lunch Program 
High School Athletic Association 
Water Department: 

Maintenance & Operation 

Water Betterments 1962 

Chestnut Street Wellfield 
Street Betterments 1962 

Additions & Alterations Jr/Sr. High School 

High School Athletic Field Construction 

Glen Road School Construction 

Boutwell Street School Construction 

North Intermediate School Construction 

Legal Settlements 

Premium Sale of Bonds (Interest) 



1 , 194. 90 

12. 00 
136. 28 
4, 925. 15 



107, 619. 95 
67, 851. 37 
44, 732. 18 



6, 268. 33 



2, 780. 


64 




* . 




7, 694. 


44 


10, 475 


08 




41. 


78 








179. 


45 


221. 


23 




88. 


84 








47. 


45 








5, 841. 


10 








77. 


57 


6, 054. 


96 








19. 


19 








100. 


00 








30. 


00 




5, 758. 


32 








19, 838. 


41 








34, 127. 


75 


59, 724. 


48 




1, 763. 


38 








4, 752. 84 








34, 813. 


76 


41, 329. 


98 





200. 00 
15, 689. 14 
' 4,777.21 
487. 50 
214, 349. 03 
IT, 111. 91 
31, 802. 09 
2, 567. 50 
2, 685. 25 
675. 00 

116, 732. 57 
5, 635. 09 



220, 203. 50 
27, 694. 44 
7, 150. 44 
48. 00 
400. 00 
16, 855. 78 
426, 461. 38 
1 , 200. 00 
749. 52 



23, 168. 79 



392, 060. OS 



823, 130. 7i 



134 



Federal Grants & Aid: 
P. L. 85/864 (Schools) 
P. L. 874 (Schools) 
Aid to Dependent Children, Aid 
Aid to Dependent Children, Administration 
Old Age Assistance, Assistance 
Old Age Assistance, Administration 
Medical Assistance for Aged, Assistance 
Medical Assistance for Aged, Administration 
Disability Assistance, Assistance 
Disability Assistance, Administration 



4, 608. 


05 


11, 308. 


19 


17, 676. 


28 


1, 934. 


78 


35, 614. 57 


5, 481. 


68 


28, 280. 


61 


1, 427. 


40 


4, 425. 


37 


285. 


70 



15, 916. 24 
19, 61 1. 06 
41, 096. 25 
29, 708. 01 
4, 71 1. 07 



111, 042. 63 



Temporary Loans : 

Anticipation of Revenue Taxes 
Anticipation of Serial Issue/Bonds 
Anticipation of Highway Reimbursement 



1, 000, 000. 00 
150, 000. 00 
63, 325. 00 



1,213, 325. 00 



TOTAL DISBURSEMENTS FROM GENERAL ACCOUNTS 



2, 562, 727. 23 



TRUST FUND ACCOUNTS - Year Ending 12/31/62 



On Hand 
as at 
1/1/62 



Trusts 
Added 
1962 



Intere st 
Received 
1962 



With- 
drawals 
1962 



Balance 
on Hand 
12/31/62 



Cemetery Trust Funds 

Woburn Five Cent Savings Bank 564. 27 

Andover Savings Bank 2,726. 33 

Mechanics Savings Bank 20,325.94 



675. 00 



22. 68 
109. 86 
793. 25 



586. 95 
2, 836. 19 
21, 794. 19 



S. D. J. Carter Lecture Fund 

Woburn Five Cent Savings Bank 
Mechanics Savings Bank 



2, 922. 1 1 
5, 419. 77 



87. 90 
212. 03 



746. 00 
600. 00 



2, 264. 01 
5, 031. 80 



Burnap Library Fund 
Andover Savings Bank 



288. 52 



1 1. 64 



300. 16 



Benjamin Buck Library Fund 
Andover Savings Bank 



719. 41 



29. 04 



748. 45 



Charlotte C. Smith Library Fund 
Mechanics Savings Bank 



796. 47 



31. 15 



827. 62 



Sears Cook Walker -Walker 
School Library Fund 

Mechanics Savings Bank 

Chester W. Clark Library Fund 
Mechanics Savings Bank 



314. 66 



1, 065. 23 



12. 29 



41. 67 



326. 95 



1, 106. 90 



Sabra Carter Common Fund 
Andover Savings Bank 



303. 88 



12. 24 



316. 12 



East Wilmington Improvement 
Association Library Fund 
Mechanics Savings Bank 



3, 954. 86 



39, 401. 45 



154. 72 



675. 00 



1,518. 47 



1, 346. 00 



135 



4, 109. 58 



40, 248. 92 




ANALYSIS OF THE MATURING DEBT 





1— S H j *~\ *-» /-» ^"v o 

Ddidncc o 


Arirlorl 
/\QUC U 




Balance s 


1 IN Ol J— ' J— ' LJ l—i l—> J. J— i J. 1VI1 J. . 


1 / 1 / A? 

1 / 1 / 


1 Q A? 


1 Q A? 
1 7 Oil 


19 / 1 1 / A? 


Hi ah ^rVinril T r»an Art ^7 1 / 47 










<fc?A5 noo oo 

4>L U J , UUU. U U 


i nn noo 




l ^ 000 

1 J, uuu 


ft ^ nnn 
D , uuu 


HjltriTl. OCUOOl ij(JdIl, VV llUWOOU OLllUOl 










C/l AA Q^r- 10 <fcM? 000 00 
\j[ I J—i *±*t Oct,. 1U f J 16, uUv. UU 


^00 000 
J u u , uuu 




7 c nno 
ti , uuu 


97c nnn 
l. 1 D , uuu 


Fire / Police St at i on Lodii 










P,/T AA c;^r 10 <fcA0 000 00 


? 000 

£■ U , UUU 




^ 000 

D, UUU 


1 ^ nnn 
ID, uuu 


piiki j /- Qp u; p r y a i n c Pt/T 44 ^l^r 10 

r^UUllC O C W C I I VI dills W / J-i *T *1 JCL. 1 U 










$106, 000. 00 


61, 000 




15, 000 


46, 000 


Street Construction Bonds (1958) 










n / T A4 10 <fc Ao ooo oo 






k nnn 

D, UUU 


7, A nnn 

jO, UUU 


Street Construction Bonds ( I960) 










r* f 1 AA Qa<~ 10 <fc 1 000 00 
1 44 OcC, 1U J) * J » UUU. UU 


o, uuu 




^ nnn 
3 , uuu 


7. nnn 
j, uuu 


Street Construction Bonds (36Z) 










n/T 44 Qor 10 <t^Q 7CK1 oo 
\j f ±-i 4 4 Dec. 1U $ J7, I jU, UU 




J7, 1 JU 




7Q 7 C fV 

J 7 , 1 DU 


r^uuiic w orKs rjiag. &c r^oiice otation 










r+ / t C«r 10 <t 1 AO 000 OO 

Donas, 44 oec. iu $ ItU, uuu. uu 


ii? nnn 

l 1 L. , UUU 




1 4. nnn 
It, uuu 


q ft nnn 
7 1 uuu 




Aa^ nnn 

Mj , UUU 


7 £n 

J7 , ( DU 


oc nnn 
85, UUU 


-?7 f , f ->U 


PiT tt ct p\ TT F)TT "R T T T\/fTT* 










T-Iir/Vi °;rV»r»r>l T r»ai-i Arte \7 1 /47 

nign ocnooi LOdn ^cis j& i / 4 i 










<t?oo ooo oo 

4>lUU, UUU. UU 


on nnn 

7 U , UUU 




1 n nnn 
I u , uuu 


ftO 000 
OU, UUU 


Aua. &/\iter. jr/or nign ocnooi 










A„f AAc; /Aft <t 1 17c OOO 00 


ncc nnn 

7 D D , UUU 




an nnn 
oU , uuu 


07c nnn 

/ D , UUU 


naa. oc/Mter. jr / or nign ocnooi 










Ai"*-c> AaiW Aft <t AOO 000 00 

/\CtS DTj/'io ilp'iUU, UUU. UU 


7.Ap\ nnn 

JtU , uuu 




7 n nnn 

£U , UUU 


o?p| nno 
u , uuu 


r,1 « T?/-\orl QrVir*r»l Rnn r\ c Arte AAR/Aft 










<t450 000 00 


375 000 




25 000 


350 000 

J — ' U f uuu 


Douiwcii oirtJci ocnooi xjoiicio 










A-t c A A c; / aq <t AOO OOO OO 
ACtS D/ 40 4>4UU, UUU. UU 


•j 7 c nnn 
J ( -5 , uuu 




? c nnn 

£ D , UUU 


Qcn 000 

jjU, UUU 


in or tn line r me ui ai e ocnuui Dunub 










A-f e AAtW Aft <fc 1 0^0 OOO OO 
ACt S 04D / 4o $ 1 , U jU, UUU. UU 


l n^n nnn 

1 , UjU, uuu 




Lr\ nnn 
ou , uuu 


QQO OOO 
77U, UUU 


School Projects Loans (56Z) 










A4^ /4ft <fcAft 4? ^ OO 




DO , *±Lt D 




Aft 4? R 


w ater Donas , iNew weimeia 










f U an AA Qor ft <tA0 000 00 
Lindp. *r*r OCC. O 4>OU, UUU. UU 


7 ^ nnn 

£. D , UUU 




r nnn 

_3 , UUU 


?0 000 
t. u , uuu 


Water Meters, Improving Exist. 










oy stem oc x^ette rment s, unap 










q <t 1 ar nnn nn 
oec. o ^pi^*-** uuu. uu 


71 nnn 
( 1 , uuu 




ft nnn 
, uuu 


A"* 000 
Oj, UUU 


Water Standpipe Bonds, Chap 44 










oec. o ^)1d^,UUU.UU 


nn nnn 
1 c. U , UUU 




1 n nnn 
1 u , uuu 


iin nnn 
1 1 u , uuu 


Water Main oonds \ lyDi) 










r*»u__ a a q <t^c nnn nn 
Unap 44 oec o ^j^^ uuu. uu 


9 n nnn 
£U ,uuu 




Cl nnn 

D , UUU 


1 1\ noo 

ID, UUU 


Water Main Bonds ( 19->o) 










Chap 44 Sec 8 $50,000.00 


38, 000 




4, 000 


34, 000 


Water Main Bonds (361) 










Chan 44 Ser 8 $5 000 00 


5, 000 




2, 000 


3, 000 


Water Main Bonds (661) 










Chap 44 Sec 8 $7,200.00 


7, 200 




2, 400 


4, 800 


Water Bonds New Wellfield (361) 










Chap 44 Sec 8 $90,000.00 


90, 000 




10, 000 


80, 000 


Water Main Bonds (3/5/62) Chap 44 










Sec 8 $86, 000. 00 




86, 000 




86, 000 




3, 561, 200 


154, 425 


266, 400 


3, 449, 225 


COMBINED TOTALS 


4, 204, 200 


194, 175 


351, 400 


4, 046, 975 



136 



COMPARISON OF ESTIMATED RECEIPTS 
USED BY THE ASSESSORS IN SETTING THE 1962 TAX RATE 
WITH THE ACTUAL RECEIPTS OF THE YEAR 12/31/62 



Used by the Actual Receipts Receipts 

Assessors on 1962 more than less than 

the 1962 Rate Receipts E stimated Estimated 



Income Taxes 


183, 605. 


1 1 


188, 473. 


54 


4, 868. 


43 






Corporation Taxes 


22, 105. 


78 


26, 130. 


00 


4, 024. 


22 






Reimbursement Publicly Owned Land 


70. 


52 


70. 


52 










Old Age Meal Tax 


3, 623. 


78 


3, 878. 


00 


254. 


22 






Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes 


210, 202. 


00 


229, 080. 


15 


18, 878. 


15 






License s 


4, 000. 


00 


4, 000. 


00 










Special Assessments 


2, 386. 


00 


14, 972. 


51 


12, 586. 


51 






General Government 


4, 735. 


00 


4, 579. 


73 






155. 


27 


Protection Persons & Property 


3, 981. 


00 


4, 816. 


00 


835. 


00 






Health & Sanitation 


2, 223. 


00 


1, 823. 


72 






399. 


28 


Charities (Other than Grants) 


37, 255. 


00 


40, 475. 


44 


3, 220. 


44 






Old Age Assistance (Other than Grants) 


21, 255. 


00 


20, 099. 


57 






1, 155. 


43 


Veterans Services 


20, 494. 


OC 


18, 641. 


80 






1, 852. 


20 


Schools (Income Tax excluded) 


45, 594. 


00 


23, 390. 


16 






22, 203. 


84 


Libraries 


589. 


25 


4, 318. 


42 


3, 729. 


17 






Cemeterie s 


4, 133. 


00 


3, 336. 


00 






797. 


00 


Interests 


6, 540. 


00 


7, 185. 


02 


645. 


02 






School Construction Reimbursement (State) 


113, 274. 


41 


113, 274. 


41 










Farm Animal Excise Tax 


263. 


00 


366. 


73 


103. 


73 






Sewer Rentals 


14, 014. 


00 


13, 512. 


00 






502. 


00 


Unclassified 


2, 121. 


00 


1, 879. 


65 






241. 


35 


Insurance Claim Reimbursement 






1, 498. 


40 


1, 498. 


40 






Legal Settlements /Court Case 






1, 000. 


00 


1, 000. 


00 






TOT ALS 


702, 464. 


85 


726, 801. 


77 


51, 643. 


29 


27, 306. 


37 



SCHEDULE OF SHORT TERM LOANS 

Balance Added Paid off Balances 

as at during during as at 

1/1/62 1962 1962 12/31/62 



Temporary Loans in Anticipation of 

Tax Collections 1,000,000.00 1,000,000.00 

Temporary Loans in Anticipation of 

Reimbursement (Highways) 63,325.00 47,575.00 63,325.00 47,575.00 

Temporary Loans in Anticipation of 

Serial Issues/Bonds 150, 000. 00 150, 000. 00 

TOTALS 63,325.00 1,197,575.00 1,213, 325. 00 47, 575. 00 



137 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
BALANCE SHEET - DECEMBER 31, 1962 



ASSETS 



Cash Account 
Petty Cash Advances 
Taxes Uncollected: 
Prior Levies: 



Poll 



Personal Property 



Real Estate 



Motor Vehicle Excise 



Current Levies: 



1958 
1959 
1960 
1961 
1958 
1959 
1960 
1961 
1956 
1960 
1961 
1957 
1958 
1959 
I960 
1961 



Poll Tax 

Personal Property Tax 
Real Estate Tax 
Motor Vehicle Excise T 
Farm Animal Excise Levy 



ax 

I960 

1961 



Betterment Assessments Added to Taxes: 
Prior Levies: 



Water Assessment 
Commit. Int. -Water 



1961 
1960 
1961 
1961 



20. 00 
30. 00 
72. 00 
116. 00 
16. 50 
41. 60 
598. 40 
765. 91 
69. 90 
9. 34 
19, 662. 47 
165. 59 
217. 31 
922. 38 
1, 607. 35 
346. 18 



16. 28 
30. 39 
139. 25 



Commit. Int. -Street 

Current Levies: 

Water Assessments 624. 64 

Street Assessments 64.49 
Committed Water Interest 404. 98 

Committed Street Interest 41. 24 

Water Liens Added to Taxes: 
Levy 1961 
Current 

Tax Titles 

Tax Title Possessions 
Unapportioned Assessments: Water 
Street 

Water Department: 

Water Rates 

Water Services 
Charities & Soldier's Benefits A/R 

General Relief 

Aid to Dependent Children 

Old Age Assistance 

Soldier's Benefits 
State li County Aid to Highways A/R 

County Aid 

State Aid 

Unprovided for Account s /Overdraft s 

Overlay Levy 1958 15.20 

1959 200.80 

1960 88. 40 

Legal Settlements Paid 
Underestimate Cherry Sheet Items 

County Hospital Assessment 1962 

Overestimate used in excess 
County Tax (1961) 

M. D. C. Sewer Assessments (1961) 
Appropriation Overdrafts - 1962 
Fire Department Salaries 
Chapter 91 Construction 1961 
Snow &t Ice Removal 
Veteran's Aid 
Loans Authorized 



238. 00 

1, 422. 41 
19, 741. 71 

3,258.81 



185. 92 
. 02 



1, 135. 35 



264 


71 


1, 355 


84 


46, 304 


27 


20, 353 


33 


20, 247 


76 


64, 858 


72 


30, 377 


59 


868 


12 


1. 546 


71 


3.913 


99 


72 


82 


9. 343 


44 


12, 308 


32 


39, 312 


23 


304 


40 


1, 200 


oo 


784 


69 


1, 234 


20 


816. 


39 


2. 175 


36 




38 


15, 076. 


24 


15, 000 


00 



369, 405. 57 
270. 00 





260 


00 






2 


324. 


43 






83 


764 


87 






2 1 


036 


69 


132. 046 


92 




23 


63 








6. 


25 


29 


88 



1, 321. 29 

1 . 620. 55 

66, 657. 60 
85. 106. 48 

31. 245. 71 

14, 876. 96 
51, 620. 55 



36, 591. 66 
88, 066. 00 



TOTAL ASSETS 



$ 878, 859. 17 



138 




TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
BALANCE SHEET - DECEMBER 31, 1962 

LIABILITIES & RESERVES 



Temporary Loans/Anticipation of Reimbursement 

School Lunch Program 

High School Athletic Association 

Federal Grants /Schools: 

George Barden Fund 

Public Law #85-864 

Public Law #874 
Federal Grant s /Charitie s: 



47, 575. 00 
3, 006. 46 
5, 854. 44 



Aid to Dependent Children: 
Old Age Assistance: 



137 


00 


3, 673. 


96 


19, 077. 


30 


13, 124. 


14 


1, 122. 


47 


11, 619. 


18 


840 


7? 


9, 798 


12 


565 


86 


317 


27 


329 


77 



Aid 

Admin. 
Assist. 
Admin. 

Medical Assistance for Aged 

Admin. 

Disability Assistance . Assist. 

Admin. 

Recoveries - Old Age Assistance Accounts 
Agency Accounts: 

Group Life Insurance Deductions 

Water Guaranteed Deposits 

Dog Licenses Due County 
Road Machinery Account Fund 
Sale of Real Estate Fund 
Sale of Cemetery Lots Fund 
Overlay Accounts: 

Levy 1961 

Levy 1962 

Reserve Fund - Overlay Surplus 
Tax Possessions - Duplicate Sales 
Redemption of Assigned Tax Titles 
Tailings - Unclaimed Checks 
Reserve for Petty Cash Advances 
Reserved Until Collected - Revenues: 

Departmental - Charities & Soldier's Benefits 

Motor Vehicle Excise 

Water Department 

Special Assessments - Betterments 
Tax Titles 8t Tax Possessions 
Farm Animal Excise 
Overestimated - State & County Assessments: 
County Tax 1962 
State Audit 1962 



State Parks & Reservations 1961 




378. 


48 


1962 




456. 


42 


M. D. C. Sewer Assessment 1962 








Appropriation Accounts - Non Revenue 








Street Betterments 1962 


9, 


322. 


92 


Water Betterments 196) 


6, 


239. 


31 


1962 


15, 


685. 


84 


Water Development - Chestnut St. 








Wellfield 


28, 


755. 


81 


Water Improv. -Barrows Wellfield 


3, 


326. 


82 


Boutwell St. School Construction 


6, 


365. 


90 


High School Athletic Field Const. 




944. 


54 


Glen Road School Construction 




488. 


4b 


Wildwood School Construction 


2, 


999 


55 


North Intermediate School Const. 


35, 


276 


26 


Municipal Garage Construction 




318 


73 


Construct Fire/Police Station 




260 


18 


Construct New Police Station 




54 


83 



Appropriation Accounts - Revenue, Gener 
Encumberances carried to 1963 
Civil Defense 

Chapter 90 Construction 1962 
Relocate Boutwell Street 
Hobson Avenue Drainage 
Reconstruct Ballardvale Street 
Chap. 91 Ipswich River Drainage 
Perm. Bldg. Comm. Engineering Serv. 
Purchase of Land & Bldgs. & Alter. 
(New Library Building) 

Water Available Surplus 

Surplus Revenue 

Loans Authorized & Unissued 



1: 
1, 


284 


59 


2, 


493. 


05 


32, 


550 


00 


4 


245. 


86 


6 


689 


57 


2 


775. 


42 


20 


000 


00 


7 


880 


00 


to 


000 


00 



22, 888. 26 

14, 246. 61 
12, 459. 9 1 
10, 363. 98 
647. 04 



919. 96 
1, 792. 77 
243. 25 



175. 78 
1 1, 907. 67 
32. 02 



14, 876. 96 
24, 295. 50 
32, 866. 26 
86, 427. 77 
66, 657. 60 
29. 88 

131. 42 
855. 72 

834. 90 
4, 650. 96 



110,039. 15 



107, 918. 49 



60, 605. 80 
4, 793. 12 



2, 955. 98 
180. 25 
103. 40 

4, 135. 00 



12, 1 15. 47 
201. 74 
51.81 
514. 94 
270. 00 



225, 153. 97 



6, 473. 00 



217, 957. 64 
75, 461. 60 

123, 383. 55 
88. 066. 00 



TOTAL LIABILITIES & RESERVES 



878, 859. 17 



139 



REPORT OF EXPENDITURES DURING 1962 FROM APPROPRIATIONS 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT: 



>> 
i_ 

(0. 

L. 

,0 

id 



Selectmen, Board of: 
Salary, Clerk 

Rent & Town Meeting Expenses 
Dues & Subscriptions 
Printing Advertising 
Legal Fees 
Travel Expenses 
Supplies, Office 

Elections: 



Wages, Election Worker s 
Printing 

Meals, Election Worker s 
Supplies, Departmental 

Registrar of Voters: 
Salaries, Registrars 
Salary, Clerk 
Services, Clerical 
Printing 

Services, Census 
Supplies, Office 

Finance Committee: 
Services, Clerical 
Printing 
Advertising 
Postage 

Town Manager: 
Salary, Administrative 
Salary, Secretary 
Dues & Subscriptions 
Printing 8* Advertising 
Travel Allowance 
Repairs, Office Equipment 
Supplies, Office 
Supplies, Library 

Industrial Account: 
Dues & Subscriptions 
Printing 
Adverti sing 
Travel Allowance 
Supplies, Office 

Town Accountant: 



Salary, Administrative 
Salary, Clerical 
Dues & Subscriptions 
Travel Allowance 
Supplies, Office 



700. 
122. 
324. 
209. 
381. 
250. 
20. 



2, 008. 

1, 835. 
168. 
118. 
286. 



2, 408. 

600. 
200. 

98. 
712. 
1, 322. 
10. 



2, 943. 

107. 
264. 

12. 
122. 



506. 

11, 499. 
4, 860. 
53. 
12. 
300. 

39. 
364. 
47. 
17, 176. 

16. 

28. 
153. 
195. 

12. 



406. 



00 
40 
50 
75 
90 
00 
13 
68 

08 
00 
99 
70 
77 

00 
00 
25 
84 
20 
15 
44 

50 
00 
50 
30 
30 

80 
00 
25 
50 
00 
50 
24 
00 
29 

00 
98 
10 
82 
50 
40 



6, 500. 
1, 477. 
7. 
25. 
438. 



00 
60 
00 
00 
20 

8. 447. 80 



Town Treasurer: 
Salary, Administrative 
Salary, Clerical 
Due s 

Legal Fees 
Recording Fees 
Repairs, Office Equipment 
Supplies, Office 

Town Collector: 



Salary, Administrative 
Deputy Coll. /Clerk Salary 
Services Deputy Collector 
Binding 
Advertising 

Deputy Coll. /Clerk Bond 

Recording Fees 

Dues 

Repairs , Office Equipment 
Supplies, Office 

Town Clerk: 



Salary, Administrative 

Dues 

Binding 

Supplies, Office 

Outlay, Office Equipment 

Assessors: 



Salary, Administrative 
Salaries, Office 
Dues & Subscriptions 
Binding 

Recording Fees 
Travel Allowances 
Supplies, Office 

Town Counsel: 



Retainer 
Legal Fees 

Recording Fees & Costs 

Planning Board: 
Salary, Clerical 
Due s 
Printing 
Advertising 
Recording Fees 
Supplies, Office 
Street Signs 



5, 200. 00 
128. 00 
8. 00 

50. 48 
33. 60 

51. 54 
918. 05 

6, 389. 67 

5, 200. 00 
3, 640. 00 
100. 00 
28. 00 
84. 00 
48. 00 
169. 60 
8. 00 
15. 25 
1, 154. 33 
10, 447. 18 

5, 200. 00 
12. 50 

39. 00 
176. 08 
181. 50 

5, 609. 08 

5, 980. 00 

6, 240. 00 

60. 00 
28. 00 
232. 31 
615. 84 
557. 40 
13, 713. 55 

2, 000. 00 
I, 000. 00 
500. 00 
3, 500. 00 

221. 39 

40. 00 
93. 00 

124. 25 
11. 12 
96. 33 
192. 75 
778. 84 



140 



REPORT OF EXPENDITURES DURING 1962 FROM APPROPRIATIONS 



Town Hall: 



Salaries, Office 


5, 735 


03 


Salaries, Janitor 


1, 900 


00 


Postage 


2, 092 


44 


Electricity 


694 


85 


Telephone 


1,917 


84 


W ater 




UU 


Repairs, Office Equipment 


667 


08 


Repairs, Building 


193 


49 


Supplies, Janitor 


99 


53 


Fuel 


355 


49 


Supplies, Plant 


298 


25 


Supplies, Office 


938 


10 


Outlay, Equipment 


7, 598 


68 


Outlay, Major Repairs 


1, 229. 


00 




23, 743. 


78 


PROTECTION OF PERSONS & PROPERTY: 




Police Department: 






Salary, Administrative 


7, 020. 


00 


Salary, Sergeants 


27, 820. 


00 


Salary, Patrolmen 


64, 225. 


00 


Salary, Extra Detail & Sick Leave 


5, 547. 


10 


Salary, Clerk 


1, 560. 


00 


Salary, Policewomen 


7, 250. 


00 


Salary, Matrons 


90. 


00 


Salary, Vacation & Paid Holidays 


7, 468. 


40 




120, 980. 


50 


Dues &c Subscriptions 


18. 


00 


Postage 


55. 


00 


Travel Allowance 


600. 


00 


Prisoner Feeding & Meals 


21. 


72 


Repairs, Radios 


466. 


33 


Repairs, Clothes & Linen 


25. 


70 


Repairs, Cruisers 


966. 


91 


Supplies, Office 


224. 


27 


Supplies, Library 


23. 


1 1 


Supplies, Uniforms 


1, 543. 


20 


Supplies, Rubberwear 


18. 


50 


Supplies, Department 


490. 


38 


Gasoline & Oil 


3, 533. 


34 


Tires &c Tubes 


423. 


61 


Ammunition 


154. 


17 


Flashlights & Batteries 


32. 


59 


Equip New Police Station 


140. 


19 


Outlay, Radios & Teletype 


259. 


33 


Outlay, New Cruisers 


5, 590. 


61 




14, 586. 


96 


Police Station: 






Janitor Services 


936. 


00 


Electricity 


542. 


60 


Telephone 


1, 320. 


86 


Water 


41. 


16 



Police Station (continued): 



Repairs, Building 


34. 49 


Supplies, Janitor 


356. 78 


Supplies, Fuel 


399. 08 


Supplies, Plant 


284. 06 


Grounds & Station 


836. 85 




4, 751. 88 


Fire Department: 




Salary, Administrative 


7, 020. 00 


Salary, ILieut. 


16, 804. 00 


Salary, Firemen 


65, 985. 00 


Salary, Sick Leave & Fill-ins 


5, 050. 04 


Salary, Call Firemen 


5, 632. 63 


Salary, Vacation & Paid Holidays 


8, 192. 94 




108, 684. 61 


Due s 


8. 00 


Postage 


2. 91 


Travel Allowance 


600. 00 


Meals 


60. 64 


Repairs, Radios 


309. 55 


Repairs, Dept. Equipment 


147. 30 


Fire Alarm Maintenance 


503. 33 


Repairs, Vehicles 


1, 883. 23 


Supplies, Office 


66. 11 


Supplies, Uniforms 


399. 25 


Supplies, Rubberwear 


437. 45 


Small Tools & Equipment 


268. 48 


Firefighting Supplies 


335. 89 


Gasoline & Oils 


1, 111. 84 


Supplies, Tires & Tubes 


263. 52 


Supplies, Vehicles 


65. 89 


Care of Grounds 


12. 41 


Medical & First Aid Supplies 


135. 00 


Flashlights & Batteries 


102. 45 


Purchase of Radio Equipment 


1, 972. 00 


Outlay, Firefighting Equipment 


1, 412. 20 


Fire Alarm Extension 


1, 905. 64 




12 ocn DQ 

l L-t , \J\J j , \J y 


Ambulance: 




Wages, Drivers 


1, 437. 46 


Laundry & Cleaning 


47. 08 


Repairs, Vehicles 


614. 00 


Supplies, Bedding 


24. 62 


Gasoline & Oils 


247. 01 


Tires & Tubes 


215. 28 


Supplies & Accessories 


18. 00 


Medical & First Aid Supplies 


12. 88 




2, 616. 33 


Dog Officer: 




Services 


480. 00 


Travel Allowance 


360. 00 


Housing for Animals 


360. 00 


Disposal of Animals 


368. 00 




1, 568. 00 



141 



REPORT OF EXPENDITURES DURING 1962 FROM APPROPRIATIONS 



Fire Station: 






Dutch Elm: 




Electricity 


640. 


83 


Salaries, Tree Workers 


7, 894. 72 


Telephone 


405. 


91 


Repairs, Equipment 


28. 33 


Water 


60. 


72 


Supplies, Department 


176. 79 


Repairs, Station 


66. 


15 


Supplies, Chemicals 


1, 403. 75 


Supplies, Janitor 


296. 


53 




9, 503. 59 


Supplies, Fuel 


1, 199. 


74 


Gypsy Moth: 




Supplies, Building 


337. 


08 


Salaries, Tree Workers 


5, 253. 00 


Outlay, Equipment Building 


500. 


00 


Electricity 


7. 44 


Outlay, Major Repairs 


487. 


63 


Dues & Subscriptions 


1. 00 




3, 994. 


59 


Repairs, Equipment 


24. 72 


Civil Defense: 






Supplies, Chemicals 


1, 785. 75 


Clerical Services 


98. 


80 


Gasoline & Oils 


47. 00 


Telephone 


276. 


56 




7, 1 18. 91 


Communications 


48. 


30 






Travel Allowance 


134. 


36 


Town Forest: 


257. 40 


Repairs, Equipment 


39. 


78 






Supplies, Office 


6. 


00 


Mosquito Control: 


2, 000. 00 


Supplies, Department 


148. 


00 






Supplies, Departmental Training 


75. 
827. 


32 
12 


PUBLIC WORKS: 




Building Inspector: 






Town Engineer: 




Salary, Administrative 


5, 980. 


00 


Salary, Administrative 


7, 499. 96 


Salary, Clerical 


401. 


40 


Salary, Engineer's Assts. 


4, 270. 00 


Electrical Fees 


1, 468. 


85 


Due s 


13. 00 


Plumbing Fees 


547. 


00 


Repairs, Equipment 


184. 95 


Gas Piping & Gas Inspections 


20. 


30 


Supplies, Office 


226. 47 


Due s 


55. 


00 


Small Tools & Equipment 


79. 79 


Printing 


49. 


50 


Gasoline & Oil 


16. 20 


Travel Allowance 


604. 


45 




12, 290. 37 


Supplies, Office 


248. 


88 


Street Betterments: 






9, 375. 


38 


Salaries & Wages 


4, 458. 09 


Board of Appeals: 






Equipment Rental 


11, 165. 00 


Salary, Clerical 


390. 


20 


Construction Supplies 


14, 715. 19 


Dues 


15. 


00 


Recording & Contractual Services 


88. 80 


Postage 


10. 


00 




30, 427. 08 


Supplies, Office 


2. 


94 


Highway Department: 






418. 


14 


Salaries & Wages 


53, 783. 57 


Sealer, Weights & Measures: 






Rent, Equipment 


3, 427. 00 


Salary, Administrative 


500. 


00 


Electricity 


454. 39 


Supplies, Department 


2. 


21 


Telephone 


292. 27 




502. 


21 


Water 


60. 36 


Tree Warden: 






Garage Maintenance 


164. 96 


Salary, Administrative 


5,980. 


00 


Supplies, Office 


22. 21 


Due s 


34. 


00 


Weed & Brush Killer 


440. 00 


Electricity 


14. 


14 


Supplies, Fuel 


2, 224. 42 


Telephone 


106. 


05 


Small Tools & Equipment 


1, 928. 52 


Travel Allowance 


528. 


00 


Supplies, Paint, etc. 


123. 60 


Repairs, Equipment 


237. 


63 


Glass & Putty 


22. 53 


Repairs, Vehicles 


417. 


80 


Hardware 


48. 03 


Supplies, Department 


214. 


28 


Sand, Gravel & Stone 


913. 69 


Tree Planting 


1, 000. 


00 


Patch 


6, 452. 15 


Outlay, Equipment 


300. 


00 


Plant Mix 


3, 148. 45 




8, 831. 


90 


Tar & Road Oils 


572. 02 



142 



REPORT OF EXPENDITURES DURING 1962 FROM APPROPRIATIONS 



Highway Department (continued): 






Park Department (continued): 






Culverts &t Catch Basins 


1, 360 


04 


Electricity 


13 


42 


Fences &c Signs 


1, 019 


37 


Water 


16 


00 




5, 719 


34 


Equipment, Maintenance 


74. 49 


Fla shlight s & B atte rie s 


40 


50 


Supplies, Department 


73. 


00 




82, 217 


42 


band 


533. 


31 


x\oa.cl A/lacriine vy. 






Maintenance oi Orounds & Fences 


280. 


99 


Rep ai rs, E qui pm e nt 


7,213 


36 




2, 982. 


1 1 


Oasoiine & (Jil 


6, 408. 96 


Cemetery Department: 






l ire s & 1 uDe s 


747 


51 


Wages 


25, 896. 


59 


uiesei kJH 


211. 


66 


Postage 


15. 


00 




1 1, 351. 


75 


Electricity 


39. 


14 




25, 933. 


24 


Telephone 


194. 85 








Water 


24. 00 


onapter vu uonst. I7OU: 


156. 


00 


Travel Allowance 


119. 


20 








Repairs, Equipment 


545. 


25 




15,478. 


70 


Repairs, Buildings 


442. 


19 








Repairs, Vehicles 


176. 


60 


v^napier 7U jvLamt. 1 vol. 






Fuel, Heat 


115. 


8 1 


Salaries & Wages 


959. 


39 


Supplies, Department 


1 , 135. 


10 


Supplies, Construction 


3, 540. 


1 1 


Supplies, Construction 


1, 945. 


89 




4, 499. 


50 


Flowers, Shrubs & Bulbs 


141. 


00 


Chapter 81 Maintenance: 






Fertilizers 


646. 


49 


Salaries & Wages 


8, 484. 95 


Gasoline & Oil 


186. 


32 


Rent, Equipment 


1, 737. 


00 


Supplies, Liners 


676. 


20 


Sand, Gravel & Stone 


5, 760. 


21 


Outlay, Purchase of Tractor 


4, 993. 


10 


Patch 


1, 164. 89 


Outlay, Hot Top Avenues in Cemetery 


3, 499. 


10 


Koaa (Jils 


9, 400. 31 


40, 791. 


83 


Culverts & Catch Basins 


1,812. 


06 


WATER DEPARTMENT: 






Signs & Fences 


2, 146. 


00 










30, 505. 


42 


Water Betterments 1962: 


70, 314. 


16 


Snow & Ice Removal: 












Salaries & Wages 


20, 152. 


85 


Chestnut St. Wellfield: 


45, 647. 


49 




9, 010. 


00 








Meals, Workers 


321. 


50 


Maintenance & Operation: 






H onai l 4 c Kr \>T 3 l ti t" T"i a T") f ^ 7* mn n 
Acuair b ivl d 1 1 ll tr J idl 1L c , IjUuiu. 


2, 742. 


08 


Tools h. Equipment 


6, 700. 


16 


Services, Weather Control 


245. 


00 


Utilities 


8, 923. 


78 


Small Tools & Equipment 


180. 


75 


Pipes & Fittings 


12, 512. 


99 


Salt & Sand 


7, 139. 


54 


Brass Goods 


1. 


72 


Liasoiine & Uii 


1, 232. 


07 


Station Maintenance 


8, 129. 


04 


1 ir e s & l ube s 


1 17. 


45 


Equipment & Supplies 


1, 106. 


79 


Outlay, Equipment 


2, 175. 


00 


Development 


2, 196. 


48 




43, 316. 


24 


Office Supplies 


1, 350. 


01 








Meter Parts 


4, 354. 


24 


Relocate Section Boutwell Street 


2, 525. 


00 


Superintendent Expenses 


772. 


27 








System Maintenance 


73, 435. 


94 


Public Street Lights 


17, 420. 


18 




1 19, 483. 


42 


Reconstruct parts of Salem and 






HEALTH & SANITATION: 






Ballardvale Streets 


18, 224. 


58 














Garbage Collection: 


9, 000. 


00 


Park Department: 










Wages, Maintenance of Grounds 


994. 


90 


Town Dump: 


15, 500. 


00 


Wages, Police Detail 


996. 


00 







143 



REPORT OF EXPENDITURES DURING 1962 FROM APPROPRIATIONS 



Health & Sanitation: 



Admini str ative 
Clerical 

Public Health Nurse 
Substitute Nurse 
Medical Agent 
Animal Inspector 



Salary, 
Salary, 
Salary, 
Salary, 
Salary, 
Salary, 
Due s 
Printing 
Adverti sing 
Postage 
Legal Fees 
Disposal of Animals 
Expenses, Animal Inspector 
Supplies, Office 
Chemicals 
Mileage Allowances 
First Aid Supplies 
Medical Supplies 
Health Laboratory 
Hospitalization 
Immunization Clinics 
Rabies Clinic 
Polio Clinic 

Welfare Administration: 

Salar ie s 

Rent, Quarters 

Due s 

Postage 

T elephone 

Meals 

Repairs, Vehicles 
Supplies, Office 



Welfare Aid: 

Aid to Dependent Children: 

Old Age Assistance : 

Medical Assistance for Aged 

Disability Assistance: 

Veterans Benefits: 

Salary, Administrative 

Dues 

Postage 

Telephone 

Travel Allowance 

Supplies, Office 

Veterans Aid 



6, 888 


50 


202. 


40 


4, 680. 


00 


195. 


00 


700. 


00 


250. 


00 


44. 


50 


36. 


00 


306. 


88 


4. 


09 


700 


00 


150 


00 


50. 


00 


184. 


82 


2. 


98 


1 , 285. 


00 


29. 


50 


62. 


01 


247. 


86 


2, 238. 


95 


46. 


75 


477. 


20 


957. 


00 


19, 739. 


44 




70 


422. 


92 


25. 


00 


162. 


00 


146. 


27 


2. 


50 


l ? ? 


rm 

\j ~j 


219. 


33 


ft ^QQ 

O , J77- 


77 


6, 896. 


43 


20, 314. 


30 


31,015. 


58 


24, 241. 


76 


9, 221. 


23 


1, 300. 


00 


15. 


00 


30. 


00 


68. 


05 


205. 


28 


48. 


25 


46, 492. 


80 


48, 159. 


38 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

EDUCATIONAL & LIBRARY: 

Salary, Clerk of School Committee 

Non-salary Items, School Committee 

Salaries, Supt. Office 

Non-salary Items, Supt. Office 

Salaries, Child Accounting 

Salaries, Subject Spec. 

Salaries, H. S. Teachers 

H. S. Texts & Inst. Aids 

H. S. Stationery & Supplies 

H. S. Chemistry Lab 

Salaries, Elem. Teachers 

Elem. Texts fk Inst. Aids 

Elem. Stationery & Supplies 

Salaries, Subst. Teachers 

Salaries, Evening School Teachers 

Evening School Expenses 

Summer School Expenses 

Salaries, Physicians 

Salaries, School Nurses 

Health Supplies 

Mental Health Clinic 

Utilities, High School 

Utilities, Elem. Schools 

Bus Transportation 

Taxi Transportation 

Athletic Transportation 

Out of State Travel 

Libraries, Schools 

Physical Ed. k Athletics 

Salary, Cafeteria Supervisor 

Cafeteria, Non-salary Items 

Educational T V 

Outlay, New Equipment 

School Construction: 
Perm. Bldg. Com. Eng. Serv. 
Boutwell Street School 
Add. & Alt. Jr. /Sr. High School 
H. S. Athletic Field 
Glen Road School 
North Intermediate School 

Vocational Training: 
Travel Reimbursement 
Tuition Fees 



1, 





300. 


00 


1, 


061. 


36 


21, 


408. 


15 


1, 


834. 


69 


1, 


800. 


00 


52, 


246. 


00 


371, 


719. 


72 


14, 


170. 


33 


18, 


066. 


16 


7, 


211. 


12 


431 , 


254. 


08 


12, 


489. 


42 


11, 


517. 


50 


12, 


438. 


75 


6, 


323. 


00 




159. 


07 


9, 


604. 


55 


2, 


000. 


00 


8, 


044. 


90 




496. 


25 


1, 


022. 


50 


9, 


074. 


23 


1 1 , 


884. 


37 


20, 


649. 


36 


2, 


484. 


00 


1, 


115. 


50 




450. 


00 


5, 


546. 


34 


4, 


590. 


1 1 


3, 


683. 


64 


2, 


701. 


65 




870. 


25 


9, 


999. 


09 


058, 


216. 


09 




120. 


00 


18, 823. 


78 


7, 


150. 


44 




48. 


00 




400. 


00 


486, 523. 


30 


513, 065. 


52 




819. 


75 


5, 


749. 


11 



6, 568. 86 



144 



REPORT OF EXPENDITURES DURING 1962 FROM APPROPRIATIONS 



School Operating Plants: 






Bonds & Insurance: 






H. S. &; Inter. Janitor Salaries 


29, 289. 


80 


Bonds 


506. 


45 


H. S. Ext ra Help Wages 


2, 312. 


00 


Workmen's Comp. & Public Liability 


13, 690. 


70 


H. S. Repairs 


3, 746. 


97 


Public Liability, Vehicles 


2, 790. 


29 


H. S. Window Cleaning 


600. 


00 


Fire/Theft - Vehicles 


297. 


87 


H. S. Janitor Supplies 


314. 


19 


Engineer's Equipment 


39 


73 


H. S. Fuel, Heating 


8, 375. 


30 


Burglary, Office Equipment 


291. 


00 


H. S. Plant Supplies 


6, 328 


95 


Police & Fire Department 


1 , 670. 


10 


H. S. Outlay, Major Repairs 


4, 844 


79 


Boiler Insurance 


591. 


72 


Elem. Janitor Salaries 


41, 629. 


15 


Fire & Extended Coverage -Bldgs. 


18, 924. 87 


Elem. Extra Help Wages 


1,315. 


00 




38, 802. 


73 


Elem. Repairs 


5, 110. 


69 


Inte re st: 






Elem. Window Cleaning 


600. 


00 


Water Bonds 


10, 171. 


40 


Elem. Janitor Supplies 


444. 


81 


Anticipation Notes 


11, 046. 41 


Elem. Fuel Heating 


14, 762. 


59 


Fire/Police Building 


481. 


25 


Elem. Plant Supplies 


5, 096. 


32 


School Loans 


102, 1 12. 


50 


Elem. Outlay, Major Repairs 


9, 303. 


32 


Street Construction Bonds 


1, 568. 


00 


Maintenance Supervisor, Salary 


6, 500. 


00 


Public Sewer Bonds 


1, 952. 


00 


Salaries, Maintenance Help 


14, 906. 


15 


Police Bldg. /Highway Garage 


3, 584. 00 


Telephone 


180. 


31 




130, 915. 


56 


Repairs, Shop Equipment 


38. 


06 


Maturing Debt: 






Repairs, Vehicles 


133. 


56 


Water Bonds 


46, 400. 


00 


Contractual Services 


405. 


00 


Fire/Police Bonds 


5, 000. 


00 


Small Tools & Equipment 


336. 


91 


School Bonds 


260, 000. 


00 


Supplies, Repairs 


578. 


63 


Street Construction Bonds 


11, 000. 


00 


Outlay, Shop Machinery 


386. 


21 


Public Sewer Mains 


15, 000. 


00 


Wages, School Grounds 


13, 766. 


50 


Police Bldg. /Highway Garage 


14, 000. 


00 


Care of School Grounds 


4, 357. 


49 




351, 400. 


00 




175, 662. 


70 


Unclassified: 






Public Library: 


f 

4, 200. 




Training & Conferences 


1,014. 


93 


Salary, Librarian 


00 


Town Report 


1, 700. 


68 


Wages, Asst. Librarian 


1,987. 


50 


Tax Title & Legal Assistance 


350. 


00 


Wages, Vacation Substitute 


1, 572. 


50 


Town Clock Repairs 


45. 


00 


Wages, Janitor 


433. 


00 


Unpaid Bills of previous years 


1, 209. 


44 


Services, Clerical 


1, 146. 


59 


Reserve Fund 


18, 388. 


27 


Binding 


81. 


53 


Memorial Day 


1, 000. 


00 


Electricity 


235. 


41 


Lease of Quarters 


2, 250. 


00 


Telephone 


108. 


43 


4-H Town Committee 


100. 


00 


Water 


24. 


00 




26, 058. 


32 


Repairs, Building 


119. 


46 








Supplies, Office 


473. 


74 








Supplies, Library 


6,954. 


37 








Supplies, Fuel Oil 


127. 


76 








Outlay, Office Equipment 


125. 


00 










17, 589. 


29 








Recreation: 












Salary, Director 


850. 


00 








Salaries, Supervisors 


6, 266. 


00 








Utilities 


34. 


54 








Supplies, Office 


15. 


83 








Supplies, First Aid 


50. 


35 








Supplies, Playground &t Beach 


199. 


04 








Prize Awards 


75. 
7, 490. 


00 
76 









145 



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This team won the Lowell Suburban League Championship for the 1962 
season. For the second consecutive year, Wilmington High has been 
undefeated. Statewide, Wilmington shares Class C Championship 
honors with three other high schools. The boys played in a manner 
representative of the best in sportsmanship, bringing honor to them- 
selves, their parents, their school, and their community. 




FIRE ALARM SIGNALS 



32 Boutwell School 

33 Buzzell School 
35 Center School 

37 Glen Rd. School 

38 High School 

41 Mildred Rogers School 

42 North Intermediate 
School 

44 Swain School 
46 Walker School 
48 West School 
51 Whitefield School 
53 Wildwood School 

121 Main & Church Sts. 

122 Main St. & 
Middlesex Ave. 

1 222 Bay State Steel Co. 

123 Main & Clark Sts. 

124 Washington Ave. 

125 Wilmington Plaza 

126 Main St. & Bridge Lane 

1 27 Brand Ave. & Wiser St. 

128 Baker St. & Taplin Ave. 

129 Phillips Ave. & Wiser St. 

131 Hobson Ave. & Miles St. 

132 Main St. & 
Massachusetts Ave. 

133 Massachusetts Ave. 8. 
River St. 

134 Main & Harnden Sts. 

135 St. Dorothy's Church 

1 36 Veranda Ave. 

137 Main St. & Grove Ave. 

138 Grove & Wild Aves. 

139 Grove Ave. 8i 
Burnap St. 

141 Grove Ave. & Lake St. 

142 Main St. & Glen Rd. 

143 Main & Lake Sts. 

144 Lake St. & Fitz Terrace 

145 Lake St. & Warren Rd. 

146 Main & Davis Sts. 

147 Fairfield Ave. 

148 Marjorie Rd. 

149 Main St. at Tewksbury 
Line 



211 Burlington 8. Floradale 

Aves. 

2111 Diamond Crystal Salt 
Company 

2112 Sweetheart Plastic Corp. 

212 Burlington Ave. & 
Harris St. 

213 Cedar St. 8. Burt Rd. 

214 Deming Way (Old Age 
Housing) 

215 Burlington Ave. & 
Chestnut St. 

216 Chestnut St. 8. 
Butters Row 

217 Chestnut St. & Mill Rd. 

218 Chestnut St. 8, 
Hillside Way 

219 Hillside Way at 
Burlington Line 

221 Chestnut St. near 
Golf Club 

222 Chestnut St. at Woburn 
Line 

223 Marion & Day Sts. 

224 Marion & Clifton Sts. 

225 Marion St. to 
Chestnut St. 

226 Roberts Road 

227 Burlington Ave. 8. 
Boutwell St. 

228 Boutwell St. 8, Taft Rd. 

229 Taft 8. Swain Rds. 
231 Roosevelt Rd. 



232 Burlington Ave. & 
Dell Drive 

233 Burlington Ave. 8. 
Swain Rd. 

234 Beech St. 

235 Burlington Ave. & 
Forest St. 

236 Burlington Ave. at 
Burlington Line 

237 Forest St. & Congress St. 

238 Forest St. & 
Randolph Rd. 

239 Forest St. & 
Cochrane Rd. 

241 Elwood Rd. 

242 Forest St. 8, 
Edwards Rd. 

251 Shawsheen Ave. 8. 
Canal St. 

252 Canal St. & Burt Rd. 

253 Grand St. 

254 Nassau Ave. 8, 
Dunton Rd. 

255 Shawsheen Ave. & 
Carter Lane 

256 Carter Lane & 
Norfolk St. 

257 Amherst Rd. 

258 Auburn Ave. 

259 Ferguson Rd. 

261 Shawsheen Ave. & 
Aldrich Rd. 

262 Aldrich Rd. & 
Hubbard St. 

263 Aldrich Rd. & 
Kendall St. 

264 Aldrich Rd. & 
Boutwell St. 

265 Aldrich Rd. 8, Forest St. 

266 Winston Ave. 

267 Aldrich Rd. at 
Billerica Line 

268 Shawsheen Ave. near 
Cranberry Bog 

269 Wilton Drive 

271 Shawsheen Ave. & 
Bond St. 

273 Shawsheen Ave. & 
Hopkins St. 

274 Hopkins & Columbia 
Streets 

275 Hopkins & Dorchester 
Streets 

276 Hopkins St. at 
Billerica Line 

277 Shawsheen Ave. & 
Nichols St. 

278 Nichols St. & 
Foirmeadow Rd. 

279 Fairmeadow 8. 
Jere Rds. 

281 Nichols St. at 
Billerica Line 

282 Shawsheen Ave. at 
Billerica Line 

311 Main St. & Dublin Ave. 

312 Main & Lowell Sts. 
3121 Hayden Mica Co. 

313 Main St. 8. Butters Row 

314 Main St. at Town Park 

315 Main & Eames Sts. 

316 Eames St. 

3161 J. W. Greer Co. 

3162 National Polychemical 
Co., Inc. 

3163 Dragon Cement Co. 

3164 Raffi 8. Swanson Inc. 

317 Cook Ave. 

318 Main St. at Woburn 
Line 



321 Lowell & Parker Sts. 

322 Parker & Blackstone 
Streets 

323 Lowell & Cross Sts. 

324 Lowell & Bay Sts. 
3241 Avco Corp. 

325 Lowell & Woburn Sts. 

326 Woburn & Elm Sts. 

327 Woburn St. 8. 
Brentwood Ave. 

328 Woburn St. 8. 
Morse Ave. 

329 Woburn & Eames Sts. 

3291 Terrell Corp. 

3292 Webtex Cement 

3293 Ritter Trucking 

331 Woburn St. at 
Woburn Line 

332 Strout Ave. 

333 Lowell St. & 
Woodland Rd. 

334 Lowell & West Sts. 

335 West St. & Westdale 
Avenue 

336 Ayotte St. & Crest Ave. 

337 Nickerson Ave. 

338 West St. & 
Suncrest Ave. 

339 Suncrest Ave. & 
Meadow Lane 

341 West St. at Reading 
Line 

342 Lowell St., Rte. 93 and 
Reading Line 

411 Church St., Fire Station 

412 Church & Columbia Sts. 

413 Church & Beacon Sts. 

41 4 Beacon St. 8> 
Belmont Ave. 

415 State St. 8. 
Fairview Ave. 

416 Church & Clark Sts. 

417 Methodist Church 

418 Church St. & 
Thurston Ave. 

419 Church & Adams Sts. 

421 Chandler & Kelley Rds. 

422 Adams St. Ext. 

423 Church St. & 
Middlesex Ave. 

424 Middlesex Ave. 8. 
Adelaide St. 

425 Middlesex Ave. & 
Clark St. 

426 Clark St. & 
Railroad Ave. 

427 Middlesex Ave. 8. 
Adams St. 

428 St. Thomas' Church 

429 Middlesex Ave. & 
School St. 

431 School St. & Drury Lane 

432 Drury Lane 8, 
Loumac Rd. 

433 Powderhouse Circle 

434 Middlesex Ave. & 
Wildwood St. 

435 Wildwood St. near 
Cemetery 

436 Wildwood St. near 
Vets Housing 

437 Wildwood 8. Woburn 
Streets 

438 Wing Rd. 

51 1 Middlesex Ave. & 
Glen Rd. 

512 Glendale Circle 

513 Glen Rd. & 
Lawrence St. 



514 Lawrence St. & 
Lawrence Ct. 

515 Lawrence St. & 
Hamlin Lane 

516 Glen Rd. at 
R.R. Crossing 

517 Glen Rd. & Fay St. 

518 Glen Rd. 8, King St. 

519 King St. & Garden Ave. 

521 King & Kilby Sts. 

522 King & Broad Sts. 

523 Glen Rd. & Cypress St. 

524 Glen Rd. & Brattle St. 

525 Glen Rd. 8. Harnden St. 

526 Glen 8. Miller Rds. 

527 Faulkner & Beeching 
Aves. 

528 Faulkner & Allston 
Aves. 

529 Jones Ave. 

531 Town Hall 

532 Congregational Church 

533 Middlesex Ave. & 
Federal St. 

534 Federal & Concord 
Streets 

535 Federal & Grant Sts. 

536 Federal & Wilson Sts. 

537 Federal 8, Lincoln Sis. 

538 Federal 8. Pershing Sts. 

539 Federal & Liberty Sts. 

541 Federal & Woburn Sts. 

542 Woburn & West Sts. 

543 West 8. Kilmarnock Sts. 

545 Woburn St. at 
R.R. Crossing 

546 Concord & Woburn Sts. 

547 Concord St. at Rte. 93 

548 Concord St. at North 
Reading Line 

549 Woburn St. at No. 281 

551 Middlesex & Mystic 
Aves. 

551 2 Photon Inc. 

5513 D. F. Munroe Paper Co. 

5514 Waltham Door & 
Window Co. 

552 Middlesex Ave. & Shady 
Lane Drive 

5521 Mytron Inc. 

553 Shady Lane Drive & 
Oakdale Rd. 

554 Shady Lane Drive & 
Birchwood Rd. 

555 Shady Lane Drive & 
Sprucewood Rd. 

556 Pinewood & Oakdale 
Roads 

557 Birchwood & Judith Rds. 

558 Shady Lane Drive & 
Lawrence St. 



61 1 No. Wilmington 
Shopping Center 

612 Middlesex Ave. & 
North St. 

613 North St. & 
Pineridge Rd. 

614 North St & Marcia Rd. 

615 Middlesex Ave. & 
High St. 

616 Linda & Carolyn Rds. 

617 High & Woburn Sts. 

618 Woburn & Park Sts. 

619 Park St. & Gowing Rd. 

621 Gowing & Marcus Rds. 

622 Park St. at No. Reading 
Line 

623 Middlesex Ave. 8. 
Salem St. 



624 Arlene & Catherine 

Aves. 

625 Barbara & Dorothy 
Aves. 

626 Salem St. at 
R.R. Crossing 

627 Salem & Cunningham 
Streets 

628 Salem St. & 
McDonald Rd. 

629 McDonald Rd. to End 

631 Royal St. 

632 Salem St. at Tewksbury 
Line 

633 Salem & Ballardvale 
Streets 

634 Ballardvale St. at 
Rte. 125 

635 Ballardvale St. at 
No. 211 

6351 Charles River Breeding 
Laboratories 

636 Ballardvale St. at 
No. 326 

637 Ballardvale St. at 
Andover Line 

638 Salem St. at Rte. 93 

639 Salem & Woburn Sts. 

641 Woburn St. & 
Hathaway Rd. 

642 Hawthorne Rd. 

643 Hathaway & 
Sheridan Rds. 

644 Hathaway & Gunderson 
Roads 

645 Salem St. & Thrush Rd. 

646 Thrush Rd. 8, 
Marie Drive 

647 Salem St. at North 
Reading Line 

6471 Cronin's Pit 

6472 Benevento's Pit 

648 Woburn & Andover 
Streets 

6481 Pumping Station 
(Water Dept.) 

6482 Insul Tab. Co. 
Ainsworth Rd. 

6483 Highway Dept. 

649 Andover St. & Rte. 12i 

651 Andover St. ot No. 31? 

652 Andover St. ot Andove 
Line 

SPECIAL SIGNALS 

1 Test 

2 All out (test 9 a. m. < 
9 p. m.) 

3 Special Call 

4 Brush Fire 

5 Police Call 
666 Civil Defense 

7 Boy Scouts 

22 No School (7 a. m. & 
7.15 a. m. ) 

2 Followed by 3 round 
of box — second alan 

3 Followed by 3 round 
of box — general alorr 

MUTUAL AID 
(two rounds only) 

8 Out of Town 

81 To Andover 

82 To Billerica 

83 To Burlington 

84 To Lowell 

85 To No. Reading 

86 To Reading 

87 To Tewksbury 

88 To Woburn 



POLICE 
Numbers 
8-3331 or 8-3332 



AMBULANCE 
Numbers 
8-3200 or 8-3346 



FIRE 
Numbers 
8-3200 or 8-3346 



Annual Report 




TOWN OF WILMINGTON 
Massachusetts 



(& 

I. 
.0 

• — 

o 



INDEX 



Accepted Streets k8 

Animal Inspector 69 

Board of Appeals 30 

Board of Assessors • 10 

Board of Health 65 

Board of Public Welfare 58 

Board of Registrars ........... . ...... 7 

Board of Selectmen .............. 2 

Boards, Committees, and Commissions ...... 5 

Building Inspector 29 

Carter (Sarah D. J.) Lecture Fund •••••• • . . . • 19 

Cemetery Department ........... • 36 

Constable 9 

Directory of Officials k 

Dog Officer ♦ , 21 

Fire Department • . . 23 

Highway Department .... ........ ........ 25 

Housing Authority .« ......... .......... 56 

Jury List , 62 

Maintenance Department ......... . . ........ hh 

Permanent Building Committee $.,....«..«,..* 6I4. 

Planning Board . . . . 12 

Police Department * ...... 20 

Public Library 15 

Recreation Commission 37 

School Committee • 38 

Sealer of Weights & Measures ......... 27 

Superintendent of Schools • 

Town Accountant . .......... 98 

Town Clerk 8 

Town Collector 11+ 

Town Counsel ............ 16 

Town Engineer • 2i+. 

Town Manager ........ • ......... 3 

Town Meetings: Annual Town Meeting - Mar. 2, 1963 • 72 

Special Town Meeting - Jan, 21, 1963 .......... 70 

Special Town Meeting - May 27, 1963 85 

Warrant Annual Town Meeting - Mar. U4., 19614- .......... 90 

Town Treasurer • • 13 

Tree Department 28 

Veterans' Agent. 55 

Water & Sewer Department ....... 22 

North Intermediate School Front Cover 



Town of Wilmington 
Massachusetts 

board of selectmen 



To the Citizens of Wilmington: 

Herewith is presented the Annual Report of your Board of Selectmen 
for the year ended December 31* 1963» 

Following the election of Mr. Rene LaRivee and Mr. Charles H. Black, 
the Board organized with Mr. Black as Chairman. 

Mr. Gerald R. Bouchard, who was elected by the Board of Selectmen 
on February 27, 1963, assumed his duties on March 25» 1963« 

Reference is made to other sections of this Annual Report for more 
particular information regarding the activities of the Town Manager 
and the Departments of the Town. 

The Board of Selectmen has had a very busy year. The Town continues 
to grow with new and desirable industry, and more industries are 
considering locations in Wilmington, more homes have been built and 
more are being planned. With a constant demand for improved and 
more facilities, it is difficult to balance the need for such facili- 
ties with the ability of the taxpayer to pay. We cannot promiscuously 
spend without overburdening YOU the taxpayer; we must have assessable 
property to assist you, and in this respect your Selectmen and Town 
Manager are endeavoring to attain this goal. 

The Board of Selectmen takes this opportunity to thank the Town Manager 
Members of Town Boards and Commissions, Department Heads, Employees, 
and other Citizenry who have contributed to the progress and welfare 
of our Community. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Charles H. Black, Chairman 
Wavie M. Drew 
Nicholas L. DeFelice 
John Brooks 
Rene J. LaRivee 



Town Manager 



To the Citizens of Wilmington: 

The Annual Report contained herein highlights the comprehensive role your town 
government plays in the day to day activities of each citizen. Underlining this 
role is our ever present goal to provide you with the maximum amount of govern- 
mental service available for your tax dollar. As one of the town's stockholders, 
you have every right to expect that your town government will be run efficiently 
and in a businesslike manner. It is to this end that your town employees have 
pledged their loyal service. 

As your Town Manager, I am proud to present the review of last year's operations 
contained in this report. Wilmington's accomplishments include: 

1. Initiation of a program for the short-term investment of idle 
funds to increase Town revenues. 

2. Initiation of the Town Hall News Letter to keep the citizens 
informed about the progress being made to improve town govern- 
ment services and operations. 

3. A polioe consultant was retained to review the operations of 
the Wilmington Police Department to find out how to improve 
services to the public. 

Ij.. A Planning Consultant was hired to render professional advice 
to the Town with respeot to garden type apartment home develop- 
ments and rezoning along 93 to insure continued industrial 
expansion in Wilmington. 

5. Initiation of electronic data processing for various clerical 
operations including water billing and the voter registration 
and persons listed publications. 

6. Cooperated with the Chamber of Commerce in its newly established 
annual clean-up program. 

7. Construction of the Woburn Street School due for completion in 
the fall of I96I4.. 

8. Sale of the veterans houses on Wildwood Street which returned 
to the tax roles thirteen homes formerly exempt from the local 
property tax. 

9. At the direction of the Board of Selectmen a comprehensive pro- 
gram for relieving some 21 drainage problems was initiated. 

Your town government is committed to a course of action which will make Wilmington 
a better place in which to live, work, and do better business. With the cooperation 
and assistance of a fine Board of Selectmen, a sound administrative organization and 
the support of all our citizens, we look forward to continued progress during the 
coming year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

G. R. Bouchard 
Town Manager 



3 



DIRECTORY OF OFFICIALS - 1963 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



Charles H. Black, Chairman 
Nicholas L. DeFelice 
John D. Brooks 
Wavie M. Drew 
Rene J. LaRivee 



Term 
Expires 

1966 

1965 
196$ 
1966 



TOWN MANAGER 



Gerald R. Bouchard 



TOWN MODERATOR 



Simon Cutter 



Annually 



L 

(0 
k 

u 

'18 

o 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



Arthur V. Lynch, Chairman 

Glen E. Connolly, Vice Chairman 

Richard E. Keane, Secretary 

George G. Robertie 

Edward F. Page 

John F. Hartnett 



1961; 
1965 
1966 
196^ 
1965 
1966 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 



Harold S. Shea 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 



George W. Boylen, Jr., Chairman 
Richard Barry, Vice Chairman 
Ralph H. Biggar, Secretary 
William P. Curtin 
Cornelius F. Joyce 
William A. Stickney 
John G. Hayward 
Frederick L. Arsenault 
Carlo E. Gubellini 



1965 
1966 
1966 

l%k 
196k 

196k 
1965 
1965 
1966 



1+ 



BOARDS, COMMITTEES, AND COMMISSIONS 



APPEAL, BOARD OF 

Louis E. Gage, Cha irman 

Parker E. Hodgdon 

Bruce MacDonald 

Ernest W. Jamison, Associate 

Lloyd C. Bender, III, Associate 



Term 
Expires 

tm 

1965 
1966 
1961; 
196^ 



LIBRARY TRUSTEES 
Ralph Kelmon, Cha irman 
May Hadley 
Philip B. Buzzell 
Elizabeth N. Neilson 
Frankline E. Allen 
Ernest M. Wallent, D.D.S. 



Term 
Expires 
\%k 

1965 
1966 
1966 
196ij. 
1965 



ASSESSORS, BOARD OF 
Frederic E. Grimes, Principal 
Olive M. Sheldon 
Maurice D. O'Neil 



CARTER LECTURE FUND COMMITTEE 

Mildred E. Neilson 1965 

Madelon C. Slater 1961; 

Guy E. Nichols 1961+ 

Jacqueline C. Piatt 1961; 

Helen P. Hay ward 1966 



CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 

Joseph B. McMahon, Chairman 1965 

Guy E. Nichols 1966 

William F. Cavanaugh 1961+ 



ELECTION OFFICERS 

Harold E. Melzar, Warden Annually 
Stanley Webber, Deputy Warden 
Simon Cutter, Clerk 
Mildred A. Dolan, Inspector 
Olive M. Sheldon, Inspector 
Florence Balkus, Deputy Inspector 
Elizabeth Cpvanaugh, Deputy Insp. 



HEALTH, BOARD OF 

Marion C. Boylen, Chairman 1961; 

Edward T. Driscoll 1965 

Augustus C. Walker, Jr. 1965 



HISTORICAL COMMITTEE 
Rhoda H. Buzzell 
Harry R. Deming 
Gladys H. MacLeod 
Harold E. Melzar 
Elizabeth N. Neilson 



HOUSING AUTHORITY 

Edwin F. Forrest, Chairman 1968 

James P. Donahue, Vice Chairman 196? 

Ralph D. Peterson, Treasurer 1966 

Walter J. Gustus, Asst. Treasurer 1961; 
Ernest M. Crispo, Secretary & Rep. 

of State Housing Bd. 1968 



PERMANENT BUILDING COMMITTEE 

Robert B. Michelson, Chairman 1965 

Raymond G. McClure, Secretary 1965 

Ralph R. Currier 1966 

William R. Harrison 1965 

Robert H. Barry 1966 



PLANNING BOARD 

James F. Banda, Chairman 1967 

Austin L. Rounds, Secretary 1968 

John R. Evans 1965 

Joseph J. Slater 1966 

A. Daniel Gillis 1967 

James R. Miceli 1961; 

Melvin I. Bloom 1961; 

RECREATION COMMISSION 
Donald F. Hebsch, Chairman 
Lawrence H. Cushing, Director 
Carl A. Backman 
John W. McCann 
George B. Dyas 
Maybelle A. Bliss 

REGISTRARS, BOARD OF 

Joseph P. Ring, Chairman 1961; 
F. Talbot Emery 1966 
Phyllis M. O'Leary 1965 
Esther L. Russell, Clerk 



TRUSTEES OF TRUST FUNDS 

Philip B. Buzzell, Chairman 1966 

Harold E. Melzar 196I; 

Edward M. Neilson 1965 



WATER & SEWER COMMISSIONERS 

Harold E. Melzar, Chairman 1966 

Arnold C. Blake 1965 

Waldo A. Stevens 1961; 



WELFARE, BOARD OF PUBLIC 
Maurice D. O'Neil, Chairman 
Florence A. Balkus 
Anna M. Low 

Walter F. Coleman, Director and 

Secretary 



5 



OFFICERS & DEPARTMENT HEADS 



Accountant 
Animal Inspector 
Building Inspector 
Cemetery Superintendent 
Civil Defense Director 
Constables 

Director of Public Welfare 

Dog Officer 

Engineer 

Fence Viewer 

Fire Chief 

Gas Inspector 

Highway Superintendent 

Librarian 

Maintenance Superintendent 

Medical /gent, Board of Health 

Milk Inspector 

Moth Superintendent 

Nurse, Public Health 

Nurses, School 

Physicians, School 

Plumbing Inspector 

Police Chief 

Sealer, Weights and Measures 
Slaughtering Inspector 
Town Clerk 

Town Clerk (Assistant) 
Town Collector 
Town Counsel 
Town Sanitarian 
Town Treasurer 
Tree Warden 
Veterans Agent 
Veterans Grave Officer 
Water Superintendent 
Wire Inspector 



Robert H. Peters 
Leo E. LeBlanc 
Minot J. Anderson 
Francis Downs 
Robert J. Woods 
Arthur J. Kelley A. John Imbimbo 

Walter Coleman 
Leo E. LeBlanc 
Alphonse Savignac 
Maurice O'Neil 
Arthur J. Boudreau 
Herbert W. Pickering 
James H. White 
Clara P. Chipman 
Anton Thiel 
Gerald Fagan, M. D. 
Ernest F. Romano 
John W. Babine 
Ann Butters, R. N. 
Helen E. Martin, R. N., Sylvia Levine, R. N. 
Ernest C. MacDougall, M. D., Gerald Fagan, M. D. 

Herbert W, Pickering 
Paul J . Lynch 
George H. Gonzales 
Leo E. LeBlanc 
Esther L. Russell 
Sylvia L. Bowman 
Miriam H. Colucci 
Philip B. Buzzell 
Ernest F. Romano 
Grace H. Rice 
John W. Babine 
Arthur B. Harper 
Guy E. Nichols 
Edmund H. Sargent 
Charles Webster 



6 



Board of Registrars 



In accordance with Section 1, Chapter 3, of the Town By-laws, meetings of the Board of 
Registrars are held on the second Monday of each month for the registration of voters and 
the conduct of business. Under Chapter 626 of the Acts of 195>8, this meeting is open to 
the public and the press and is so posted in the Town Hall. 

The Board also holds many extra meetings for the purpose of certifying names on nomination 
papers and warrant articles. All-day registrations are held as posted. 

Women married prior to January 1 must re-register under their marriage name. Naturalized 
citizens must have their naturalization papers with them when registering. 

New residents are requested to notify the Board of Registrars of the date which they take 
residence in the town. Any change of address within the town during the year should be 
brought to the attention of the Board so that vour name will not be removed from the voting 
list inadvertently. 

In order to keep the voting list as up-to-date as possible, the Board annually comperes 
the voting list with the yearly census. If a voter's name does not appear in the census, 
it is subject to removal from the voting register. 

The Board of Registrars is in the process of transferring all census information to I.B.M. 
cards in compliance with the Town Manager's directive. This should make for greater 
accuracy and efficiency. 



POPULATION - January 1963 



13,878 



DOGS - listed by Registrars 



l>klk 



REGISTERED VOTERS - January 7, 1963 



1,099 



Republicans 



1,600 



Democrats 



Independents 



Total Voters 



7 



Town Clerk 



Vital Statistics - Chapter l±6, General Lews as Amended : 

BIRTHS - final figure for 1962 . . . Three Hundred Thirty (330) 

BIRTHS - actually recorded to date for 1963 . . . Two Hundred Eighty-five (285) 
(This figure will be increased when the final reports are in) 

MARRIAGE INTENTIONS - recorded in 1963 . . . One Hundred Thirty-two (132) 

MARRIAGES - recorded in 1963 . . . One Hundred Thirty-six (136) 

DEATHS - recorded in 1963 . . . One Hundred Thirteen (113) 



Chapter I+6, Section 1$ : 

The Town Clerk will furnish to parents, householders, physicians, and registered hospital 
medical officers applving therefor, blanks for the return of births as required by law. 



pi Chapter llht Section lj.5 ? 

Fifty-one (51) Burial Permits have been issued by the Town Clerk as Special Agent for the 
j Board of Health in 1963. 

| 

TOWN RECORDS 

Permits and Certificates of Registration for the Storage of Inflammables : 

These licenses must be registered by the owner or occupant of the land, or by the holder of 
the license in the Town Clerk's office on or before April 30 of each year. Notification 
will be sent on or about March 15. If not registered as required by law, the license may 
be revoked by the licensing authority, after a public hearing. 



Inflammables 03 

Uniform Commercial Code recordings • 291 

Federal Tax Lien recordings 23 

Uniform Commercial Code Terminations 9U 

Dog Licenses issued (as of l/7/6/j.) 1*306 

Duplicate Dog Tags issued 25 

Business Certificates Recorded. 15 

Business Withdrawals 3 

Fish and Game Licenses issued 706 

Pole Locations recorded 12 

Medical Registrations 1 



8 



Other Services: 



Keep minutes of Annual and Special Town Meetings up-to-date 
(certify same ) 

Keep jury list up-to-date. Draw jurors when court orders 
come through 

Certified copies of Births, Marriages and Deaths 278 

Birth record card (abstract ) - used for school entrance, 
drivers' licenses, out-of-state travel and job 
applications 131 

Proof of residence - by letter or card undetermined number 

Town By-laws, books and maps undetermined number 



The Town Clerk, in her capacity as a Justice of the Peace, certified an undetermined 
number of legal papers for Town Officers. She also swears Town Officers to faithful 
performance of duties and keeps record of same. 



By virtue of her office, the Town Clerk is clerk to the Board of Registrars. In this 
capacity, I have 

Met with the Board on regular meetings and special meetings 
Kept the minutes of the Board up-to-date 
Worked with the Police on the census 
Kept the voting list up-to-date 
Registered voters during office hours 

Supervised the distribution and filing of nomination papers 
Prepared the ballot 
Hired election workers 

Prepared payrolls for election workers 
Supervised elections 



There are twenty-four (2i|J books, "Births, Marriages and Deaths" from 1730 to I898, com- 
piled by James E. Kelley still available at this office. By vote of the Selectmen, these 
books are on sale at $1.00 each. 

In order to complete our records, the Town Clerk would like to receive copies of back years 
of "Persons Listed" books. If you have such books and are willing to dispose of them, 
please contact this office. 



Constable 



I herewith submit my annual report as Constable of the Town of Wilmington for the year 
ending 1963. I have posted Notices and Warrants for the Annual Town Meeting and Special 
Town Meetings in accordance with the By-laws of the Town of Wilmington. I have also posted 
notices for other Departments and Officers of the Town of Wilmington, 



9 



Board of Assessors 



TABLE OF AGGREGATES FOR WILMINGTON 
OF POLLS, PROPERTY, AND TAXES, AS ASSESSED 
JANUARY 1, 1963 



L 



L 

3 

Ik 





Compiled from the figures entered in the Valuation List 



Individuals 
IB 

lj.105 
129 



Number of Persons Assessed : 
On Personal Estate Only 
On Real Estate Only 
On Both Personal and Real Estate 
Total Number of Persons Assessed 
Total Number of Polls Assessed 

Value of Assessed Personal Estate : 
Stock in Trade 
Machinery 
Live Stock 

All Other Tangible Personal Property 

Total Value of Assessed Personal Estate 

Value of Assessed Real Estate : 

Land Exclusive of Buildings 
Buildings Exclusive of Land 

Total Value of Assessed Real Estate 

Total Valuation of Assessed Estate 

Tax Rate per $1,000 - $38.00 

Taxes for ?tate, County, and Town purposes, including Overlay : 
On Personal Estate 
On Real Estate 
On Polls 



All 
Other 
~ol~ 
111 

23 



Total Taxes Assessed 

Number of Live Stock Assessed : 

Horses (1 year old, or over ) 

Neat Cattle: (1 year old, or over) 

Cows (Milch) 
Bulls 2, Oxen 0, Steers 1, Heifers 13 
Swine (6 months old, or over) 
Sheep (6 months old, or over) 
Fowl 

All Other 

Number of Acres of Land. Assessed 
Number of Dwellings Assessed 



General 
16 



56 
k 

k9 



Total 



79 
lj.216 
152 

mi 

3667 



mo, 37£.oo 

191,350.00 
35,200.00 
1,332,850.00 

1,699,775.00 



6,279,150.00 
Si, kko, 100.00 

57,719,250.00 

59,1+19,025.00 



61+,591.U5 
2,193,331.50 
7,332.00 

2,265,25^.95 
Farm Animals 



16 

813 
6 

8500 
691 

10,31;0 
3,533 



10 



RECAPITULATION - 1963 



Total Appropriations (Taxation) 
Total Appropriations (Available Funds) 
Tax Title Foreclosures 
Overlay Deficits (Overdrafts) 
Total Deficits (Abatements) 
Pension Fund 

State Parks and Reservations 
State Audit 
Metropolitan Sewerage 

Metropolitan Sewerage Connection Charge 
County Tax 

Tuberculosis Hospital Assessment 

Tuberculosis Hospital Assessment (1962 Underestimate) 
Overlay 

Gross amount to be raised 

Less Estimated Receipts and Available Funds : 
Income Tax 
Corporation Taxes 

Reimbursement Publicly Owned Land 

Old Age Tax (Meals ) 

Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise 

Licenses 

Special Assessments 
General Government 

Protection of Persons and Property 

Health and Sanitation 

Charities 

Old Age Assistance 
Veterans' Services 
Schools 
Libraries 
Cemeteries 

Interest on Taxes and Assessments 

State Assistance for School Construction 

Farm Animal Excise 

Unclassified 

Total Estimated Receipts 

Overestimates previous years to be used as Avail. Funds 
Voted from Available Funds 
Total Available Funds 

Total Estimated Receipts and Available Funds 
Net Amount to be Raised by Taxation 

Personal Property 1,699,775 @ $38.00 per M 

Real Estete 57,719,250 @ $38.00 per M 

Polls 3,666 @ 2.00 each 

Total Taxes Levied on Polls and Property 

Items not entering into the determination of the Tax Rate : 

1. Betterment and Special Assessments added to taxes: 

a. Street Betterments and Interest 

b. Water Betterments end Interest 

2. Water liens added to Taxes 

Total 



$2,761+, 290. 71+ 
69,91+6.61+ 
1+32.00 
32,251.98 
301+.1+0 
37,321.88 
k, 776. 51+ 
153.16 
32,079.37 
7,660.11+ 
21,381.35 
8,376.19 
7 61+. 69 
111,893.11+ 



201,2i+l+.36 
26,125.79 
70.82 
3,767.20 
229,000.00 
1+, 000.00 
2,000.00 

l+,5oo.oo 

1+,800.00 
1,800.00 
1+0,1+00.00 
20,100.00 
18,600.00 
67,800.00 
1,181.25 
3,300.00 
7,100.00 
113,271+. 1+1 

350.00 

1,800.00 
751,213.83 

5,238.80 

69,91+6.61+ 
75.1B5.uiI 



$2,831+, 237. 38 



257,1+16.81+ 
3, 091,651+. 22 



826,399.27 
2, 265,251+. 95 

61+, 591. 1+5 
2,193,331.50 

,7,332.00 
2, 265,251+. 95 



9,51+9.30 
7,347.71 
7,616.87 
21+, 513.88 



11 



Planning Board 



General Planning : 

Review of the Zoning By-law was continued during 1963 to keep it up-to-date and insure the 
health, safety, and welfare of the inhabitants of Wilmington through sound and orderly 
growth. Recognizing that the town is now experiencing rapid residential, industrial, and 
commercial growth, particular attention was directed to the study of: 

1. Proper balance between residential, business, and industrial growth. 

2. Available area zoned as Industrial District and its potential for 
development. 

3. The advisability of providing permissive zoning for garden-type 
apartments . 

II. Present end future need for parks and recreation areas. 

5>. Master Plan by consultant on industrial area, garden-type apartments 
and street usage. 

6. Conservation. 



Zoning : 

Nine articles pertaining to amendment of the Zoning Map were processed for Town Meeting 
action. Public hearings were held by the Boa^d in accordance with zoning regulations, and 
recommendations were made to the Town Meetings. 

Plot Plans : 

All plans of land to be recorded at the Registry must be signed by the Planning Board eithe 
as component parts of a subdivision or as plans which do not constitute a subdivision. To 
determine each lot's status requires detailed scrutiny and checking by means of town record 
and maps. The Board processes many such plans each meeting. 



Subdivision : 

Several subdivisions were fully considered after required public hearings. They were 
accepted after many clarifications and changes had been made. Some of them were: Jackson 
Heights, Esquire Estates, continuation of Signore, Tocci Subdivision, DeCarolis, etc. 



Parks and Recreation: 



The Planning Board, as Board of Park Commissioners, completed many improvements at Silver 
Lake Beach such as: installing new sanitary facilities; enlarging and improving the beach 
area; more safety regulations for bathers; and first aid. There were also more general 
improvements for other town recreation. 



12 



General : 



The Planning Board has appeared at numerous Board of Appeal hearings end Permanent Building 
Committee hearings offering their services to these Boards if they so desire. 



The Planning Board wishes to thank all persons attending meetings and offering their con- 
structive criticism. This led to a better relationship and understanding of the functions 
of this Board. 




Cash in Treasury January 1, 1963 



$ 369,1|.0$.57 



Total Receipts 1963 



5,67lj.,710.6l 



6,0i|4,ll6.l8 



Less Payments by Treasury Warrant 



6,082,515.17 



Deficit 



38,398.99 



U. S. Treasury Notes on Hand 



$1,009, 1*23.51 



13 



Town Collector 



1963 
Commitments 



Prior Commitment a : 
Poll 

Personal Property 

Real Estate 

Farm Excise 

Motor Vehicle Excise 

Current Commitments ; 
PoTI 

Personal Property- 
Real Estate 
Farm Excise 
Motor Vehicle Excise 

Betterments : 

Prior Commitments ; 
Apportioned Water 
Committed Interest 
Apportioned Street 
Committed Interest 
Water Liens 

Current Commitments ; 
Apportioned Water 
Committed Interest 
Apportioned Street 
Committed Interest 
Water Liens 

Unapportioned Water 
Unapportioned Street 

Apportioned Wpter paid in advance 
Committed Interest 

Apportioned Street paid in advance 
Committed Interest 

Interest and Costs 

Ambulance 

Estate of Deceased Person 
Lien Certificates 
Advertising Charges 



(1962) 



11,247.23 



7,376.00 
64, 591J 4 5 
2,200,703.50 
267. IB 
264,090.17 



4,634.% 
2,712.85 
5,369.65 
4,437.4> 
7,616 



62,399.82 
30,787.65 
(Balances to be apportioned) 
3,475.86 
44.95 
4,823.53 
8.40 



459.00 



1963 
Collections 

194.00 
2,470.75 
81,481.08 

31,244.09 



6,086.00 
60,869.16 
2,025,090.25 
267.18 
192,251.40 



658.15 
460.62 
48.67 
31.12 
1,080.11 



3,708.61 
2,148.97 
3,925.34 
3,015.52 
5,463.19 

11,231.34 
8,182.83 

3,477.64 
44.95 
4,823.53 
8.40 

5,736.20 

1,659.00 



1,659.00 
26.00 



GRAND TOTAL 



$2,457,343.10 



14 



Public Library 



The Trustees are pleased to renort a substantial increase in the service provided by the 
Public Library during 1963. Book circulation continued its rapid growth to reach a new 
high of 61,000, an increase of 11$ over the preceding year. This was due in part to the 
addition of approximately 1,000 new borrowers. The total number of registered borrowers 
is now lj.,300, which represents about one-third of the population. 

It was hoped that the title to the old St. Thomas Church property would be cleared this year 
so that we could expand our facilities, but this problem has not yet been solved. We trust 
that 19614. will find the Library in its new quarters. 

The Trustees are most appreciative of the generous support given to the Library by the 
Literature Committee of the Wilmington Women's Club. Among their activities was the Open 
House held at the Library to mark the commencement of National Library Week in April. At 
this time they presented a record player for the enjoyment of the children who attend the 
Story Hours. In October they sponsored a successful book sale to raise money for the bene- 
fit of the Library, and they are also responsible for maintaining our attractive window 
boxes. 

We also wish to extend our thanks to the Jeycee-ettes who presented fifteen books of current 
fiction. 



The resignation from the Board of Mrs. Marjorie Emery was received with regret. Her contri- 
butions in effort and enthusiasm were invaluable. We welcome Dr. Ernest Wallent, who was 
appointed as her successor. 



To the Staff, the Trustees express gratitude for their loyalty and hard-working support. 

LIBRARIAN'S REPORT 

Books added to the Library 2,307 

Records added 58 

Books circulated: Library 6l,06ij. 

Bookmobile Q£ 6<£5""V i4-»78l 

Records circulated 8J4.O - ' ' T 

New borrowers 958 

Fines collected $1,397.79 

The year 1963 showed an increase of 6,l8l in the circulation of books, records, and periodi- 
cals at the Library and of 725 from the Bookmobile. 

Collections of books were sent to the Boutwell and Wildwood Schools for circulation. The 
Glen Road School is served by the State Bookmobile. 

The Story Hour for pre-school children continues to be a popular service. We are most 
grateful to Mrs. Theodore McKie, Mrs. Bruce MacDonald, and Mrs. Chester Tompkins who so ably 
and faithfully carry on this work. 

There is urgent need for more material, especially in the field of science and technology; 
but, until such time as more space is available, it is impossible to meet the demand for 
these and other services. 



15 



Town Councel 



.0 

1j 





E 

V: 



In accordance with the requirements of the Town By-laws, I submit herewith my 
report as Town Counsel covering the year 1963» 

A. On January 1, 1963, there were pending the following actions by or against 
the Town (exclusive of actions in which the Town was merely summoned as trustee, and in 
which it had no interest, and of tax lien foreclosure proceedings in the Land Court): 

City of Lowell v. Town of Wilmington, District Court of Lowell . (Action of 
contract by City of Lowell to recover the sum of $275*96 for special vocational training 
of certain pupils.) 

City of Lowell v. Town of Wilmington, District Court of Lowell . (Action of 
contract by City of Lowell to recover $657.77 plus interest for aid furnished in a public 
welfare case . ) 

City of Lowell v. Town of Wilmington, District Court of Lowell . (Action of 
contract by City of Lowell to recover $721.90 for aid furnished in a public welfare case.) 

Town of Wilmington v. A Certain Defendant, Fourth District Court of Eastern 
Middlesex . (Action of contract under G. L. Chap. 117, Sec. 5J 

Jacob Levine & Sons v. Town of Wilmington, FourthDistrict Court of Eastern 
Middlesex . (Action of contract to recover burial expense.) 

Town of Wilmington v. Edward N. Gadsby et als, Commissioners of Department of 
Public UtiTTties and Boston and Maine Railroad Company, Supreme Judicial Court, Suffolk 
County i (Petition to review certain rulings and orders of the Department of Public 
Utilities in connection with protection at the Middlesex Avenue Grade Crossing of the 
Boston and Maine Railroad. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. Julia Godzyk, Administratrix of the Estate of Andrew 
Klebasz, Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex ^ (Action of contract to recover 
amounts expended by the Town for support and hospital treatment of decedent.) 

Town of Wilmington v. Wendell Phillips, Middlesex Probate Court. Removed to 
Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex . (Petition to enforce obligation to support . j 

Town of Wilmington v. Irving L. White, Middlesex Probate Court . (Petition to 
enforce obligation to support.,) 

Wilmington Board of Health v. Nagel Stone, Middlesex Superior Court . (Bill in 
equity to enjoin occupancy of substandard dwelling. j) 

New England Gas Products Inc. v. Board of Appeal, Middlesex Superior Court . 
(Three separate appeals from refusal of building permit. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Middlesex Superior Court . 
(Petition for assessment of damages for taking for state highway.) 

Town of Wilmington v. Stephen P. Hathaway et als, Middlesex Superior Court . 
(Bill in equity to enjoin removal of sand end gravel.) 



16 



Town of Wilmington v. William Baldwin et als, Middlesex Superior Court , 
(Bill in equity to enjoin removal of sand and gravel.) 

Town of Wilmington v. Commonwealth of Massachusetts , Middlesex Superior Court , 
(Petition for assessment of damages for land taking,) 

John J. and Mary T, Haye3 v. County of Middlesex, Middlesex Superior Court . 
(Petition for assessment of damages for land taking. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. Allick Epstein, FourthDistrict Court of Eastern Middlesex . 
( Proceeding to enforce obligation to support.) 

Town of Wilmington v. Citizens Trust Co., Middlesex Superior Court . (Action to 
recover deposit securing bid for kitchen equipment at new North School.) 

Minot Anderson et al v. Louis E. Gage et als, Board of Appeals, Middlesex 
Superior Court , (Appeal from decision of the Board of Appeals denying application for 
variance . ) 

Bessie Cohen, d/b/a William Grain Co. v. Board of Appeals, Middlesex Superior 
Sourt . (Appeal from denial by Board of Appeal of application for variance.) 

Town of Wilmington v. Arthur Hatton, Fourth District Court of Epstern Middlesex . 
(Action to recover damages to fire truck.) Up to date defendant has not been served 
owing to the fact that his whereabouts are unknown. 

Town of Wilmington y. Fidelity & Deposit Co, of Maryland and Anthony S ignore , 
Suffolk Superior Court , (Action to recover on bond for completion of streets in sub- 
iivis ion. ) 

Arthur R. Smith et al v. County of Middlesex, Middlesex Superior Court . (Peti- 
tion for damages for land taking. Town admitted as a party defendant on motion,) 

John J. Pyne et al v. County of Middlesex, Middlesex Superior Court . (Petition 
for damages for land taking. Town admitted as a party defendant on motion. ) 

John J. Nitchle et al v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court . (Petition 
for damages for land taking, ) 

Beatrice G. Swenson v. Town of Wilmington et al, Middlesex Superior Court , 
(Petition for damages for land taking.) 

Lillian M. Gplvin y. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court . (Petition 
for damages for land taking.) 

Richard Donahue v. Town of Wilmington et al, FourthDistrict Court of Eastern 
Middlesex . (Action to recover damages for blasting.) 

Sydney E. Graves, Administrator, v. Town of Wilmington et al, Middlesex Superior 
3ourt , (Action to recover damages for death.) 

Paul N. Carpenter v. Town of Wilmington et al, Middlesex Superior Court . (Action 
to recover for damages to property from fire.) 

Minot J, Anderson et ux v. Town of Wilmington, Land Court , (Petition to invali- 
iate zoning by-law. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. Joseph DeCota, Jr. Fourth District Court of Eastern 
Middle sex . (Proceeding to enforce obligation to support.) 



17 



L 

k. 
.0 

'.J 

3 

3 



B. (1) During the year 1963, the following new action was brought by or on be- 
half of the Town: 

Town of Wilmington v. Edward C. Cole, Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex 

(Action to recover damage to water hydrant.) 

B. (2) During the year 1963, the following new actions were brought egainst 
the Town or its officers or agents: 

Albert P. Rounds et al, Trustees v. Harold E. Melzer et al, Board of Water and 
Sewer Commissioners of Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court , (Petition for writ 
of mandamus . ) 

Albert P. Rounds v. Harold E. Melzar, Middlesex Superior Court , (Action of tort 
for interference with contract rights, ) 

Albert P. Rounds v, Waldo A. Stevens, Middlesex Superior Court , (Action of tort 
for interference with contract rights.) 

Albert P. Rounds v. Arnold C. Blake, Middlesex Superior Court , (Action of tort 
for interference with contract rights.) 

Jackson Brothers, Inc. v. Town of Wilmington, Land Court, (Petition for regis- 
tration of land, ) 

Henry E. Brooks v. County of Middlesex, Middlesex Superior Court . (Petition for 
assessment of damages for land taking, Ballardvale Street. ) 

Patsy Spinosa v. County of Middlesex - Town, Middlesex Superior Court . (Petitic 
for assessment of damages for land taking.) 

Salvatore Spinosa, Jr., Exec, v. County of Middlesex and Town, Middlesex Superio 
Court , ( Petition for assessment of damages for land taking,) 

Massachusetts General Hospital v. Town of Wilmington, Third District Court of 
Eastern Middlesex , (Action to recover $762. 90 for hospital care.) 

C, During the year 19&3, * ne following actions by or against the Town were 
finally disposed of: 

Town of Wilmington v. Fidelity & Deposit Company of Maryland and Anthony Signore 
Suffolk Superior Court . (Disposed of by Agreement for Judgment for $5000,00 in favor of 
Town. ) 

Town of Wilmington v. Allick Epstein, Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex 
(Settled by agreement with Epstein to assume full responsibility for support.) 

William G. O'Leary et al v. County of Middlesex, Middlesex Superior Court , 
(Settled by Agreement for $1000.00 in favor of O'Leary.) 

Arthur R. Smith et al v. County of Middlesex, Middlesex Superior Court . (Motior 
for new trial denied. Verdict for plaintiff of $2700.00) 

John J. Pyne et al v. County of Middlesex, Middlesex Superior Court , (Disposed 
of by settlement for $1000.00 in favor of Pyne.) 

Massachusetts General Hospital v. Town of Wilmington, Third District Court of 
Eastern Middlesex . (Settled by Agreement for $339.36 paid to Plaintiff.) 

Town of Wilmington v. Edward N. Gadsby et als, Commissioners of Department of 
Public Utilities and Boston and Maine Railroad Company, Supreme Judicial Court, Suffolk 
County . (Dismissed December 10, 1963.) 



18 



D. Compensation was received by the 
other matters during the year, as follows: 

Compensation $3250.00, less discount 
to appropriations 

Disbursements 



(The above amounts were entirely on account of 
the calendar year 1962.) 



Town Counsel in said matters and in all 



of $81.37, to conform 

$3,168.63 



$3,500.00 

services rendered and disbursements paid in 



Respectfully submitted, 

Philip B. Buzzell 
Town Counsel 



Sarah D. J. Carter Lecture Fund 



"Secrets of the Underwater World" were revealed to a large, attentive audience at the 
Herbert C. Barrows Auditorium on April 27, 1963 when the Carter Lecture Committee presented 
Dr. Dimitri Ribicoff, noted European underwater expert. Dr. Ribicoff is Director of the 
Undersea Research Institute at Cannes, France, and is the inventor of the equipment used 
for underwater photography today. His breathtaking views of deep-sea life and his thought- 
provoking comments about it gave his audience a greater insight into this vast new frontier 
and its importance both nationally and internationally. 

With high anticipation, the Committee looks forward to this year% program - a unique per- 
formance by America's Dynamic "Llords International", a marionette concert theatre for 
adults. The date is April 25th. 

These programs are offered free of charge to the people of Wilmington through the generosity 
of the late Sarah D. J. Carter, and the Committee extends a cordial invitation to all to 
attend. 



Treasurer's Report 



Rece ipts 

Cash on hand l/l/63 
Received from Town Treas. 
Interest 



Cash on hand I/I/6I4. 



$ 96.08 
307.00 
5.86 

&08.91J. 
101.914- 



Expenditures 

Howard Higgins 
Janitor 
Projectionist 
Advertising - Town Crier, 
posters 

Police 



$250.00 
10.00 

5.oo 

37.00 
5.00 

$307.00 



19 



Police Department 



ARREST 



Assault and Battery 


16 


Indecent Assault of Child Under 




Assault and Battery with a Dangerous 




Fourteen 


1 


Weapon 


2 


Indecent Exposure 


2 


Assault and Battery on a Police 




Kidnapping 


2 


Officer 


1 


Larceny 


28 


Accessory Before the Fact (Armed 




Larceny from Railroad Car 


1 


Robbery ) 


1 


Lascivious Cohabitation and Lewdness 


2 


Accosting 


1 


Malicious Damage 


18 


ajl i ray 


c. 


Murder 


d 


Arson 


1 


Non-Support 


33 


A.W.O.L. (Military) 


1 


Non-Payment of Wages 


1 


Breaking and Entering 


16 


Obscene Language 


1 


Breaking Glass on Roadway 


3 


Operating a Dump Without a Permit 


2 


Bribery of a Police Officer 


1 


Rape 


1 


Concealed Weapon 


2 


Receiving Stolen Property 


1 


Contributing to the Delinquency of 




Robbery 


k 


a Minor 


5 


Runaways 


5 


Disturbing the Peace 


2 


Spillage 


l 


Drunkenness 


105 


Stubborn Child 


6 


Escapees 


2 


Suspicious Persons 


60 


False Alarms 


2 


Trespassing 


1 


Forgery and Uttering 


1 


Unlawful Possession of BB Gun 


2 


Fugitive from Justice 


1 


Unlicensed Dogs 


22 


Illegitimacy 


2 


Violation of Hunting Laws 


1 






Warrant Arrest (Other Departments) 


15 


ARREST FOR 


MOTOR 


VEHICLE VIOLATIONS 





Auto Thefts 13 

Allowing Improper Person to Operate 2 

Attaching Plates (Improper) 2 

Operating So As To Endanger 7 
Failing to Display Proper Inspection 

Sticker 16 
Failing to Stop on Signal of Police 

Officer 3 

Failing to Stop for Red Light 1 

Failing to Stop at Stop Sign l\. 



Leaving the Scene of an Accident 
Operating Under the Influence of 
Liquor 

Operating After Suspension of License 
Operating Without a License 
Operating Without Registration 
Operating Uninsured Motor Vehicle 
Operating Unregistered Motor Vehicle 
Operating at Excessive Speed 
Traffic Island Violation 



16 

Ik 
1 

k 
9 
31 
1 



Total Persons Arrested 
Total Fines Assessed 



522 

$ 2,214.5.00 



20 



MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS 



Automobile Accidents 


307 


Juvenile Cases (No Court Action) 


55 


Attempted Suicides 


k 


Larcenies Reported 


161 


Automobiles Stolen 


16 


Malicious Damages Investigated 


152 


Buildings Broken Into 


On 

oO 


Missing Persons Reported 


38 


Buildings Pound Open (Night Check) 


156 


Prowlers Reported 


53 


Children Reported Lost 


20 


Stolen Bicycles 


27 


Complaints Received (Investigated) 


10^2 


Stolen Cars Recovered 


20 


Emergency Trips with Cruisers 




Sudden Deaths Investigated 


18 


Fatal Automobile Accidents 




Summons Delivered 


625 


Fires Responded To 


$ 


Suspended Licenses (Registry Action) 


30 


Houses Checked (Vacations) 




Suspended Registrations (Registry 




Indecent Exposures Reported 


11 


Action) 


13 



This just about covers the activities of this department for the year 1963* For anyone Just 
to read these as they appear in the Annual Town Report - all they will see in print will be 
a list of crimes, and how many we had of each. This, in a sense, is like watching TV where 
you see the finished product, but never get to see what goes on behind the scenes to make 
this possible. Two murders in Wilmington in 1963 were solved; and the finding of a young 
woman's body off Route 93 was solved. The armed invasion of a home by two gunmen (the 
occupants placed in fear) was solved. Many other crimes were investigated - some solved - 
some still unsolved; all of them are receiving our very best attention. 

It is with this in mind that I wish to conclude my report by expressing my most sincere 
thanks to all the members of the Department for their wonderful devotion to duty and their 
accomplishments. To the Women Traffic Supervisors, heartfelt thanks for your devotion to 
duty and for a "Job Well Done". To the Town Departments and the employees of the respec- 
tive departments, thanks for their continued cooperation To those of the Town Government 

who have been gracious and cooperative. 



Dog Officer 



Dog Licenses 1308 

Kennels 

Dogs Confined 298 

Complaints Covered 587 

Dogs Disposed Of 2I4.I 

Dogs Killed by Cars 76 

Resident Calls for Licenses 39^ 



21 



Water & D Sewer Department 



Water Supply ; 

During 1963 substantially more water was pumped than in any previous year. The capacity oJ 
the system was overtaxed, resulting in the imposition of water use restrictions during the 
dry period. It is obvious that the Town's present facilities are inadequate, and new 
facilities must be provided in 19614.. Serious consideration should be given again by the 
Town to the use of Town Park as a wellfield. Through the efforts of the Town Manager, the 
St8te Department of Public Health has agreed to the continued use of the Town Park as a 
ball field provided certain requirements are met. These requirements will add some addi- 
tional cost to the project; however, the price is small for an additional water supply of 
approximately 500,000 gallons per day. 

For the long run water supply needs of the Town, the Water Commissioners have contracted 
with an engineering firm to test the entire area of the Town under a loan from the Federal 
Government. Results of this program will be made available in 1961) so that the Town will 
be in a position to reserve land areas for future water supply requirements, 

A review of the pumping statistics below indicates that further development of wellfields 
and pumping stations is necessary in order to provide for the constantly increasing demand, 

y 1959 I960 1961 1962 1963 

ft ! 

q Maximum gallons 

■j pumped per Day 2,089,100 2,214.6,300 2,355,000 3,256,500 3,6ij.8,000 
Maximum gallons 

pumped per Week Hj., 116, 700 13,213,000 15,850,600 18,851,300 20,757,000 
Maximum gallons 

pumped per Month 56,9^8,300 lj.8,168,900 59,703,1+00 61;., 982, 900 76,91+7,000 

1 Average gallons 

pumped per Day 1,590,785 1,14.20,000 1,514-6, 21+3 1,821,733 2,000,101; 

Average gallons 

pumped per Month 14.8,386,14.22 14.3,278,200 14-7,031,558 55,14-11,058 60,836,14.83 

*> 

Total gallons 

pumped per Year 580,637,300 519,387,200 56I4., 378, 700 66l4.,932,700 730,037,800 



Miscellaneous Information: 



Metered Services 3,339 

Unmetered Services Sh 

Total 3,393 

New Hydrants Installed 11 

New Services Installed I6I4. 

New Meters Installed 165 



22 



Water Main Extensions : 

The following installations were made: 

Under the Betterment Program : 

Street 

Main Street 
Fanueil Drive 



10" Main 
2,169' 



6" Main 



U31 



Sewer : 

Seven sewer connections were made in 1963, bringing the total to twelve (12). 



Fire Department 



The manual force consists of the Chief, three Lieutenants, and fifteen Privates. There is 
a call force of fifteen members. 

The Fire Department responded to a total of nine hundred and eighty (980) calls: one 
hundred and thirty seven (137) were bell alarms, and eight hundred and forty-three ( 8J+3 ) 
were still alarms. 



Ambulance Calls 
Auto and Trucks 
Boats 
Buildings 
Brush and grass 



371 
2 

362 



Chimney 
False Alarms 
Oil Burners 
Out of Towns 
Service Calls 



1 

50 
6 

14 

85 



A total of 116.200 feet of fire hose was laid: 67,900 feet of booster hose ... .20,750 feet 
of 1 1/8" hose.... 15, 550 feet of 1 l/2" hose.... and 13,000 feet of 2 1/2" hose. The total 
value of property endangered was $l,572,l|.20.00. The property loss was $118,379.57» 

As required by the State, inspections were made of rest homes, schools, all public build- 
ings, and all gasoline tank locations. 

With the exception of Engine #5 and the Ambulance, all equipment is in good condition. 

Members of the department installed approximately three miles of fire alarm wire on the 
following streets; Gowing Road, High Street, School Street to Drury Lane; and Loumac Road, 



Permits issued for blasting 
Permits issued for gas 
Permits issued for oil 



23 
78 
142 



23 



Town Engineer 



As mentioned in the 1962 Annual Report, the demand for the services of the Engineering 
Department occasioned by the growth of the Town continued to be heavy during the year. Due 
to this condition and also the fact that the department was working under a limited budget, 
it was not possible to keep the personnel required to take care of all the work from the 
other departments, and some had to be done by consulting engineers and private surveyors. 

Surveys were made and plans were prepared for four streets to be built under the Bettermen 
Act. These included Cedar Crest Road, Reading Avenue, Dadant Drive, and the extension of 
Linda Road. Reading Avenue was turned down as being too costly. 

A survey was made and a traverse run to continue to extend the Massachusetts Co-ordinate 
System to the south portion of the Town and also to establish the exact location of the 
Wilmington-Woburn town line in the field. Another purpose of establishing the location of 
this line was the necessity of obtaining a starting point for the staking out of a large 
parcel of land bordering on the Wilmington-Woburn town line on the west side of Main Street 
Calculations are being made to establish the boundaries of this parcel of land in the field 
as soon as weather permits. 

Other surveys performed during the year include a portion of Clark Street between Middlesex 
Avenue and the railroad for the purpose of eliminating a sharp curve; laying out a pedway 
between Federal Street and the Wildwood Street School; and giving grades for a sidewalk on 
the west side of Main Street from Shawsheen Avenue to the Wilmington-Tewksbury town line. 

The active subdivisions during the year inolude Jackson Heights (off Shawsheen Avenue), 
Hathaway Acres Extension (off Gunderson Road), Esquire Estates (off Marie Drive), Alderwood 
Estates (off Woburn Street), Ferguson Subdivision (off Lowell Street), and the Signore 
Development (off Salem Street). It is significant that a compromise agreement was reached 
between the town and the bonding company in the Signore Subdivision. The facts and agree- 
ments made while this subdivision was active a few years ago were so confused that it was 
deemed advisable to accept an offer of $5,000, or $0% of the bonded amount, to release all 
the involved parties and open the door for a subdivider to resume the building of houses in 
that area. As stated above, this subdivision has become active once again. 

Drainage problems were given serious consideration this year and easements were obtained 
when necessary, and estimated costs were made in an effort to obtain the necessary funds 
to relieve these situations. Several areas where problems existed have been taken care of 
when it was found that funds were available to do the work. No gravel operations took 
place during the year. 



2k 



Highway Department 



As in the past, all regular routine work was completed before my general highway maintenance 
and construction began. Routine work consisted of cleaning catch basins and culverts, 
patching holes and sweeping. 

The pedway from Federal Street to the rear of the wildwood School was constructed, two large 
culverts installed, and surfaced with hot top. The finish top course should be laid in 
1961;. The sidewalk along School Street to the Buzzell School was constructed and hot topped 
162 feet of bituminous curb was laid to control the water and eliminate any washouts, seed- 
ing strip was loamed and the back of the sidewalk graded; all the wild growing shrubs in 
front of the school were removed except those close to the building. The entire area in 
front of this school will be loamed and seeded in the spring by the School Grounds 
Maintenance Department. A large area in back of the Swain School was hot topped to elimin- 
ate surface water from seeping into the cellar; a narrow area was laid around the Center 
School for the same purpose; a large area in back of the High School in the teachers' park- 
ing area was hot topped to eliminate large water puddles and surface cracks. 

One catch basin had to be rebuilt because it caved in Several sections of sidewalk 

patched Two serious water puddles on Woburn Street eliminated with hot top. ... .Sidewalk 

along Middlesex Avenue to Salem Street and along Salem Street to the first driveway at the 

North School completed Hot top and curbing laid Two catch basins and eighty feet of 

pipe laid All damage to lawns, driveways and walks repaired to the satisfaction of the 

property owners Spent two and one-half weeks with the entire crew and trucks in a Town 

clean-up campaign Many street signs and traffic signs erected Installed a new steel 

beam guard rail fence at the Nichols Street R. R. bridge Graveled two streets in the 

cemetery in preparation for hot top Installed three catch basins, one manhole and 150 

feet of pipe to eliminate a serious water condition. 

Completed construction and surface -treated the lower end of Marjorie Road. ... .Relocated the 

corner of Brand Avenue and Baker Street Completed construction and surfaces-treated the 

lower end of Baker Street Completed construction and surface-treated the lower end of 

Lloyd Road. ... .Completed reconstruction of Massachusetts Avenue; due to the laying of a 
water main, the street was severely damaged and the only way to repair it was to rebuild it; 
all materials used were paid for by the Water Department under the Betterment Act; the 
Highway Department absorbed $35>0 # which was a little less than the difference between 

asphalt and pea gravel finish and hot top Pershing Street reconstructed and surfaced.... 

Graveled sidewalk on Main Street from Tewksbury Town Line to Shawsheen Avenue bridge; same 
was hot topped by the New England Tel. & TeL after laying their lines. 

Betterments : 



Butters Row : Completed the reconstruction and surfacing. About one third had to be re- 
built. This section is very narrow and in the course of laying a water main (because of 
ledge and boulders) the street was actually destroyed. The balance required trench 
graveling and rolling. The entire length had to be surfaced. All materials were paid for 
by the Water Department under the Betterment Act. 

Dorchester Street ; Reconstructed in two sections, trench graveled, brought up to grade, 
and surfaced. All materials were paid for by the Water Department under the Betterment Act. 



2$ 



Hamlin Lane : Approved for construction in 1962; finally got underway in November 1963. 
(Delay caused by our inability to procure a release for drainage. ) Late in October 1963, 
we finally obtained it from John D. Cooke. This left very little time for construction, 
but I did manage to do the excavation, install the drainage and gravel the entire street 
before the exceptionally early winter set in. 

Cedar Crest Poad ; This street was approved at a Special Town Meeting. A serious water 
problem existed and again a very long delay in procuring a release for drainage. While 
waiting for the easement, I installed the catch basins and pipe lines and did some of the 
excavation where needed. Had to shut the job down, as I had no outlet for the drainage 
system. One property owner agreed to give the Town the easement required under certain 
conditions. After talking it over with the Town Manager, we agreed to his conditions and 
received the easement, after which I proceeded to construct the street. I managed to 
finish the street and hot top it, plus all driveways. I still have the sidewalks to build 
and the curbing to lay. Some lawns will have to be loamed to match the sidewalk. This 
street will be completed early in 1961).. 

Streets approved for construction under the Betterment Act in 1962, namely River Street, 
Pleasant Street^'and Marcia Road, were completed as to specifications early in the spring. 
All property damages were repaired to the satisfaction of the property owners; same re- 
ported to the Board of Selectmen and the Town Manager in writing with a complete breakdown 
on each street for materials, equipment hired, and labor, so as to obtain the actual cost 
per front foot for each property owner. 

Chapter 90 Maintenance ; 

All catch basins, culverts, and gutters cleaned. Forty-five hundred feet of Burlington 
Avenue was surfaced with tar and pea gravel. Part of Splem Street, at the junction of 
Middlesex Avenue was hot topped. The balance was completed under Chapter 8l. 

Chapter 90 Construction ; 

Construction of Ballardvale Street started late because of the delay in procuring easements 
from the various property owners. The street was relocated twice and grades lowered be- 
cause of the high powered electric lines. The DPW demands a set number of feet clearance 
under the power lines. Because of this, the yardage excavation of subsoil, rock, and ledge 
was greatly increased, plus added drainage. The late heavy rains hampered the installation 
of a large 70 foot culvert. However, I did manage to get the first 1100 feet ready for 
hot top, but could not lay it because the utility poles were not moved. Work had to be 
stopped because of poor weather conditions. Construction will continue in 1 961+. and 1965* 

Chapter 81 ; 

Catch basins and culverts on all streets were cleaned at least twice. Many streets were 
swept with a power sweeper, and the sand picked up. A drainage problem at the corner of 
Harris Street and Burlington Avenue was eliminated by the installation of two catch basins, 
one manhole, and 160 feet of pipe. Also eliminated a drainage problem at the corner of 
School Street and Middlesex Avenue by laying 200 feet of pipe. Finished hot topping the 
rotary at the junction of Salem Street and Middlesex Avenue. 

The following streets were surface-treated, all or in part, with Chapter 81 and general 
funds : 



Baker Street 


700 


ft. 


Gowing Road 


1200 ft. 


Beacon Street 


1050 


ft. 


Gunderson Road 


k60 ft. 


Brand Avenue 


1800 


ft. 


Harnden Street 


850 ft. 


Brattle Street 


700 


ft. 


Hathaway Road 


1850 ft. 


Burlington Avenue 


600 


ft. 


Hobson Avenue 


1800 ft. 


Clark Street 


650 


ft. 


Lake Street 


1050 ft. 


Columbia Street 


1080 


ft. 


Ledgewood Road 


350 ft. 


Congress Street 


1800 


ft. 


Marcus Road 


2300 ft. 


Federal Street 


1000 


ft. 


Marion Street 


1800 ft. 



26 



List of streets repaired and surface-treated (continued): 



Oakridge Circle 
Pershing Street 
Pilling Road 
Rollins Road 
S ha wane en Avenue 



1800 ft. 

850 ft. 

kSo ft. 

300 ft. 
3200 ft. 



South Street 
Veranda Avenue 
Westdale Avenue 
Wildwood Street 
Woburn Street 



700 ft. 
1080 ft. 
1200 ft. 
3^00 ft. 
7500 ft. 



Snow Removal and Ice Control : 

This is a problem at best. The demands made of the Department by the townspeople are for- 
ever increasing and at times seem impossible, but so far we have managed to keep up with 
them. The solution is simple, but very costly. It means more equipment must be hired to 
do a fast clean job. Before the plowing is finished, at least two town trucks must be 
diverted from plowing to sanding. To make the job more difficult, some people insist on 
parking their cars in the street, regardless of the pleadings of many radio stations, plus 
the fact that the Town has an Ordinance forbidding it. This was published in the Town 
Crier back in December of 1 Q 63. Many of our citizens have disregarded it, even though they 
know there is a towing penalty charge. All the Department is requesting is cooperation, 
and we will do our utmost to keep the streets free of snow and ice. 

All Town-owned vehicles are maintained and repaired at the Highway garage. The only cost to 
the various departments is parts and tires. 

At this writing, the Department has one new 1961j. Dodge truck. The rest of the equipment is 
in good condition, even though some of it is old. However, some should be replaced while 
there is a reasonable trade-in value. 

At this time, I would like to thank the various departments for any and all assistance they 
have given me, especially the Water Department for allowing one of their men, a very capable 
welder, to come over to my garage and do the welding. I would also like to thank the Board 
of Selectmen and Town Manager for their cooperation and understanding in trying to solve the 
various problems with which we are confronted. 



Sealer of Weights & Measures 



The list of measuring devices and measuring weights adjusted and sealed during the year 
1963 is as follows : 



Large scales 

Scales under 100 lbs. 

Taximeters 

Vehicle tanks 

Grease & Oil pumps 

Gasoline pumps 



No. adjusted 

1 

7 



12 

20 



No. sealed 

7 
20 

1 
19 

9 
61 

117 



27 



Tree Department 



Elm Leaf Beetle and Dutch Elm Disease : 

The elm leaf beetle spraying program starts in April and continues into August. This year 
we lost sixty-five elms due to this disease. Over one hundred and twenty samples were sent 
to Amherst State College to be tested, and reports came back that sixty-five were infected, 
At various times, we have been helped by State tree workers and the Wilmington Highway 
Department in the removal and burning of these trees. The State furnished men, trucks, 
and equipment for three weeks at no cost to the town. To alleviate the loss of our elms, 
we have a tree planting program which has been in operation for the past four years. This 
year we planted one hundred and fifty-five (155) maple trees in various sections of the 
town. In years gone by, stumps were left to rot, or they were cut as close to the ground 
as possible, leaving an unsightly mess. Pour years ago we hired a stump cutting machine. 
This machine cuts any size stump two feet below ground level. The hole may then be filled 
with loam leaving a clear area. 

Moth Department : 

All shade trees were sprayed with 6% and 12% D.D.T. for gypsy moth, tent caterpillar, and 
fall web worms, aphids, pine shoot moth, oak blights, maple leafspot and dieback. All 
front lawns were sprayed with 6% D.D.T. for Japanese beetle and Milky disease. In differ- 
ent areas around town, we encountered gypsy moth and tent caterpillar nests. All these 
eggs were treated with creosote. 

Tree Department ; 

During the year 1963* the Tree Department carried on its usual work of tree removal, trim- 
ming low limbs, removing broken limbs, and removing broken tree tops. These trees are 
diseased or dead; therefore they are taken to the town tree dump and burned to prevent 
further infestation of other trees. Our shade tree spraying program was increased this 
year. As was previously reported, some maple trees are being attacked by a disease known 
as dieback or decline. We hope that continued spraying will arrest and eventually wipe ou 
this infection. 

We continued to trim the trees surrounding the fire alarm system which has greatly reduced 
short circuits causing false alarms. These trees will be checked at various times to pre 
vent further trouble. Our tree feeding program was continued this year. Over seventy-fiv 
trees were treated. Our Christmas tree on the Town Common, which has been permanently 
planted, was decorated by this department under the direct supervision of the Tree Warden 
This tree was donated to the Town by the late Herbert C. Barrows. 

Town Forest : 

The Town forest has been cleared of all underbrush, dead trees have been removed and 
dangerous limbs have been cut. The road around the forest has been cleared; also, the bal 
park was sprayed throughout the summer months. 

Poison Ivy : 

Brush Killer was sprayed on stone walls, streets, and around homes where poison ivy was 
found. The roadside was also sprayed with particular notice being given to street corners 
where the motorist's view was obstructed causing an accident hazard. 

Mosquitoes ; 

Home s , s wamp s , and bog areas were sprayed again this year, which is the usual practice of 
this department. We also used rt Toss Its". These are little gelatin bombs which dissolve 
in the water, releasing chemicals which kill the larva of the mosquitoes. During the 
winter months, the bogs and swamps are dusted with a powdered chemical while they are stili 
frozen. When they thaw out in the spring, the chemicals contact the larva. None of the 
chemicals mentioned above are harmful to humans, fish or wildlife. 



28 



Building Inspector 



Building Permits were issued as follows: 

1962 1963 



Dwellings 

Residential Garages 
Alterations and Repairs 
to dwellings 



Industrial Buildings 
Commercial Garages 
Office Buildings 
Utility Buildings 
Public Buildings 
Sheds, Barns, etc. 
Stores 

Structures (towers and signs! 
Additions and alterations to 
non-residential structures 
Elevator 



Schools 

TOTAL 



No. 


Valuation 


No. 


Valuation 


123 
9 


1,592,270 
8,25Q 


155 
13 


2,039,700 
20,550 


58 


, 113,630 
l,7ll».,150 


72 


116.650 
2,176,000 


9 
1 
1 

5 
2 
6 


573,800 
21,500 
1+2,000 

11,550 
1+2,000 
117,250 


12 

1 
1 
1 

5 
7 
3 


500,300 

5,800 
8,000 
85,000 

3,900 
296,150 
3,900 


15 
1 


51,550 
11,500 


8 


65,050 




761,050 


1 


868,100 
500.000 




2,575,200 




3,555,900 



Renewals 27 12 

Demolition 21 15 

Fire Repairs & Replacement 2 1^ 

2H0 310 



Report of fees received and turned over to the Treasurer: 

Building Permits 280 1,221.00 310 1,562.00 

Plumbing Permits 137 1,016.50 169 1,265.00 

Gas Pitting Permits 3 29.00 53 256.00 

Wiring Permits 356 2,131.55 325 1,669.15 

5,397.95 5,652.15 



The duties of the Building Inspector have been performed to the extent possible under the 
appropriations voted and the facilities furnished. 



29 



Board of Appeals 



The Wilmington Board of Appeals respectfully submits its Annual Report for the year 1963. 
The Board consists of Louis E. Gage (LG), Chairman; Bruce MacDonald (BM), Secretary; 
Parker E. Hodgdon (PH), Member; and Associate Members, Ernest W. Jamison (EJ) and 
Lloyd C. Bender, III (LB). 

The Board reports that all but one of the cases for 1963 have been completed, and that all 
oases heard since the present zoning law was adopted have been processed and placed in a 
master file under assessors map and parcel numbers. 

Following is the report of cases heard in 1963, the members voting, and the decision on 
each: 



Hearing Date 
(Advertised dates) 
Applioant 



Case #1-63 
January 15, 
(12/27/62 & 

1/3/63) 
AVCO RAD 



1963 



Case #2-6^ 
February 12, 1963 
(lM/63 & 
1/31/63 
Elmer 9c Marion Woller 



Case #3-6? 
February 12, 1963 
(lM/63 & 
1/31/63) 
John Bene vent o 



Reason for Appeal 



For authorization under Section 
VIII-2-B of the Zoning By-law to 
erect two steel test towers 
70 feet high at 201 Lowell Street 
(Map 14.8/7 3A) 



To erect a dwelling on Lots 28 
and 29, Carter Street, having 
sufficient frontage and area, 
but insufficient depth according 
to Zoning By-law. 
(Map 55/207) 



For authorization to build and 

operate a bituminous concrete 

paving plant, permission for same 

having been refused by Building 

Inspector. 

(Map Rl-27 & 28) 



Members 
Voting 



(LG, PH, BM) 



Decision 



Granted 



(LG, PH, BM) 



Granted 



(LG, HC, BM) 



Granted 



Case 
March 




963 

(2/U»y 
2/21/63) 
Anthony J. Triglione 
Suppliers Automotive 
Parts Co. 



Authorization for two signs, 
V x 6«; the other 3' x 18') 



(one 
on 

an existing building in a General 
Business zone. 
(Map I4.2/3O) 



(LG, PH, WC) 



Granted 



Case #5-63 
March 5, 1.963 
(2/14/63 & 

2/21/63) 
Frank F. and Marjorie 

Stevens 



To erect a single dwelling on 
Lot 3A, Federal Street, having 
sufficient depth and area but 
insufficient frontage. 
(Map 65/21CJ 



(LG, PH, WC) 



Granted 



30 



Hearing Date 
(Advertised dates) 
Applicant 

Case #6-63 
March 5, 196 3 

(2/1^/63 & 

2/21/63) 
James L. and Mary S. 

McLaughlin 

Case #7-63 
March 12, 196 3 
(2/21/63 & 
2/28/63) 
William P. Butt 

Case #8-63 
Maroh 12, 196 3 
(2/12/63 & 
2/28/63 
Clement Napolitano 



Case #9-63 
April 2, 1963 
(3/21/63 & 
3/28/63 
Elsie Cross 

Case #10-63 
April 2, 1963 
(3/21/63 & 
3/28/63) 
Minot J. Anderson 



Case #11-63 
April 2, 1963 
(3/21/63 tc 
3/28/63) 
Philip Komenohuk 

Case #12-63 
April 23, 1963 
(UA/63 & 
1^/11/63) 
George O. Tzannos 



Case #13-63 
April £5, 1963 

J+/H/63) 
Warren & Nancy 
Anderson 

Case #lU-63 
April 3, 1963 
(LA/63 * 

i^/ll/63) 
I. E. Engineering, 

Ine. 



Reason for Appeal 



To open a real estate office and 
grocery store at corner of 
Shawsheen Ave. and Hopkins St., 
in SRA zone. 
(Map 22/8) 



To erect homes on lots on Woburn 
St. having sufficient frontage 
and area, but insufficient depth. 
(Map 86/14 & 15) 



Members 
Voting 

(LG, PH, WC) 



Decision 



(LG, PH, BM) 



For a variance of sideyard require- (LG, PH, BM) 
ments, 22 instead of 25 feet, for 
a dwelling to be built at 290 
Shawsheen Avenue. 
(Map 22/8A) 



To replace existing front porch 
extending into required front 
yard at this location. 
(Map 1*5/36) 



To erect a dwelling on Lot 5» 
Andover Street, lot having re- 
quired frontage and area, but 
insufficient depth. 
(Map 103/15) 



For temporary use of a trailer as 
a dwelling while he rebuilds his 
home, destroyed by fire. 
(Map 7/66) 



To build two homes on Lots 11A & 
12A Marcus Road; the first with 
insufficient depth and the seoond 
with insufficient frontage. 
(Map 92/18) 



To erect a dwelling on Lot 30-63 
Hillcrest Road, not having re- 

?uired frontage, depth nor area. 
Map 30/63) 



To erect a recreational building 
with 116' x 66' unobstructed 
floor on shallow lot with 15' 
front yard depth. 
(Map 1*2/22) 



(LG, PH, BM) 



(LG, PH, BM) 



(LG, PH, BM) 



(LG, PH, BM) 



(LG, PH, BM) 



(LG, PH, BM) 



Permit granted 
for either store 
or RE office 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Denied 



31 



Hearing Date 
(Advertised dates) 
Applicant 

Case #15-63 
April 23, 1963 
(4/4/63 & 
4/11/63 

Nee Ellsworth Post 

Case #16-63 
May 14, 1963 
(4/25/63 & 
5/2/63) 
John J. Elia 



Reason for Appeal 



For an extension of a non- 
conforming use, in order to im- 
prove the appearance of their 
quarters on Main Street. 
(Map lj.2/22F) 



To allow for 6 signs not to ex- 
oeed 15$ of the face of a building 
now being erected at 38O Middlesex 
Avenue* 

(Map 89/12 & 13) 



Members 
Voting 



(LG, PH, BM) 



(LG, PH, BM) 



Decision 



Granted 



Granted 



Case #17-63 
May 1963 
(4/25/63 & 
5/2/63) 
Henry Mullarky 



Case #18-63 
June 10, 1963 
(5/31/63 & 
6/6/63) 

Wilmington Development property. 
Company (Map 79/31C & E) 



To divide his land into three 
building lots, all having required 
area but none having required 
frontage. 
(Map 79/42) 



For the right to remove and sell, 
out of town, excess loam after 
building construction on its 



Case #19-63 
July 9, 1963 
(6/20/63 & 
6/27/63) 
E. Raymond Allen 

Case #20-63 
July 16, 1%3 
(6/27/63 & 
7/5/63) 
Sidney Rosenthal 



(LG, PH, BM) 



(LG, EJ, BM) 



Case #21-63 
August 6, 1963 
(7/18/63 & 
7/25/63) 
Frank De Marco 



Case #22-63 
August 6, I963 
(7/18/63 & 

7/25/63 
Stevens Family 

Trust 



To allow the addition of a porch 
to his home closer to the lot line 
than permitted. 
(Map 59/1 7B) 



On the appeal of Middlesex Con- 
struction Corp. and Meredith 
Mortgage Corp., Boston, Mass. to 
build on Lots 14 to 19, 23, 37 
and 38, all on Dell Drive; not 
having sufficient frontage and/or 
depth measured according to Section 



(LG, PH, BM) 



Granted with 
restrictions 



Granted 



Granted 



No Hearing 
(Applicant did not appear) 



5, Zoning By-law. 
(Map 17/I7x) 



To allow for the increase of the 
size of a building on a non- 
conforming lot at 253A Middlesex 
Avenue • 
(Map 65/12) 



To allow for the additional 
storage of flamables in a building 
at 845 Woburn Street. 
(Map 37/8) 



(LG, PH, EJ) 



Granted 



(PH, BM, EJ) 



Granted 



32 



Hearing Date 
(Advt. Dates) 
Applicant 

Case #23-6? 
August 6, 1963 
(7/18/63 & 

7/25/63 
Russell & Nadine 

Joseph 

Case #2lj.-63 
August 13, 1963 
(7/25/63 & 
8/1/63) 
Donald & Ruth Kelley 

Case #25-63 
August 13, 1963 
(7/25/63 & 
8/1/63) 
James & Mary Barb as 

Case #26-63 
August 20, 1963 
(8/1/63 & 
8/8/63) 
Manuel Amaro 



Case #27-63 
August 20, 1963 
(8/1/63 & 
8/8/63) 
Manuel Amaro 



Case #28-63 
August 20, 1963 
(8/1/63 & 
8/8/63) 
Walter A. Surrette 

Case #29-63 
August 20, 1963 
(8/1/63 & 
8/8/63) 
Edmund Sparks 



Case #30-63 
August 20, 1963 
(8/1/63 & 
8/8/63) 
Hayden Mica Company 



Reason for Appeal 



To allow the erection of a garage 
on their property closer to the 
lot line than the law allows. 
(Map 96/1) 



Members 
Voting 

(PH, BM, EJ) 



Decision 



Granted 



For the location of a house trailer 
for residential purposes on their 
premises at 33 Fairmeadow Road. 
(Map 36A3) 



To divide their lot so as to leave 
their residence without the re- 
quired frontage. 
(Map 60/25) 



To aggregate Lots H4.5 through H4.8 
(Wilmington Gardens Plan) on 
Cleveland Avenue, and create two 
building lots having more than 
required area, but insufficient 
frontage. 
(Map 7/71) 



To aggregate 21 lots - #lj.30 
through 14.50 (Wilmington Terraoe 
Plan) to make two building lota 
on Norfolk Avenue and Newland 
Avenue, having more than required 
frontage, but insufficient area. 
(Map 32/23) 



To create two building lots having 
more than required area, but in- 
sufficient frontage. 
(Map 79/5) 



To create two building lots for 
sale, not having sufficient front- 
age, depth nor area, fronting on 
Grand Street. 
(Map 31/19) 



To dispose of surplus loam from 
construction work, out of town. 
(Map I4.O/I) 



No Hearing 
(Applicant did not appear) 



(PH, BM, EJ) 



(LG, BM, EJ) 



Denied 



Granted 



(LG, BM, EJ) 



Granted 



(LG, PH, BM) 



(LG, BM, EJ) 



Denied 



Denied 



(LG, PH, BM) 



Granted 



33 



Hearing Date 
(Advt. Dates) 
Applicant 

Case #31-63 
September 3, 1963 
(8/15/63 & 

8/22/63) 
Gaetano & Giacomina 

Oliver! 

Case #32-63 
September 3, 1963 
(8/15/63 & 
8/22/63) 
Jackson Brothers 



Case #33-63 
October 1, 1963 
(9/5/63 & 
9/12/63) 
William Magee 



Case #3l*-63 
October 1, 1963 
(9/5/63 & 
9/12/63) 
H. Edward King 

Case #35-63 
October 22, 1963 
(10/3/63 & 
10/10/63 ) 
William J. Hanlon 



Case #36-63 
October 29, 1%3 
(10/10/63 & 
10/17/63) 



Case #37-63 
November 2b, 1963 
(11/7/63 & 
ll/ll*/63) 
James F. Dawson 



Case #38-63 
December 10, 1963 
(11/21/63 & 
11/29/63) 
McParland & Son, Inc. 



Reason for Appeal 



Members 
Voting 

(LG, PH, BM) 



To combine four lots on Marjorie 
Road into one building lot with 
required frontage but insufficient 
depth and area. 
(Map 55/196) 



For a variance in sideyard re- (LG, PH, BM) 

quirements to have 20 ft. sideyards 
on their existing 100' lots on 
Moore and Manning Streets. 
(Map 22/19) 



Decision 



Granted 



Granted 



For permission to build a home at 
I4.O6 Chestnut Street on a lot 
having less than required frontage 
and depth. 
(Map 1/2) 



To erect a sign for a gift shop on 
property of Demoulas Realty, Inc. 
at 2i<.0 Main Street. 
(Map 14-3/5) 



For a sideyard variance to build 
a garage on his lot nearer to lot 
line than permitted by Schedule 
V-l. 

(Map 8O/8A) 



To have a dwelling on Lot 13, 
Wedgewood Avenue with less than 
required sideyard. 
(Map 21/5-13) 



To create a lot at 65 Glen Road 
having sufficient depth and area 
but insufficient frontage, and 
build a dwelling thereon. 
(Map 67/3D 



To obtain building permits for 
dwellings on lots 13, U*, 15, 16, 
17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 21*, 
25, 26, 27, 31, 33, 31*, 35, 36, 
37, 38, 39, 1*0, 1*1, 1*2, 1*3, kk, 
1*5, 1*6, 1*7, 1*8, 1*9, 50, 51, 52, 
55, 56 , 57 , 59, 60, 61, 63, 61*, 
65, 67, 68, 69, 70, 73, 71* & 75 
in Alderwood Estates, having re- 
quired frontage and area, but in- 
sufficient depth measured according 
to Schedule V-5. (Map 59/17E) 

31* 



(LG, PH, EJ) 



Denied 



(LG, PH, EJ) 



(LG, PH, BM) 



Granted 



Granted 



(LG, PH, BM) 



(LG, PH, BM) 



Granted 



Granted with 
restrictions 



(LG, EJ, BM) 



Granted 



Hearing Date 
(Advt. Dates) 
Applicant 

Case #39-63 
December 10, 1963 
(11/21/63 & 
11/29/63 ) 
Prank E. Protten 



Case #14.0-63 
December 10, 1963 
(11/21/63 & 
11/29/63) 
Thomas 0' Grady 



Case #iq-63 
December 17, 1963 
(11/29/63 & 
12/5/63) 
Robert J. Corey 



Case #i|2-63 
December 17, 1963 
(11/29/63 & 
12/5/63) 
Eugene Weisberg 

Case #14-3-63 
December 17, 1963 
(11/29/63 & 
12/5/63) 
John A. Lucci, Jr. 

Case #1^-63 
December 17, 1963 
(11/29/63 & 
12/5/63) 
Robert E. Jordan 

Case #14.5-63 
December 17, 1963 
(11/29/63 & 
12/5/63) 
Cornelius O'Brien 



Members 

Reason for Appeal Voting Decision 



For dwellings on two lots on (LG, PH, BM) Granted 

Wildwood Street, having required 
frontage and area, but insufficient 
depth according to Section V-5. 
(Map 63/3) 



To erect a dwelling adjacent to (LG, PH, BM) Denied 

29 Main Street on a lot having 
sufficient frontage and area, but 
insufficient depth. 
(Map 55) 



To create a recreation area on Awaiting recommendation 

18 acres plus of land, formerly of Planning Board 

a gravel pit off Salem Street in 
North Wilmington. 
(Map Rl/26) 



To erect a sign for a W. T. Grant (LG, PH, BM) Granted 
Store in Wilmington Plaza, 2I4.O Main 
Street . 
(Map 14.3/5) 



To erect signs on his building 
in a neighborhood business 
district. (211 Lowell Street) 
(Map 57/52) 



(LG, PH, BM) Granted with 

restrictions 



To obtain two building permits (LG, PH, BM) Granted with 

for dwellings on Carter Lane, on restrictions 
lots having required frontage but 
not required depth nor area. 
(Map 32/80) 

To erect a dwelling at the end of (LG, PH, BM) Granted 

Baker Street on a lot of four 

acres not having the required 

frontage. 

(Map 24.5/1}.) 



35 



Cemetery Department 



Cemetery : 

The year began with a heavier than usual death rate. In January, February and March there 
were twenty-seven burials. The most difficult factor at this time was the snow, which had 
a base of approximately six inches of ioe which had to be penetrated before the lot markers 
could be located. At some grave sites, we had a depth of four feet of frost to dig through, 
making it necessary for us to use the Water Department compressor. Cemetery equipment and 
men were called on to work with the Highway Department during snow removal. Each year 
brings regular routine work* In 1963, extra time was spent on perpetual care lots, and 
many sunken graves were filled to level. 

The trao tor-loader which was purchased in 1962 has been very useful in hauling loam and 
gravel for rebuilding old lots and filling sunken graves. We have hauled a lot of fill 
from our own pit on Federal Street for expansion areas which will be loamed for use in 1961^.. 
Many lots and new graves had to be reseeded due to the dry summer. A liquid fertilizer was 
applied this year, but results were not as satisfactory as in previous years when an organio 
fertilizer was used. Approximately seven hundred feet of two-inch cement-lined water pipe 
was installed in the area of the new section. The Water and Highway Departments assisted 
in this operation. The Engineering Department surveyed avenues to be hot topped. Highway 
Department machinery, plus hired equipment was used to haul gravel to grade these roads. 
They were not ready for hot topping this fall but will be finished in the spring of 196Jj.. 

y 

The machines and other equipment of the Cemetery Department are in fairly good condition, 
and are thoroughly overhauled and repaired each spring. Two old mowers have been traded 
for new ones. There is still some need for additional machinery. The need for various 
kinds of machinery, and the housing of the tractor and attachments has crowded our small 
garage. We are definitely in need of an additional building at the cemetery. 



o 
c 

Wilmington residents died in Wilmington 2£ 

< Wilmington residents died elsewhere 35 

Non-residents died in Wilmington 1 

Non-residents 21 

Babies died in Wilmington 1 

1 • Babies died elsewhere 12 

Cremations 1 



96" 



Parka: 

The Town Park was mowed regularly. The five veterans ' parks were mowed, and flowers were 
planted for Memorial Day. Two applications of fertilizer were used on the Town Common. 
The area was mowed regularly and watered until dry weather forced the limitation of water 
used for this purpose. The Silver Lake Beach area was maintained as usual. One hundred 
and thirty tons of sand have been stook-piled on the beaoh. This will be spread about the 
swimming area in the spring of 196lj.. 



36 



School Grounds Maintenance ; 



All school grounds received constant care. An application of fertilizer was used on all 
areas with the High School receiving a second feeding. Watering was done as necessary when 
possible. Due to the dry summer and water shortage, some lawns suffered when sprinkling 
was curtailed by the Water Department. Shrubbery was kept trimmed and weeded; grass was 
mowed and trimmed regularly. The parking lots were swept; sand and debris were hauled away. 
The baseball diamonds were graded with loam and sand. They were rototilled, raked, and 
rolled for school activities and the Pony Leagues. The football area had more loam and 
seed added to it. We are trying to build this field up so that the center will be a little 
higher than the outside, giving us better drainage. The field was lined for four school 
games this year. 

The home team bleachers were painted in an attempt to protect them from the weather. To 
comply with a request from the track coach, the Jumping pits were changed, and new sawdust 
was added to them. The ice at the tennis court and at the Glen Road School was kept cleared 
and maintained for skating. The highway grader was used to grade the cinder track, which 
was then raked and rolled for a new surface. Due to the dry weather, it was necessary to 
reseed the circular lawn at the Welker School. The areas at the sides and rear of the 
building were cut to a grade. Loam was then hauled to the Church Street side. This area 
will be landscaped in the spring of 196ij.. 

In conclusion, I would like to take this opportunity to thank the Town Manager and the 
Board of Selectmen for their cooperation. I would also like to thank all Town Departments, 
especially the Highway Department, for their assistance throughout the year. 



Recreation Commission 



On behalf of the Wilmington Recreation Commission, I herewith submit the annual report for 
the year 1963. 

The Commission continues to offer such programs as summer playground activities for the 
children, protection of life and swimming instruction at the Town Beach, a softball league 
for men, and a winter program of gym activities at various schools. 

A constant increase in attendance at the Town Beach has caused great concern, especially 
during heat waves and prolonged dry spells. Future planning should give this consideration, 
and it possibly will have an effect on the handling of tag identifications of the future. 

A group of volunteer workers, under the direction of Mr. Howard Laf aver, have organized a 
basketball league for boys 12, 13 and lij. years of age. Their games are played Saturday 
afternoons at the high school gym as part of the regular recreation program. 

The inauguration of two new playground areas may be realized this year if authorization 
for the use of the Boutwell and North Intermediate Schools is possible. 

We wish to express our sincere appreciation for the cooperation given by the School 
Committee and the Planning Board. 



37 



School Committee 



To the Citizens of Wilmington: 

In accordance with Chapter 72, Section I4., of the General Laws of the State of Massachusetts, 
the School Committee herewith presents its report for the year 1963. 

The membership of the Committee was as follows: 



The year 1963 again found the Committee deeply involved in matters pertaining to (1) the 
long range school building program, (2) the recruitment and selection of teachers, (3) 
curriculum development and improvement, and prudent budgetary policies and practices in 
the face of rising costs. Your study of the needs and the progress by the School Committee 
and the School Administration in these vital areas of our public school operation is respect 
fully solicited in the pages that follow. 



Scheduled for completion and occupancy by September, 19614., is the new 15 room elementary 
school on Woburn Street in North Wilmington. The 12 rooms of elementary pupils now housed 
in the North Intermediate School will be transferred to the new school, thus permitting the 
latter to be used solely as a Grades 7-8 center for the children in this area of the town. 
It should be noted, however, that for the school year 196i|.-65» an attempt will be made to 
place all Grade seven children in the North Intermediate School. Such a move will not only 
ease the overcrowded situation in the high school, but will also permit these children to 
be in a school where their educational and social needs can be better met. What will happer 
after the 196l|.-65 school year will be determined by what happens in West Wilmington, 

Sometime between 1965 and 1968, two schools will have to be constructed in the West Wilming- 
ton area, if the town is to keep abreast of its long range building program. One is 
scheduled to house Grades 1-6 children; the other Grades 7-8 . It is too early at this 
writing to say which school should be erected first, but it is not too early to acquire the 
sites for them. It is the feeling of the School Committee that the acquisition of these 
two sites represents a minimum requirement; and, if at all possible, the Permanent Building 
Committee should acquire sites in the South Wilmington area in reasonable keeping with the 
recommendations of the "Report of School and Recreation Studies and Capital Budget", pre- 
pared for the Wilmington Planning Board by Economic Development Associates, dated May 31* 196C 

The Committee also feels that if pupil projections permit and overcrowdedness at the high 
school dictates, the Intermediate School should be phased in first in this area of town. 
School use would follow the pattern established for the North Intermediate School, wherein 
for the first few years of its occupancy, the school would house both elementary and 



Term Expires 



Mr, Arthur V. Lynch, Chairman 

Mr. Glen E. Connolly, Vice Chairman 

Mr. Richard E. Keane, Secretary 

Mr. John F. Hartnett 

Mr. Edward F. Page 

Mr. George G. Robertie 



I96Z4. 
1965 
1966 
1966 
1965 
1961+. 



« 



THE SCHOOL BUILDING PROGRAM 



38 




Grades 7-8 students. This would permit the balance of the Grades 7-8 children not housed 
in the North Intermediate School to be taken care of in the new school and, at the same 
time, handle the first crush of elementary children expected in this area in the next few 
years, after which the eventual number of elementary and secondary rooms needed would become 
more clear. It would also relieve the pressure on the high school, which will need all of 
its space for the Grade 9-12 enrollment after 1967. 

Lastly, regarding the long range school building program, the Committee would like to bring 
to the attention of the town the fact that if housing starts continue to stay at 154» as 
was the case this year compared to an average of 112 the previous five years, and our school 
population continues to spurt as it did this year, the 1966 occupancy previously scheduled 
for the West Wilmington area may have to be advanced to 1965. The Permanent Building 
Committee, the School Administration, and your School Committee are all watching this situa- 
tion very carefully, and are prepared to take the necessary steps should the need arise. 



TEACHER SELECTION 

During the past year, twenty-five teachers resigned for the following reasons: 



Matrimony 5 

Maternity 8 

Overseas Teaching Positions 2 

Other Teaching Positions 6 

Armed Service 1 

Counselled Out 1 
Personal and Family 

Responsibilities 2 



The Committee elected nineteen teachers to tenure, appointed thirty-four teachers to fill 
staff vacancies, and approved one emeritus status. The latter was granted to Miss Laura N. 
Marland, beloved and superb teacher in the Wilmington Public Schools for h$ years, and head 
of the English Department for I4.O years. Of the thirty-four staff vacancies filled, twenty- 
five were for replacements, eight for new positions because of growth, and one to improve 
the curriculum. The number of teachers and principals now stands at 175, compared to 166 in 
1962, and to 129 five years ago. 

The Committee made two additions to the existing salary schedule in an attempt to recognize 
advanced training and to strengthen holding power in the professional staff. Effective in 
September of 1961;, the additions, a Master's degree plus thirty hours of training, and a 
Doctor's degree, will become part of the overall salary schedule for teachers. The former 
will call for a minimum-maximum wage of $5,300 - $8,100, and the latter of $5,600 - $8,ij.00. 



CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT AND IMPROVEMENT 

Accomplishments in this critical area of the total instructional program during the past 
vear included major improvements in Reading, English, Mathematics, Special Education, 
Science, and steady, if not spectacular gains in other subjects. These will be covered in 
more detail in the report of the Superintendent of Schools. 



THE COST OF PUBLIC EDUCATION 

The cost of supporting public school education in Wilmington has increased steadily during 
the past five years. From 1959 through 1963 the school budget, exclusive of maintenance 
costs, increased annually by approximately 1$% on the average. During the same period, the 
average annual increase in enrollment was Just a little over 6%, What impact is causing 
such an alarming difference between what could be expected as nominal budget increases and 
what is actually needed to operate the schools? Three factors are causing this bulge - 
(1) a greater urgency and need for better educational opportunities for our children, (2) a 
demand for more and better services, and (3) the necessity of recognizing and meeting the 



39 



salary needs of teachers, particularly if the school system is to maintain a position of 
reasonable strength in the recruitment market. 

For example, the difference between the 1963 and 1962 budgets was $152,623.53* an increase 
of ll\.fo. The larger budget was due mainly to these reasons: 

1. The decision of the School Committee to move the minimum salary for begin- 
ning teachers from $i|.200 to $1;700 

2. The necessity of budgeting for a full year in 1963 for the additional 
teachers hired for September, 1962 

3. Increments and adjustments in salaries 

I4.. The need to improve and modernize the curriculum 

This picture is not as dark as it may seem, since the average per pupil cost for the school 
year ending June 30, 1963 was $352.00 compared with a state average of approximately $391.0 
per pupil. 

State reimbursements in this five year period went from $176,920 to $219,068 for an average 
gain of close to 5%, This coupled with federal monies turned back to the town by the 
Committee has resulted in a net average cost to the town for public education of about 
of the total cost. 

To operate our schools at reasonable standards is either going to call for a more generous 
state aid program or a stepped-up federal aid program. It is doubtful whether local re- 
sources can carry this burden much longer. 

To conclude: Schools were in session 180 days, beginning September 5, 1962, and ending 
June 19, 1963. The Committee held 18 regular meetings and one special meeting during the 
year. 

The School Committee thanks the various civic committees, town departments, and the many 
individuals who have been so cooperative and helpful to the school department during the 
past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Wilmington School Committee 

Arthur V. Lynch, Chairman 

Glen E. Connolly, Vice Chairman 

Richard E. Keane, Secretary 

John P. Hartnett 

Edward F. Page 

George G. Robertie 



Superintendent of Schools 



To the School Committee and Citizens of Wilmington: 

I herewith submit my fourth Annual Report as Superintendent of the Wilmington Public Schools 
for the year ending December 31» 1963. 

Education in a free society must adapt as times, conditions, and needs of society change. 
In our public schools this adaptation is brought about by continual evaluation of the cur- 
riculum by the professional staff, lay groups, and members of the School Committee. During 
the past year, major emphasis was placed on improving the curriculum in reading, mathematics, 
English, and science. Status reports on these subjects, progress notes in other areas, and 
recommendations for improving the total school operation follow: 



STATUS REPORTS 

In 1961, the reading program was reorganized and expanded to meet more exacting demands in 
the fields of comprehension, vocabulary use, and individual study skills at both the 
elementary and secondary school levels. Some results of this reorganization are: 

1. In grades two through six in the basic reading skills in 1961, $0% of 
the pupils were reading at grade level; in September 1962, the figure 
rose to 79%; and in September 1963, it reached 90$. 

2. A developmental reading program is in progress for all seventh, eighth, 
and ninth grade students. The program is based on the use of Science 
Research Associate Laboratories, and material is geared to meet the 
needs of the slow, the average, and the gifted learner. Concurrent 
with this are briefing sessions for all English teachers in the teach- 
ing of reading, including demonstration lessons in phonics and other 
reading skills. 

3. To round out the program, the members of the Reading Department conduct 
remedial classes, tutor individual students who have severe reading 
difficulties, confer with teachers on pilot programs, and compile lists 
for supplementary and library reading in the various schools. 

Paralleling the strengthening of the reading program was the start of a massive overhauling 
of the English textbook inventory in grades seven through twelve to broaden and deepen the 
base of all phases of the language. It resulted in the purchase of several thousands of 
dollars worth of new books in the various types of literature - essay, fiction, biography, 
narrative poetry, and drama. Excellent dollar return on the monies allocated for this pro- 
ject was realized through the extensive purchase of paperback books. Phases two and three 
of the program call for (1) the development of a system of standards within the department, 
(2) an expanded vocabulary program, and (3) further utilization of reading skills materials 
with groups at all levels of competency. 

In mathematics, a complete change-over to "modern" mathematics is underway. This is neces- 
sary if Wilmington High School is to maintain its position of preparing its graduates both 
for future careers in which mathematics is required and for mathematics requirements in 
college. 



The program has the endorsement of the country's top flight ma thematic iens and is an inte- 
gral part of the mathematics curriculum in many of the leading school systems in the Unitec 
States . 

At the elementary level, the "modern" mathematics program will be introduced in grades one 
and two in the early spring of 1961;, end for grades three, four, five, and six in Septembei 
of 1961).. Meantime, a course in "modern" mathematics for ell elementary teachers, and work- 
shops and orientation programs for parents will be conducted by members of the school 
department, 

Tt is well to note that this change-over is more in approach than in content. Its aim is 1 
provide children with a greater understanding of the structure of mathematics and to de- 
velop skill in thinking mathematically. 

In science, the need for a curriculum guide in elementary science has been acute. To meet 
this need, a committee of elementary teachers, under the direction of the supervising 
principals, and with consultants from nearby universities and publishers, have been working 
for the past year and a half compiling a guide for use in grades one through six. Editing 
and collating were accomplished in the summer of 1963» and the curriculum guide became pari 
of the elementary school program in September of the same year. It is too soon to evaluate 
the final worth of the guide, but early reports do indicate that the teachers are pleased 
with it, and that the children are receiving a more thorough grounding in all phases of 
elementary science. 

At the secondary level, the teachers are in the process of putting together curriculum pro- 
posals that will result in (1) the introduction of a modern chemistry course called "CHEM" 
in addition to traditional chemistry, (2) the return of a P.S.S.C. (Physical Science Study 
Committee) physics course which the students are now ready for because of the advanced 
mathematics program, and (3) the replacement of general science in grade nine with an eartl 
physical science course. 

PROGRESS NOTES 

Summarized below are the accomplishments, the highlights, and the special activities of th< 
1963 school year. They are worthy of more than passing attention, for they are a credit t( 
the teachers, the principals, the supervisors, and the students. 

French is now on a solid basis in grade eight, thus making for a five year secondary se- 
quence in this subject. Grade seven will be phased in as soon as funds permit. French is 
no longer a part of the elementary program. The latter action was taken because of (1) the 
lack of a solid program in grades seven through twelve which removed the value of elementa: 
learnings in French, and (2) the unavailability of teachers who have the necessary language 
qualifications to carry existing TV programs beyond two periods per week, thus causing a 
breakdown in articulation and student interest. 

Steady advances were made in the Fine and Practical Arts Programs. 

In Industrial Arts, new course sequences were being streamlined to enable the student to 
specialize intensively in his junior and senior years after taking introductory and ex- 
ploratory courses in woodworking, metal working, electricity, and graphic arts in his 
freshman and sophomore years. 

In Home Economics, a complete four year program, covering foods, clothing, nutrition, chil' 
care and family living, is fully operative for the first time c 

The Art and Music Festivals are reaching quality stature with each succeeding year. The 
band is ready for concert work; the repertoire of the choral groups is expanding; more stu 
dents are majoring in Art at the post high school level. 

The School Health Department administered Sabin Oral Polio Vaccine, Type II, to 33^ pupil, 
gave 3iiV7 vision tests, conducted 3619 hearing tests, and assisted in 12Bk physical 



U2 



sxaminations , in addition to the handling of routine office visits of pupils, home visits, 
3chool visits, parent conferences, attendance at professional meetings, record keeping, and 
the registration of new pupils in the school system. This Department is a tremendously 
Important and valuable adjunct of the regular school program, and the nurses know and do 
bheir work well under the supervision of Doctors Gerald Fagan and Ernest MacDougall. 

The Physical Education program, while maybe not ideal, is educationally sound, has no frills, 
and can hold its own with many school systems spending far more money on this program than 
Wilmington. Emphasis this past year was placed on correcting muscle weaknesses in the 
shoulders and girdle area of students, and increasing the time spent on calisthenics, 
rythmic exercises, tumbling, and gymnastics. 

The Special Education Department, responsible for educational programs of our mentally re- 
tarded children, is making great strides to better meet the needs of this type of child. 
The curriculum is becoming more varied, more individualized, and more meaningful. Parents 
and friends in increasingly large numbers are providing invaluable aid to the staff. High- 
Light of last year's activities in this department was the first graduation for students of 
the senior division. It was exceptionally well received by the parents and public, and the 
jeremony was a source of great pride and inward satisfaction to the students. This recog- 
lition was long overdue. 

The latest survey of the Class of 1963* Wilmington High School, reveals the following 
statistics : 

Four Year Colleges 39$ 
Technical Schools 8$ 
Junior Colleges 3$ 
Business Schools \$> 
Preparatory Schools 2$ 
Nursing Schools 

Armed Forces 7$ 
Working Force 33$ 

Total 100$ 

Total to further education 
and Armed forces 67$ 

besides the large increase in the number of youngsters attending college, the trend that 
seems to be prevalent in the last few graduating classes has been an increase in the 
lumber of youngsters attending technical schools instead of immediately entering the work- 
ing force or the Armed services. 

In social studies at the high school level, the latest trend is to place emphasis on the 
Philosophies of the various periods rather than on the memorization of multitudinous facts, 
lembers of the department are currently working on curriculum revision and sequence and 
jhould be ready for major recommendations in these areas in another year. 

jibrary services were intensified in all subject fields at the secondary level, in order to 
lelp our young people become more skillful and more discriminating in their use of libraries 
md printed materials, and to provide them with materials and services appropriate to their 
Individual investigations. Total circulation for the past year was lj.2,307 from an inventory 
)f 6,873 volumes, or about I4..5 per pupil. This compares favorably with the state picture. 



RECOMMENDATIONS 

?o meet the many problems that face our schools and our community in the years ahead, some 
.ong range plans and recommendations are in order. These problems range in scope from how 
;o meet the impact of automation on the productive capacity of the future graduates of the 
ligh school to how to adequately finance the construction of new schools. Some of the ways 
light be as follows: 



1. 



2. 



5. 



.0 



6. 



7. 



Continue to emphasize and upgrade reading programs, grades one through 
twelve. For a person who must be retrained because of loss of job 
caused by automated machinery, and this is likely to happen at least 
three times in his productive life, the stronger his mastery of read- 
ing skills, the stronger his chances of successful reassignment. 

Continue to provide the Business Department with modern equipment and 
material particularly in the fields of key punch and data processing. 
Over the years, this has been one of the strongest departments in the 
high school, and its graduates are much sought after by the business 
community. 

Establish a Work-Study-Program in the high school for the "marginal" 
student. This program wherein a student spends only part of a day in 
school and the remainder in some type of work experience in the com- 
munity, would be a boon for students who might otherwise quit school, 
and who have lost confidence in themselves. 



Provide special psychological services 
are neglected, maladjusted, emotionally 
linquent. It has been amply demonstrat 
and the courts that if a child receives 
justment is first observed, he may be s 
which lead to poor scholastic achieveme 
home, school, and society, and eventual 
ship in the Lowell Mental Health Clinic 
of these problems, it is probably not e 



to counsel and 
disturbed, or 
ed by the soci 
the essential 
aved from its 
nt, poor relat 
delinquency, 
is helping to 
nough. 



help children who 
potentially de- 
al researchers 

help when malad- 
developing effects, 
ionships with 
Although member- 
alleviate some 



Push vigorously and enlist the support of all lay groups for a more 
generous and equalized state aid allotment to local education. The 
time has long since passed when the property tax alone can be expected 
to carry the burden for the support of public education in many com- 
munities. This is unrealistic, if not discriminatory. Wilmington is 
one of these communities. 

Initiate as soon as conditions permit a replacement program for the 
Whitefield, Center, Rogers, and Walker Schools. These schools have 
more than served their original purpose, and only the valiant efforts 
of the Maintenance Department prevent them from becoming dilapidated 
and more obsolete, not to mention hazardous because of fire danger. 
They cannot serve us much longer. 

Consider the possibility of a pilot program which would permit quali- 
fied seniors in our high school to do independent study in the many 
fine museums, libraries, cultural centers, laboratories, and other 
resources in the Boston Metropolitan area. We now have a few seniors, 
and will have more, who are capable of doing the traditional five days 
of schooling in four. To permit these students to broaden their whole 
range of scholarship, for example, one day a week under skilled super- 
vision, in an appropriate location, could be an exhilarating learning 
experience • 

These are but a few of the many challenges. Always with us are the problems of adequate 
salaries for teachers, more health services, additional special programs for the physically 
and mentally handicapped, and more and better instructional aids. However, the spirit and 
willingness with which you have met these problems in the past augurs well for the future 
of Wilmington. The teachers and the administrative staff stand ready to serve you. 

In closing, I would like to express my sincere appreciation to all who helped in the succes: 
of the school program during the past year. Much would go undone without their cooperation 

Respectfully submitted, 

Harold S. Shea 
Superintendent of Schools 



kk 



WILMINGTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 
WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 









MEMBERSHIP 


BY AGE 


AND 


GRADE 


- OCTOBER 


If 


1963 
















AGE - GRADE 


DISTRIBUTION 










19 


Ages : 


5 


6 


7 8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14- 


15 


16 


17 


18 


and 
over 


Grades 




























Total 


1 


98 


36J+ 


4-8 






















510 


2 




78 


287 63 


7 




















4-35 


3 




2 


57 258 


59 


10 


2 
















388 


k 






4-9 


252 


62 


14- 
















377 


5 








1 l 

44- 


loci 


4-9 


16 














297 


6 










4-5 


216 


50 


13 


1 










325 


7 












36 


195 


4-7 


13 


1 








292 


8 












1 


57 


163 


52 


12 


2 






287 


9 
















39 


186 


61 


18 


1 


1 


306 


10 


















1+7 


137 


36 


12 




232 


11 




















50 




39 


k 


2 2i|9 


12 




















1 


57 


110 


22 


k 19k 


Ungraded 




1 


4- 3 


7 


11 


6 


7 


10 


13 


5 


5 


1 




73 




98 


4-4-5 


396 373 


369 


316 


324. 


325 


272 


312 


267 


272 


163 


27 


6 3965 



kS 



Maintenance Department 



Boutwell School ; 

Ventilation improved in kitchen 
T.V. antenna replaced 

Oil burner overhauled and check valve in- 
stalled on pipe from oil tank 
Edging installed on five sink counter tops 
All inside doors and window sills sealed 



Buzzell School : 

Installed a hot top sidewalk from front 
door to Swain School parking lot 
(Highway Dept. ) 



High School (continued) : 

All boiler filters serviced, firewalls 
checked 

Filled in all cracks in walls and painted 
All stairway railings painted 
Replaced broken tile 

Sanded and resealed bleachers in gym 

Repaired leak in kitchen roof and girls 1 
locker room 

Sanded and sealed all work tables in art 
and home economics rooms (50 student 
tables, 50 studentdesks ) 

Caulked all windows and doors where neces- 
sary 



Center School: 



Mildred Rogers School : 



v 

L 

10 

L 

.0 

'.J 

JS 

|L 





Patched floors, refitted doors, also minor 
repairs 

Sanded and sealed floors in two rooms 



Glen Road School : 

Sealed all interior doors and window sills 

Repaired laminated beam - room #9. Re- 
moved dead logs and debris from 
play yard 

Ventilation in kitchen improved 

Heating vent system overhauled 

Stage repaired 



High School : 

Installed heating unit in metal shop 
Painted gymnasium, auditorium, foyer and 

all outside doors, upper structure and 
heating ducts, bulletin boards, boys' 
locker room, carpenter shop, metal 
shop and main office 
Greenhouse dismantled 

Roof patched on #1 wing, skylights over 
library covered with plastic 

Ventilation in boys 1 locker room improved 

Installed roof drain 

Yard around boiler room hard topped 

Replaced drain cover and rebuilt top of 
drain in teachers' parking lot 



Outside of building painted completely 
Two new sinks installed 
Rebuilt cupulo, replaced wood shingles 
Installed new conductor drain-pipes 
Made and installed new identification 
name sign 



North Intermediate School : 

Made and installed four V x 8' bulletin 
boards 

Made and installed three book cases in 

guidance room 
Made and installed book shelves on three 

walls 5' high 
Made and installed receiving and checkout 

desk for books 
Installed iron grating outside gym doors 
Made and installed teachers' mail cabinet 
Made and installed sewing cabinet and 86 

sewing boxes 



Swain School : 

Basement floor repaired and covered with 
waterproof paint 



k6 



Wildwood School: 



Basement : 



Link fence installed outside picture win- 
dow south wing 

Blackout curtains installed in all purpose 
room 

Putty replaced and glass where necessary 
Outside awning repaired 

Library table and all wooden chairs stripped 

and refinished 
Boiler room door repaired 
Sealed and hung five new inside doors 
Tar patched roof 

Made and installed strips on outside vents 



Whitefield School : 

Outside of building painted completely 
Replaced all broken shingles 
Painted Room #2 completely 

Floors sanded and sealed in rooms #2 and $± 
Blackboards treated 

Installed black base on all halls and 
stairways 

West School: 



New chain link fence installed 

New oil burner installed 

Cement steps and rails installed 

Made and installed identification name sign 



Walker School : 

Landscaped school grounds (Park Dept.) 



Town Hall : 

Renovated Town Manager's office 
Removed partition and chimney 
Installed two new windows 
Lowered ceiling 18" 
Walls panelled 
Hung two new doors 

Made and installed two wall-to-wall book 
cases 

Patched and laid 5/8 plyscore and rubber 
tile 

Installed baseboard heat 
Sealed, painted and papered 

Welfare Office : 

Sanded two floors - sealed and waxed 
Painted completely 



Boxed in timber wires 

Put two coats of paint on three rooms and 

hallway 
Stained and sealed all doors 



Vault Room : 
Installed shelves 

Filled all cracks and waterproofed walls 
Overhauled boiler 



Roman House : 
Patched roof 

Overhauled heating system 



Library : 

Made and installed I4. 1 x V bookcase 
Repaired boiler room door 

Repaired front door; redoweled and reglued 

and repaired lock 
Painted and installed storm window 



Voting Equipment : 

Made eight new voting booths 
Repaired railings 

Assembled and disassembled as required on 
voting days 



Miscellaneous : 

All pin-up boards in all classrooms re- 
painted 

All school warning signs repainted 
All chalk boards cleaned and treated 
All wooden platforms and steps treated 
All fire extinguishers checked and re- 
charged 
All windows washed 
All boilers and flues cleaned 
All septic tanks cleaned as necessary 
All storage rooms and cellars inspected 

and cleaned 
All schools inspected for sand and rock 
salt 

Fire prevention in regard to all doors, 
exits, etc. strictly observed 

Co-operation of all personnel in reporting 
the need for minor repairs before they de- 
velop into major repairs eliminates costly 
repair bills. 



H7 



Accepted Streets 





Street 


From 


To 


Mil 


es 


Feet 


Date(sJ Accepted 


Adams Street 


Middlesex Avenue 


Parker Street 






1+600 


3-02-08 






Ainsworth Road 


Woburn Street 


Town land 






2600 


6-05-61 






Aldrich Road 


Shews he en Avenue 


Billerica Line 


1. 


2 




11-06-91+ 






Andover Street 


Salem Street 


Andover Line 


2. 


3 




11-06-91]. 






Auburn Avenue 


Shawsheen Avenue 








800 


3-12-1+5 






Ayotte Street 


Westdale Avenue 


Crest Avenue 






21+0 


3-10-1+7 






Baker Street 


Brand Avenue 








700 


3-12-1+5 






Ballardvale St. 


Salem Street 


Andover Line 


2. 


7 




11-06-91+ 






Bancroft Street 


Liberty Street 


B & M R. R. 






14.00 


3-17-52 






Beacon Street 


Church Street 


Belmont Avenue 






1000 


3-01-15 






Beech Street 


Burlington Ave. 


Byron Street 






1000 


3-10-1+7 






Beeching Avenue 


Cunningham Street 


Faulkner Avenue 






kSo 


3-11+-59 






Belmont Avenue 


Columbia Street 


State Street 






1000 


3-03-33 








Judith Road 


Shcpt Street 






1550 


3-17-52 


3 


-10-53 


Boutwell Street 


Aldrich Road 


Burlington Ave. 


0. 


8 




11-06-91+ 


3 


-12-60 


Brand Avenue 


Bridge Lane 


Baker Street 






2370 


3-13-33 


3 


-08-1+3 


Brattle Street 


Massachusetts Ave 


Garden Avenue 






1100 


3-12-1+5 






Brentwood Avenue 


Woodside Avenue 


Woburn Street 






907 


6-21-38 






Bridge Lane 


Main Street 


Shawsheen Ave. 


0. 


3 




11-06-91+ 






Broad Street 


Carmel Street 


Both Ways 






1377 


3-13-51+ 






Burlington Ave. 


Main Street 


Burlington Line 


1.6 




11-06-91+ 






Burnap Street 


Grove Avenue 


Winchell Road 






1378 


3-12-1+5 


3 


-10-53 


Burt Road 


Cedar Street 


Fall Street 






2500 


3-12-1+5 


3 


-11-I+6 


Butters Row 


Main Street 


Chestnut St. 


0.6 




11-06.91+ 







ACCEPTED STREETS: 



Street 


From 


To 


Canal Street 


Shawsheen Avenue 


Burt Road 


Carolyn Road 


North Street 


Linda Road 


Carson Avenue 


Hathaway Road 


Both Ways 


Carson Ave. Ext. 


Marie Drive 




Carter Lane 


Shawsheen Avenue 




Cedar Street 


Harris Street 


Burt Road 


Central Street 


Middlesex Avenue 


Church Street 


Chandler Road 


Kelly Road 


Adams Street 


Chapman Avenue 


Hathaway Road 




Chase Road 


Hathaway Road 




Chestnut Street 


Burlington Avenue 


Woburn Line 


Church Street 


Main Street 


Middlesex Ave. 


Clark Street 


Main Street 


Church Street 


Cochrane Road 


Forest Street 


Warren Road 


Columbia Street 


Church Street 


Talbot Avenue 


Concord Street 


Federal Street 


N. Reading Line 


Congress Street 


Forest Street 


Burlington Line 


Cook Avenue 


Main Street 


Kensington Ave. 


Coolidge Road 


Hathaway Road 




Corey Avenue 


Grand Street 


Canal Street 


Cottage Street 


Main Street 




Crest Avenue 


Ayotte Street 




Cross Street 


Main Street 


Lowell Street 


Cunningham St. 


Salem Street 


Beeching Ave. 


Cypress Street 


Glen Road 




Davis Street 


Main street 




Dayton Road 


Hathaway Road 




Dell Drive 


Burlington Ave. 





Miles Feet I Dete(s) Accepted 





1511 


t a t A to 
XU-Xo -3 V 




V5U 


7 TO A a 




Off 


3-J-U-53 




t aa 

_jUU 


0. 1 1 At 




J14.UU 


3-09-57 




A C\C\ 


O TO 1. 




5 IK 


1 n t A £a 

xu— 10 — p u 




l\X)\) 


3-U7-5 f 




100 


3-05-5-I. 




01 


3-IU-53 


<- ♦ J 




11 - UO — 7iJ- 


n ft 
U . o 




1 1 —OA— Qli 
XX — UO — 714. 


n ft 
u . o 




X -L — UD ~ 714. 




Ann 


■J —1 n_ li 7 
3--Lu-ilf 


a t 
U.X 




■3 AO AA 

3— U^-UO 


1.1 




1 1 aA Qli 

ix— uo— 74. 




965 


1 A T A OA 
IO-XO-39 




xuuu 


11 I.A 

3-11-iib 




270 


3-05-51 




370 


3-05-51 




920 


3-13-5U 




560 


3-10-li7 




900 


ll-Ob-9/4. 




2320 


3M 3/! 




260 


3-05-51 




500 


3-17-52 




170 


3-05-51 




U50 


3-08-58 



3-12-55 
3-12-55 



3-13-33 



k9 



ACCEPTED STREETS: 



L 

(0 

.0 

J 
I 





Street 
, 


From 


To 


Miles 


Feet 


Date(s) Accepted 


Dobson Street 


Glen Road 


Cary Street 




II4.O2 


3-13-54 






Dorchester St. 


Billerica Line 






11+00 

1 


3-05-51 






Dorothy Avenue 


Barbara Avenue 


Arlene Avenue 




1556 


3-12-60 






Draper Drive 


Gunderson Road 






100 I 


3-11+-59 






Drury Lane 


School Street 


Glen Road 




1 


3-9-63 






Dublin Avenue 


Main Street 






500 


3-05-51 






Dunton Road 


Nassau Avenue 


Both Ways 




638 


3-10-56 






Eames Street 


Main Street 


Woburn Street 


0.7 




II-O6-9I4. 






Edwards Road 


Forest Street 


Baldwin Road 




ij.50 


3-IO-I4.7 






Emerson Street 


Oakwood Road 


Faulkner Avenue 




600 


3-05-51 






Fairfield Avenue 


Main Street 






1300 


3-11-U6 






Fairmeadow Road 


Nichols Street 


Nichols Street 




2328 


3-08-58 






Pairview Avenue 


State Street 






650 


3-13-33 






Faneuil Drive 


Massachusetts Ave. 






1000 


10-16-50 






Faulkner Avenue 


Glen Road 


W, Jamaica Ave. 




2671 


3-13-U4- 


3 


-10-53 


Fay Street 


Glen Road 


Cary Street 




700 


6-21-38 


3 


-12-I4.5 


Federal Street 


Middlesex Ave. 


Woburn Street 


1.1 




11-06-91J. 






Forest Street 


Aldrich Road 


Burlington Ave. 


0.8 




11-06-914. 






Glen Road 


Main Street 


Middlesex Ave. 


1.3 




II-O6-9I4. 






Glendale Circle 


Glen Road 


Glen Road 




1300 


3-17-52 






Glenview Road 


Suncrest Ave. 






36 


3-1*4.-59 






Gowing Road 


Park Street 


Marcus Road 




900 


3-10-56 






Grand Street 


Shawsheen Ave. 


Dunmore Road 




850 


3-17-52 






Grant Street 


Federal Street 


B & M R. R. 




780 


3-08-14.3 






Grove Avenue 


Main Street 


Lake Street 


o.u 




9-29-10 






Gunderson Road 


Hathaway Road 


Both Ways 




1081 


3-14-59 







50 



ACCEPTED STREETS 



Miles Feet . Date(a) Accepted" 



Street 



From 



To 



Ham] in Lane 
Hardin Street 
H8rnden Street 
Harris Street 
Harvard Avenue 
Hathaway Road 
Hawthorne Road 
High Street 
Hillside Way 
Hilltop Road 
Hobson Avenue 
Hopkins Street 

Jacuith Road 
Jones Avenue 
Judith Road 

Kelly Road 
Kendall Street 
Kiernan Avenue 
Kilmarnock St. 
King Street 
Kirk Street 

Lake Street 
Lang Street 
Laurel Avenue 
Lawrence Court 
Lawrence Street 
Ledgewood Road 



Lawrence Street 
Aldrich Road 
Main Street 
Burlington Ave. 
Main Street 
Woburn Street 
Voburn Street 
Middlesex Ave. 
Chestnut Street 
Suncrest Avenue 
Pine Avenue 
Shawsheen Ave . 

Shewsheen Ave. 
Glen Road 
Birchwood Roed 

Adams Street 
Aldrich Road 
Main Street 
West St. 
Glen Road 
Main Street 

Main Street 
Bancroft Street 
Malloy Road 
Lawrence Street 
Glendale Circle 
Suncrest Ave. 



Lubbers Brook 
Glen Road 
Cedar Street 
River Street 
Gunderson Road 

Woburn Street 
Burl ington Line 



150 feet beyond 
Wiser Street 

Billerica Line 



Cedar Crest Rd. 

Blanchard Rd. 

Reading Line 
Broad Street 

Shawsheen Ave. 
B & M R. R. 
Parker Street 

Shady Lane Dr. 



0.1 



0.5 
0.5 



0.5 



0.5 



1.0 



558 
250 

700 
i+30 
1S58 
230 



361+ 
1520 

1250 
719 

520 

923 
1300 
693 

21+00 
572 



1+00 
657 
683 
3773 
383 



3-10-62 
3-05-51 
3-01+-95 
3-12-1+5 

3-05-51 

3/51 3/53 3/59 

3-10-56 
11-06-91+ 

3-02-11+ 

3-11+-59 
3A5 3/51 3/52 
11-06-91+ 

3-08-1+8 3A9 3/51 
6-10-1+0 
3-10-53 

3-09-57 
3-12-1+5 
3-08-58 
11-06-91+ 
6-10-1+0 3-12-1+5 
3-05-51 

11-06-91+ 

3-17-52 
10-16-50 

3-10-56 

3-10-56 

3-14-59 



51 



ACCEPTED STREETS i 



Date(s) Accepted 



Street 



1 Tom 



To 



Miles Feet 



Liberty Street 
Lincoln Street 
Linda Road 
Lloyd Road 
Lockwood Roed 
Longview Road 
Loumac Road 
Lowell Street 
Lowell St. Park 

Mackey Road 
Main Street 
Marcus Road 
Marcia Road 
Marie Drive 
Marion Street 

Marjorie Road 
Massachusetts Ave. 
McDonald Road 
Meadow Lane 
Middlesex Avenue 
Miles Street 
Miller Road 
Morse Avenue 
Mystic Avenue 

Nassau Avenue 
Nichols Street 
Nickerson Ave. 



Federal Street 
Federal Street 
High Street 
Main Street 
Ballardvale St, 
Middlesex Ave. 
Drury Lane 
Main Street 
Station 7+50 

Federal Street 
Tewksbury Line 
Gowing Road 
North Street 
Woburn Street 
Burlington Ave, 

Main Street 
Main Street 
Salem Street 
Suncrest Ave. 
Main Street 
Main Street 
Glen Road 
Woburn Street 
Middlesex Ave. 

Shawsheen Ave. 
Shawsheen Ave. 
West Street 



B & M R. R, 
B & M R. R, 



To end 

Reading Line 
Station 11+ + 50 



1.9 



Woburn Line j 1+. 

Gowing Road 



Thrush Road 



St. Paul St. 



Salem Street 
Hobson Avenue 
Emerson Street 



2.3 



Decatur Street 
Shawsheen River 



0.7 



714-0 
720 
1780 
1050 
990 
650 



250 

2315 

1130 

1285 

(1739) 
( 900) 

1550 
800 

H+21+ 
363 

1+00 
61+0 
1361 
598 

2000 
900 



3 -08 -1+3 
3-08-I+3 

10- 16-50 
3-05-51 
3-09-57 
3-1U-59 
3-09-63 

11- 06-91+ 
1908 & 1957 

3-08-1+3 
11-06-91+ 
3-08-58 
3-10-62 
3-11-61 

9-01-06 County 
3-12-1+5 

3-05-51 

3-12-1+5 

3-13-I+I+ 

3-09-57 

11-06-91+ 

3-12-1+5 

3-12-1+5 

10- 16-39 
3-02-08 

3-11-1+6 

11- 06-91+ 
3-10-1+7 



52 



ACCEPTED STREETS: 



Street 


From 


To 


Miles 


Feet 


Date(s) t 


Norfolk Street 


Carter Lane 


Nassau Ave. 




538 


3-13-54 


North Street 


Middlesex Ave. 


Dadant Drive 




3533 


3-12-1+5 


Oak Street 


Salem Street 






350 


3-19-51 


Oakdale Road 


Judith Road 


Short Street 




2280 


10-16-50 


Oakridge Circle 


Gowing Road 


Gowing Road 




1730 


3-08-58 


Oakwood Road 


Main Street 


Fairfield Ave. 




850 


3-11-46 


Olson Street 


Church Street 






132 


3-09-57 


Park Street 


Woburn Street 


N. Reading Line 


0.9 




11-06-91). 


Parker Street 


Lowell Street 


Blackstone St. 


O.36 




^-0k-07 


Patricia Circle 


Dell Drive 


Dell Drive 




595 


3-08-58 


Pershing Street 


Federal Street 


B & M R. R. 




720 


3-08-k3 


Phlll Id 5 ! Avenue 


W1qoT> St'peet 

" X O KJ X. -J U J. \s <-J 


Wild Avenue 




1800 


^-ll-k6 


Pilling Road 


Hathaway Road 


Both ways 




9^0 


"^-lk-59 


PItia Avpnn a 


Md t n St" r*A A 1" 
"a ill u bl CO v 


Hoh^on Avayiha 




kOO 




Pineridge Road 


North Street 


Linda Road 




900 


3-12-60 


Pineview Road 


Lipp Street 


Adelman Road 






3-10-53 


Pinewood Road 


Birchwood Road 


Shady Lane Dr. 




1332 


3-13-5U 


Pleasant Road 


Middlesex Ave. 


Linda Road 




750 


3-10-62 


Powder House Cir. 


Middlesex Ave. 






730 


3-13-54 




\j x a i rv ouicou 




n ? 




**-m -oq 

J wl ^ 7 


Ridge Road 


Suncrest Avenue 






365 


3-10-56 


River Street 


Massachusetts Ave. 


Harvard Avenue 




kko 


3-10-62 


Rollins Road 


Fenway Street 


Marion Street 




200 


3-13-54 


Roosevelt Road 


Boutwell Street 


Burlington Ave. 




2000 


3-11-46 


Royal Street 


Salem Street 






101+0 


3-05-51 


Salem Street 


Tewksbury Line 


N. Reading Line 


2.7 




11-06-94 


School Street 


Middlesex Ave. 


High School Lot 




616 


3-01-15 



53 



ACCEPTED STREKT3: 



Street 


From 


To 


Miles 


Feet 


Date ( s ) Accepted 


School Street 


Buzzell School 


Dead end 






3-09-63 


Sewell rtoad 


Hathaway Road 






380 


3-12-55 


Sliedy Lane Dr. 


Middlesex Avenue 


Lawrence Street 




2676 


3-08-59 


Shawsheen Avenue 


Main Street 


Billerica Line 


2.2 




11-06-91; 


Sheridan Road 


Hathaway Hood 








3-05-51 


Silver Lake Ave. 


Lake Street 


Dexter Street 




i|^5 


3-13-54 


Sprucewood Hoad 


Shady Lane Dr. 


Short Street 




600 


3-17-52 


State Street 


Belmont Avenue 


Fairview Ave. 




275 


3-03-33 


Strout Avenue 


Lowell Street 






6% 


3-17-55 


Suncrest Avenue 


Vest Street 






121J.6 


3-13-514- 


Swain Road 


Forest Street 


Burlington Ave. 


o.k 




3-20-22 10-16-29 


Taft Road 


Burlington Ave. 


Boutwell Street 




3237 


6-21-38 


Taplin Avenue 


Hob son Avenue 


Lubbers Brook 




900 


3-11-14-6 


Temple Street 


Church Street 








6-06-11 


Thrush Road 


Salem Street 


Marie Drive 




400 


3-11-61 


Thurston Ave. 


Church Street 




0.2 




3-04-07 


Truman Road 


Hathaway Road 






300 


3-10-53 


upton i/ouri; 


Andover Street 




0.1 




11-06-94 


Veranda Avenue 


Main Street 


Lubbers Brook 




1076 


3-06-16 


Virginia Road 


N. Reading Line 






1200 


3-13-54 


lifn 1 C +■ -wo a 4- 
WtlXn.t3l OUItScl/ 












Warren Road 


Lake Street, 
Tewksbury 






100 


3-13-54 


Washington Ave. 


Clark Street 


Chase Street 


0.3 




3-01-20 


West Street 


Woburn Street 


Reading Line 


1.7 




11-06-94 


Westdale Avenue 


West Street 


B & M R. R. 




1211 


6-22-42 


Wightman Road 


Warren Road 


Albert Street 




230 


3-13-54 



ACCEPTED STREETS: 



Street 


From 


To 


Miles 


Feet 


Dste(s) Accepted 


Wild Avenue 


Grove Avenue 


B & M R. R. 


0.? 




12-29-10 


Wildwood Street 


Middlesex Ave. 


Woburn Street 


1.1 




11-06-91+ 


Williams Avenue 


Main Street 






693 


6-10-1+0 


Wilson Street 


Federal Street 


B & M R. R. 




760 


3-08-1+3 


Winchell Road 


Grove Avenue 


Burnap Street 




200 


J> 4-5 


Wing Road 


Woburn Street 






71+6 


3-08-58 


Wiser Street 


Main Street 


Taplin Avenue 




900 


10-16-50 


Woburn Street 


Andover Street 


Woburn Line 






11-06-91+ 


Woodlawn Avenue 


Border Avenue 


Kensington Ave. 




250 


3-17-52 



Veterans' Agent 



During 1963 this Department processed Three Hundred and Sixty-six (366) applications for 
monetary aid as follows: 

Chapter 115 as amended : 

87 applications were referred to other cities and towns 
29 applications were rejected 
250 applications were approved for aid totaling over $1+9,1+10.25 

This represents an increase in the number of cases handled. Of this total, about $20,000 
was paid to hospitals, $11,000.00 was paid for doctors, dentists and medication; $18,1+10.25 
was paid to veterans or their dependents, who were unable to work because of illness or 
age limitations. In contrast, less than $12,000.00 was spent on employable veterans who 
are temporarily out of work. This is an increase over the previous year. 

With increasing medical, surgical, and hospital costs, together with an increase in case 
load, it is not anticipated that future expenditures will lessen. 



55 



Housing Authority 



Organization ; 

The Wilmington Housing Authority is authorized by the General Laws, Chapter 121, Section 26} 
as amended. 



Members : 



Edwin F. Forrest, Chairman Walter J. Gustus, Asst. Treasurer 

James P. Donahue, Vice Chairman Ernest M. Crispo, Secretary and Representa- 

Ralph D. Peterson, Treasurer tive of State Housing Bd. 



Statutory Reference : 

1. Housing Authority Law: Section 261 to 26CCC inclusive, of Chapter 121 of the 
General Laws, as amended, 

2. Act to Provide Housing for Veterans: Chapter 200 of the Acta of 19/4-8, as amended, 

3. Act to Provide Housing for Elderly Persons of Low Income: Chapter 667 of the Acts of 
195ij-» as amended, 

L 

10 

L 

Veteran's Housing: 
.J ° 

Location - Wildwood Street Number of Units - 13 Average Rent - $70,00 

Rentals are based on the income of the veteran. This Project was originally planned for 
veterans of the low-income group of great need who were living under poor housing condi- 
tions. During this past year, the local Housing Authority, in conjunction with the State 
Housing Board, surveyed the town and determined that no further need existed for these 
apartments, and steps were taken to initiate the sale of these houses. 

The property was completely liquidated by December of 1963, putting thirteen homes on a 
tax-paying basis in the town. In addition to the revenue which has been added to the town, 
the profit realized by the State from this transaction will be shared with the Town as soon 
as auditing procedure has been completed. 



Housing for the Elderly : 

Location - Deming Way .Number of Units - [(.0 Rent - $ij.8.00 

Requirements for occupancy of these units are that a person must be sixty-five (65) years 
of age or over and must be of low income. Persons must be in need of good housing. It 
must be noted that proper management has kept the rental at $i(.8,00 regardless of general 
increasing costs. 



56 



Balance Sheet as of December 31, 1963 

200-1 

Assets 

Administration Fund $ 3,632.12 

State Treasurer's Account 155*000.00 

Reading Coop. Bank 2,000.00 

Mechanics Savings 9,957.92 

Accounts Receivable I4.65.I4.9 

Prepaid Insurance 563*27 

Development Cost $198,000.00 

Liquidated 32,000.00 156,000.00 

Total $327.618.80 

Liabilities 

Reserve for Tenants A/R 14.27. 77 

Accrued Pilot 75.88 

Matured Interest and Principal 3,652.00 

Proceeds from Sales 155,000.00 

Bonds Authorized $198,000.00 

Less: Notes Retired 14.2,000.00 156,000.00 

Debt Service Reserve 7,128.00 

Operating Reserve 5»l4-7l4-»28 

Reduction of Annual Contribution 1,760.53 



329,510. 
1,899, 

Total $327,618.80 



Operating Deficit 2,362.22 

Prior Surplus U62.56 1,899.66 



667-1 Administration 

Assets 

Administration Fund 2,968.09 

Petty Cash 20.00 

Mechanics Savings Bank 11,3144*19 

Prepaid Insurance 2,ij.27.26 
Development Cost $575,000.00 

Liquidated 21.000.00 55U. 000.00 

Total $570,759. 5k 

Liabilities 

Matured Interest and Principal 737.50 

Debt Service Reserve 3,800.00 

Operating Reserve 12,238.77 
Bonds Authorized $575,000.00 

Less: Notes Retired 10,000.00 551i. 000.00 

570,776.27 

Operating Deficit 16.73 

Total $570,759,514. 



57 



Board of Public Welfare 



The Wilmington Board of Public Welfare respectfully submits its Annuel Report for the year 
1963. The Board consists of Mr. Maurice O'Neil, Chairman of the Board, Miss Florence galkus 
end Mrs. Arms Bow as members of the Board. 

The three employees of the Board are Welter F. Coleman, the Director of Public Assistance, 
who also serves as Secretary to the Board, Mrs. Miriam Sullivan is the Senior Clerk and 
Stenographer and Miss Josephine Kane is the Social Worker. All employees of the Welfare 
Board are hired under the Merit System and he ve Civil Service status, which is required 
under the law. 

The categories of assistance which come under the supervision of the Board of Public Welfare 
are as follows: General Belief, Aid to Families with Dependent Children, Disability Assis- 
tance, Old Age Assistance and Medical Assistance for the Aged. The last four categories 
are part of the Social Security Act and entitles each community to Federal end State reim- 
bursements for the greater pert of the aid rendered under these four programs. General 
Belief is supported jointly by the State and local rovernments, with no Federal participa- 
tion. 

Local Boards of Public ''elfare must comply with the laws, rules and policies set forth by 
the Federal and State governments which covern the disbursement of aid. Failure on the 
local level could result in the loss of reimbursement from these sources for the aid rendered 
w under these five categories. 

L 

t Personnel working on Welfare programs should keep in mind certain basic concepts. The first 

is the role of government in helping to meet the welfare needs of our citizens. The second 
concept of our time is the minimum standard of living. In a Nation as wealthy as ours, there 
should be a minimum level for health, welfare and educational services, below which no one 
should be permitted to fall. The third concept is that we no longer identify social pro- 
grams with a favored group. We believe these services should be available to everyone. 
The fourth concept is the nature and source of personal initiative. V r e have learned from 

) past experience that the unemployed and the indigent are no different from other people ex- 

cept for their desperate situations. They have the same weaknesses and strengths and in 
most cases need opportunity, not moral reform. Most people want to be useful and needed 
members of society. Economic security and hope breeds greater initiative and enterprise 
than the feelings of inadequacy, suffering and fear. A person's feeling of self-respect 
influences his ability to do and act for himself. The fifth concept is that a person will 
become a productive and useful part of society unless he is crushed by forces beyond his 

J' control. All of us are subject to such hazards, but if the risk of these hazards are shared 

by society as a whole, the effect on the individual can be lessened. The sixth and final 
concept is that society as a whole cannot be healthy if any proportion of the population is 
unhealthy. No democratic society can preserve the freedom of its people if a large propor- 
tion of the population is unhealthy socially, economically or politically. 

A Welfare Agency in a community the size of Wilmington must give services that are normally 
the role of a private agency in larger communities. These services include child counsel- 
ing, home management, personal and family problems, arranging foster home care, marriage 
counseling with stress on reconciliation of estranged parents and job finding for able— 
bodied fathers. The job finding means that this Board must have the co-operation of local 
industry, the State Employment service and the Town government. To date, this relationship 
has been excellent and reflects on our welfare rolls. At the close of the year 1963» the 
Board was not aiding any family with an able— bodied father in the home. 



58 



Members of the Welfare Board attended various conferences and workshops daring the past year 
for the purpose of improving the efficiency of the Agency rnd to better understand the new 
laws, rules and policies affecting Welfare Boards, Attendance at some of these meetings is 
mandatory by the State Department of Public Welfare and local communities are reimhursed for 
approximately 75' of the expenses incurred under administration. 

The Board of Public Welfare again lived within its appropriation and any balances in its 
Town Accounts reverted to the Town's Excess and Deficiency Account. Please r«fer to the 
Town Accountant's report for the exact amounts returned. i^ny anticipated surplus in the 
Board's Federal accounts was used in competing the budget for l%li.. Trie Board thi.3 past 
year also increased its collections from estranged fathers of children who are on our Aid 
to Families with Dependent Children program. This is the third successive year that has 
shown an increase in this phase of our work. This is due to the Agency's diligence with the 
aid of the local Police Department, the Probation Department and the District Court's aware- 
ness of these problems,, A more detailed explanation of each category under the Board's 
supervision will follow on these pages and any changes in the Welfare laws during tue past 
year will also be incorporated under the various category headings. 



OLD AGE ASSISTANCE 

This category is a Federally-sponsored, State plan administered oy law through the local 
Boards of Public 1! elfare. The law requires local Boards to aid aged persons sixty-five and 
over, who are in need, and who have resided in Massachusetts for one year prior to applica- 
tion. Need is determined by applying budgetary standards set up by the State Department of 
Pub 1 ic "elf are. Some other requirements are personal property, such as cash, savings, bonds, 
etc., not to exceed $500.00. Liens are placed on property if the applicant lias en interest 
in such property. 

The Federal Government reimburses local Boards $5^*00 a month for each case aided. The 
State pays two-thirds of the balance and the remainder is paid by the local community. 
During the past year Old Age Assistance came under the settlement laws. Five years continu- 
ous residence in a community without public aid constituted a settlement and any balance of 
the aid rendered after Federal and State reimbursement was charged to the town or city of 
settlement. In th= event a person did not have a legal settlement, the State is billed for 
the balance. 

The Board, in its budget reauest, does not include the Federal share, as this amount by law 
is set up in a separate account and can be used only by the Board of Public Welfare for the 
Old A^e Assistance program. The Board, in its budget request, must raise the State and other 
cities and towns share, as their payments are returned directly to the Town's Excess end 
Deficiency account and is used by the town. The assessors, however, anticipate this reim- 
bursement based on the prior year's returns, and it does not adversely affect the tax rate. 

During the past year the law which most affected 0. A. A. was a 5.1$ cost of living in- 
crease per month, plus $1.00 per month increase to the Leisure Time Activity, making a total 
of $5.00 a month for this item in the budget. Another change in the 0. A. A. laws during 
1963 was a revision of Chapter ll8A of the General Laws, wnereby settlement means thet the 
community wherein the applicant is residing at time of application is responsible for the 
cost of any aid rendered after Federal end State reimbursements. During the year 1963* 82 
cases were aided under this program at a total cost of $71,030.59. 



AID TO FAMILIES WITH DEPENDENT CHILDREN 

Aid to Families with Dependent Children is another Federally-sponsored category administered 
by law through the local Boards of Public Welfare to aid children that are deprived of 
parental support through desertion, mutual or legal separation, divorce, incarceration, 
death, disability, or unemployment of the perent. 

The Federal reimbursement on this program is $20.50 per person, State reimbursement is one- 
third of the total expenditure. The local community pays the balance for the aid rendered. 
The Board does not include the Federal share in its budget request. The Town must raise the 



59 



State's share and the local share, because the State's share is returned to the Town's Ex- 
cess and Deficiency Fund. There is no settlement required on this program. However, the 
children must have resided in the Commonwealth for one year prior to application. 

During 1963* members of this Agency appeared in various Courts a total of 39 times and were 
97% successful in all these appearances against delinquent fathers in our efforts to seek 
guilty judgments for non-support and subsequent support orders for their families. Receipts 
from this source amounted to $10,753*00 for 1963, an increase of 63.6$ over 1962. During 
1963, h-0 families were aided under this category in Wilmington with a total expenditure of 

$55,U68.73. 

During 1963 this program also received a 5,1% mandatory cost of living increase in their 
semi-monthly grants. The State and Federal Governments are also pressing for more services 
in this category. Services being stressed are homemaking, counseling, physical and mental 
health, education, reconciliation of parents and rehabilitation. 



DISABILITY ASSISTANCE 

Disability Assistance is another Federally-sponsored State plan administered by law by the 
Boards of Public Welfare. It requires the local Boards to aid persons who have been de- 
clared permanently and totally disabled by the Medical Review Team of the State Department 
of Public Welfare and who are in need. Need is determined by budgetary standards set by the 
State Department of Public Welfare. The Federal reimbursement for money expended in this 
category is $1|6.50 a month per case, and the Town's share is 25% of the total cost each 
month. The balance is reimbursed by the State Department of Public Welfare. The seme man 
of financing is used as in Old Age Assistance and Aid to Families with Dependent Children. 
The only major change on this program during 1963 was the 5*1% increase granted other 
programs . 

During the year 1963, 10 cases were aided on this category. Total expenditure, for 1963 was 
$9,798. 07. 



MEDICAL ASSISTANCE FOR THE AGED 

Medical Assistance for the Aged is also a Federally-sponsored State pl8n administered by the 
local Boards of Public Vie If are. This program was born in I960 when changes made under the 
Social Security Act established this category under the Secretary of Health, Education and 
Welfare. The bill, as passed at that level, recognized a need for medical care for aged 
persons. It, as in other Federal and State programs, requires local Boards to aid persons 
over 65, who are medically indigent and reside in the Commonwealth. No settlement is re- 
quired under this category. 

Under Chapter 78I of the Acts of 1960 the other requirements briefly are as follows: Aged 
persons 65 or over, who reside in the Commonwealth, are entitled to medical 8ssistence, pro- 
vided they do not have an income, if single, of more than $150.00 a month, or if married, 
$225.00 a month, and providing further that if single they do not have bank deposits, securi 
ties, cash on hand and/or similar assets amounting to more than $2,000. ; if married, more 
than $3,000. Persons eligible for this form of assistance shall be entitled to part or all 
of the cost of (1) in-patient hospital ward care; (2) public medical institution services; 
(3) nursing home care; (U) physician's services; (5) out-patient or clinical services; (6) 
nursing services; (7) physical therapy and related services; (8) dental services; (9) home 
health care services; (10) laboratory and x-ray services; (11) prescribed drugs, eye glasses 
dentures and other prosthetic devices; (12) diagnostic screening and preventive services; 
(13) any other care or remedial care recognized under the law of the Commonwealth, and (II4.) 
other medical care in accordance with the Department of Public Welfare Medical Care Plan. 

Reimbursement for care under this program is fifty per cent of all monies expended by the 
Federal government, two -thirds of the balance by the State, the remaining one-third balance 
to be assumed by the local community. During the year 1963, there were no major changes for 
this program. A total of 75 cases were aided during the year at a total cost of $5l,U92.75» 



60 



GENERAL RELIEF 



This program requires local Boards to meet the community's statutory obligation to relieve 
a person in need. The decisions on who shall be aided and the amount given is left entirely 
to the local Board's discretion. Unlike the Federal programs where the final decision rests 
with the State through an appeal process, the local board makes the final decision. The 
local Boards, through their policies and decisions, invariably attempt to reflect community 
thinking. The financing of this program has always been a direct cost to the Town, except 
for cases that have settlements in other communities or no legal settlement. The last two 
exceptions means that the local community received full reimbursement for aid rendered from 
the place of settlement, or if unsettled from the State Department of Public Welfare. How- 
ever, during the past year the General Court under Chapter 726 amended Chapter 117» whereby 
the settlement lews were repealed. This law became effective January l f 1961).. The repeal 
of the settlement laws means that the community in which the person is residing at time of 
application is responsible for their cere. The law was also further amended under Section 
19A and now provides that the State will reimburse each community for 20% of the coat of 
General Relief. This amendment also to become effective on January 1, 1961^. 

During the year 1963» 37 cases were aided under this category with a total expenditure of 
$12,265.18. 



ADMINISTRATION 

Administration costs cover all expenditures by the Board to administer the five programs 
under its jurisdiction; namely, Old Age Assistance, Medical Assistance for the Aged, Disa- 
l bility Assistance, Aid to Families with Dependent Children and General Relief. The reim- 
bursement formula for Federally-sponsored programs on Administration was revised several 
times during the year. At the close of 1963, the formula was approximately as follows: 
$0% by the Federal Government, 2%% by the State and the remaining 2%% to be paid by the 
local community. Administration expenses applied to General Relief are not reimbursable, 
but these costs were only a small fraction of the total expenditure. Federal funds, as in 
the other programs, are restricted by law for the sole use of Administration. The State's 
share is returned to the Excess and Deficiency Fund and is used by the Town for any purpose. 



GENERAL COMMENTS 



Most administrators of local Boards sre earnestly trying to improve the image of Public 
Welfare end we seem to have made some progress to the point that we are being recognized as 
an accepted useful Agency in the community. It is the belief of this Board that a detailed 
report such as this, even though it is obviously condensed, is expected by the taxpayers 
of Wilmington and gives every one a better insight into the functions of the Agency and the 
reasons for the Board's expenditures. 

The Boerd again wishes to extend its thanks to the following Town Departments: the Town 
Manager's office for his co-operation regarding placement of unemployed fathers; the Police 
Department for their help and co-operation in our dealings with the Courts; the Fire Depart- 
ment for their many courtesies and the use of the ambulance; and the Highway Department's 
co-operation and help regarding the servicing of the Welfare car. The following organiza- 
tions also deserve a public vote of thanks for their generosity to the needy during l%3s 
the Community Fund, Salvation Army, Jaycee-ettes, Jaycees, Wilmington Lions Club, the 
Brownies, Cub Scouts (Pack 56), Diamond Crystal Salt Company, Controller's Department, AVCO, 
Wilmington and the AVCO Advanced Research and Development Division, Lowell. 

The Welfare Board hopes that the few words printed on these pages will give some meaning and 
understanding to the people of Wilmington of the work performed by their Board of Public 
We lf are 

This report was prepared for the local Board of Public Welfare by its Director of Public 
Assistance, Walter F. Coleman. 



61 



Jury List 



(Revised - August 30, 1963) 



Name 


Res idence 


Occupa tion 


Abate, Louis A. 


j> ( Ciien Koau 


Grounds Keeper 


Ahern, Donald A. 


VLj. (j.Len noacl 


Electronic Technician 


Aii^n, 'alter r. -Jr. 


p nidge rtoac 


Display Supervisor 


"R a. Xf m& n , oauie i v . 


( f onurcn )tresi 


House wife 


Anderson, Ralph H. Jr. 
•»-App, Margaret M. 


1^6 Shawsheen /.venue 


Civil Engineer 


i1 i?i> iiein otreet 


Housewife 


Ayotte, Francis L, 


63 Glen Road 


Supervisor 


Baker, Wesley II. 


I). Cedar 1 Street 


T i nt er 


Balkus, Florence A. 


r)0L|. /voburn Street 


Secre tary 


Barry, Leo G. 


Ohendler Road 


Accounting Analyst 


Beers, William A. 


3 Truman 'toed 


Transmission Maintenance 


Begonis, Martin S. 


12 oeaar Street 


Machinist 


Bennett, Gertrude H, 


239 Midilesex Avenue 


Secretary 


-"-Bertwell, Florence F. 


3U3 Chestnut Street 


Housewife 


Billings, Weyman H, 


21 Strout Avenue 


Engineer 


---Black, Pauline R. 


8I4. Church Street 


Hou3ewif e 


-"-Blake, Helen C. 


95 Clark Street 


Housewife 


Blake, James D. 


95 Clark Street 


Credit Clerk 


Bowmen, noli is B. 


22 Fairmeadow Road 


Printer- Pres3 man 


-"-Boyle n, Marion C. 


22 u illiams Avenue 


Housewife 


Bradford, Milton L. Jr. 


12 Dorothy Avenu9 


Claims Examiner 


Bremen, Clifford C. 


\\. Fairmeadow Road 


Industrial Electrician 


---Bremen, Merion V, 


I4. Fairmeadow Road 


Stetistical Clerk-Sales 


Brezell, Charles C. 


103 Middlesex Avenue 


Trailer Truck Driver 


Breen, Thomes J. 


77 Middlesex Avenue 


Industrial Sales Rep. 


-Ji-Burke, Dorothy A. 


10 Westdale Avenue 


Telephone Operator 


Burns, Robert A. 


2 Lockwood Road 


Warehouseman 


Bussell, Howard A. 


5 Cetherine Avenue 


Auto Mechanic 


Butler, Malcolm S. 


13 ''est Street 


Rating Examiner 


Butt, Gilbert A. 


1 Deyton Road 


Safety & Manpower 


Butt, Raymond 


28 Linda Road 


Draftsman 


-*Butt, Rose 


1 Dayton Roed 


Housewife 


Carter, John E. 


15 Railroad Avenue 


Stockman 


Casey, Helen R. 


2 Main Street 


Switchboard Operator 


Chamberlin, Winston S. 


11 Glen Road 


Shoe Findings Super. 


Childs, William G. 


8 Linda Road 


C. 0. Switchman 


Clinch, Ethel J. 


67 Chestnut Street 


At home 


^Cromwell, Effie L. 


35 Adams Street 


Stock Clerk 


-*Crotty, Clara E. 


6 Silverhurst Avenue 


Housewife 


Cullen, William H. Jr. 


15 Glen Roed 


Public Information Rep. 


Davey, James J. 


10 Fairmeadow Road 


Teletype Repairman 


•H-Dawe, Marguerite M. 


39 Columbia Street 


Asst. Teacher 


Dayton, "illiam P. 
Derby, Ralph F. Jr. 


2U4. Burlington Avenue 


Senior Electrical Designer 


207 Wildwood Street 


Department Head 


■H-Doerfler, Betty Jane 


U59 Salem Street 


Quality Control Inspector 


Durkee, James J. 


500 Salem Street 
62 


Pharmac ist 



JURY LIST : 
Name 
Enos, Peter 

Everett, Warren E. Jr. 
•::-Fairweather , Mary Jane 

Fenlon, Beatrice E. 

Fielding, Doris M. 

Gardner, Thomas W. V. 
-::-Gaskill, Kathleen M. 

Gilbert, Charles N. 

Gordon, Julius 

Goss, Walter 
-::-Gould, Phyllis E„ 

Gouvea, John Jr. 

Gunn, Richard T. 

Hadley, May 
i Haines, Charles B. 

Ham, Francis N., Jr. 

Higginbotham, Madeline B. 
•ttHoban, Cecelia E. 

Hoban, Francis S. Jr. 
■M-Johnson, Mary J. 
-*Jolly, Gladys A. 

Kavanaugh, Paul W. 

Keane, Richard E. 
-::-Kelley, Helen B. 

Kelley, Kenneth G. 
#Kelmon, Mildred E. 
-«-Kenney, Thelma R. 
^Kitchener, Ruth M. 

Kleynen, Louis L. Jr. 
•--LaRivee, Marjorie E. 

Leavitt, Kenneth R. 

LeBlanc, Edgar 
•"•Lewis, Carrie L. 
-"-Lienhard, Ivy A. 

Lingenf elter , George G. Jr. 
-*Low, Anna M. 

MacFeeley, Patricia A. 
-sMarfleet, Catherine 
-*Masella, Juanita G. 

McCormick, William J. 

McDermott, Richard E. 
tfMcMahon, Viola J. 

McMenmen, George C. Jr. 

Melzar, Miriam Jane 

Merenda, Francis S. 

Moore, Arthur R. 

Mortelliti, Nunzio F. 

Myrstad, Birger 
^Nichols, Esther H. 

O'Reilly, Gerald 

Osberg, William H. 

Ouellette, Alfred G. 

Owler, Warren D. Jr. 

Paglia, Joseph A. 

Palmer, Richard 

Parsons, Raymond T. 

Razey, Donald P. 

Russell, William H. 



Residence 


Occupation 


8 Hillside Way 


Machinist 


5 Ferguson Road 


Planner 


21). Liberty Street 


Housewi f e 


I4.7 Burnap Street 


Telephone Operator 


111 Vest Street 


At home 


725 r 'oburn Street 


Truck Driver 


17 Beacon Street 


Housewife 


13 Church Street 


Tool & Die Maker 


Oak Street 


Electronic Equip. Constr. 


7i|. Salem Street 


Security Guard 


12 Oakridge Circle 


Housewife 


33 Woburn Street 


Asst. to Master Mechanic 


127 Church Street 


Machine Shop Estimator 


61+ Boutwell Street 


At home 


I4. Ridge Road 


Auto Service Shop Foreman 


McDonald Road 


Senior Research Technician 


33 Adams Street 


Ret ired 


16 School Street 


Housewife 


16 School Street 


Asst. Head Meat Cutter 


Bellevue Avenue 


Sewer 


26 High Street 


Housewife 


11|_ Kelley Road 


General Accountant 


6 North Street 


Inside Sales 


I(.2l4. Middlesex Avenue 


Housewife 


I4.2I4. Middlesex Avenue 


Professor of Music Ed. 


15>6 Middlesex Avenue 


Housewife 


16 Lawrence Street 


Housewife 


116 Aldrich Road 


Housewife 


288 Salem Street 


Route Foreman 


61). Concord Street 


Secretary 


I4.I Pleasant Street 


Salesman 


6 Parker Street 


Artist Draftsman 


72 Church Street 


Part-time Collector 


Elwood Road 


Housewife 


Concord Street 


Indus. Health Director 


585 Woburn Street 


Custom House Broker 


I4.3 Burnap Street 


Legal Secretary 


27 Boutwell Street 


Housewife 


5 Walker Street 


Housewife 


Kilmarnock Street 


Welder 


1 Arlene Avenue 


Journeyman Cable Splicer 


15 Floradale Avenue 


Housewife 


22 Marcus Road 


Manufacturing Expeditor 


I4.7 Lake Street 


Secretary 


1 Glenview Road 


Staff Electronics Engineer 


5 Ledgewood Road 


Foremen 


12 Hathaway Road 


Foreman 


Ballardvale Street 


Fish Cutter 


7 Powder House Circle 


Retired Registered Nurse 


wvixqwoou ooreet 


iDUIlIliOai II UU1 I oaUoI 


19A Lawrence Street 


Shop Foreman 


l\. Westdale Avenue 


Paint Mixer 


Concord Street 


Plumber 


101 Nichols Street 


Tool & Gage Inspector 


I4. Chapman Avenue 


Appliance Repairman 


3 Hilltop Road 


Bench Assembler 


l\.6 Adams Street 


Shipper 


10 Wildwood Street 


Asst. Manager 


63 





JURY LIST: 



Name 

Sanborn, Lulu E. 

Spring, Walker C. 
■frSteveley, Viola J. 

Steveley, Wilbur T. 

Sullivan, Edward J. 

Tarricone, Ralph E. 

Tighe, James Donald 

Traer, William 

Trickett, David W. 

Tupper, Albert A. 
tfTworably, Rita Marie 

Watters, James G. 

Waugh, John J. 

Webb, William R . 

Webster, David H. 

Webster, George L. 

Weed, John E. 

Welch, Robert E. 

Wilson, John L., Jr. 

Wilson, Marjorie E. 

Woolaver, Howard C. 



Residence 

146 Church Street 
21 Thurston Avenue 
5 Harris Street 
5 Harris Street 
38 Grove Avenue 
11 Clark Street 
H|J| Chestnut Street 
611 Woburn Street 

11 Suncrest Avenue 
26 Linda Road 

12 Marjorie Road 
25 Grant Street 
36 Lowell Street 
59 Lowell Street 
II4. Dorothy Avenue 
52 Andover Street 

2 Cunningham Street 
8 Hamlin Lane 
Dunton Road 
19 Shawsheen Avenue 
180 Woburn Street 



Occupation 
Unemployed 

Insurance Underwriter 

Secretary 

Manager 

Distribution Clerk 

Bookbinder 

Bookbinder 

Self-employed 

Sup e r int e nde nt 

Sales Representative 

Housewife 

Material Handler 

Sales 

Manager 

Electrical Designer 

Printing Salesman 

Maintenance 

Engineer 

Salesman 

At home 

Asst. Chief Underwriter 



#indioates married woman 



Permanent Building Committee 



The Permanent Building Committee wishes to report the awarding of a contract to 

Sewell & Smith Construction Company for the construction of an elementary school on Woburn 

Street, in the amount of $518, Qi+i|..71 . The work on the school is progressing favorably. 

The past year has seen a change in the personnel of the committee, and we owe a vote of 
thanks to Mr. Niles, Mr. Hanke and Mr. McLain for the work that they have done in the past. 
The new members are Mr. Robert Barry, Mr. Ralph Currier and Mr. William Harrison. These 
present members bring a wealth of experience and knowledge to the committee, and it is felt 
that their services will be appreciated by the Town. 

New school sites have been investigated by the committee in the West Wilmington area with 
emphasis on land behind the Boutwell Street School and land on Hopkins Street and Shawsheen 
Avenue • 



Board of Health 



Board of Health : 

Mrs. Msrion Boylen, Chairman 

Mr. A. C. Walker, Jr. 

Mr. E. T. Driscoll 



Personnel : 

Ernest F. Romano, M.S.P.H., Health Agent 
Anne Butters, R.N., Public Health Nurse 
Gerald Fagan, M.D., Public Health Physician 
Leo LeBlanc, Animal & Slaughtering Inspector 
Simon Cutter, Legal Consultant 
Gardiner Lester,. D.V.M. , Veterinarian 



No changes in personnel occurred during the year. The annihilation of Polio, which was be- 
gun the previous year, received top priority in 1963. The new oral polio vaccine was made 
available at numerous clinics to all age groups in town. 

A vaccination clinic for protection against smallpox was started in April for preschool 
children. The monthly immunization clinic, which was inaugurated in December of 1962, was 
fairly well attended in 1963. 

The General Health Program continued in 1963 to be diverse and comprehensive. New laws were 
enacted pertaining to Maternal and Child Health programs, and the Tuberculosis Hospitaliza- 
tion program underwent revisions. 

A . Communicable Disease Control; 



1, Monthly Immunization Clinic : 

The monthly immunization clinic formerly held at Doming Way was moved to new 
quarters at the Stavely house during the year. Clinics were held the first 
Tuesday of the month from 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Eight clinics were held 
for protection against whooping cough, diptheria and tetanus. Clinics will 
continue to be given the first Tuesday of each month and any of the required 
first, second, third or booster doses will be given at any clinic. 



2. Smallpox Clinic 

For the first time in April, a smallpox vaccination clinic was held. Atten- 
dance was overwhelming. Two hundred and fifty children were vaccinated. This 
clinic will continue to be held on an annual basis. 

3. Polio Immunization Clinic : 

The general oral polio program begun in 1962 was expanded and completed in 
1963. Type II vaccine was given to those who started the series the previous 
year. The complete aeries was made available to all others including adults. 
A special effort was made to immunize the elderly at Deming Way. Eight clinics 
were held, five of which were on Sunday. A total of 11,186 doses were given. 
There were no cases of polio reported in Town. 



Booster doses given 
Children completing series 




1962 
90 
35 



32 



Total attendance. 



98 



65 



Polio Immunization Clinic (continued): 



2153 
700? 
2026 



Type T 
Type II 
Type III 



Anti-Rabies Clinic : 

The dog immunization clinic for rabies was held again during the year at the 
Fire Station. Attendance dropped off due to rainy weather. Four hundred and 
fifty-nine dogs were immunized, as compared with five hundred and forty-eight 
for the previous year. A total of $3U4»25 was collected as innoculation fees. 



B. Public Health Nursing : 

1. Health Visits: 



This part of the Public Health Nurse's program is a visiting nurse service. 
It includes services associated with the care of the sick and is offered only 
under the direction of a physician. It is available to any one living in the 
town. 

2. General Health Visits : 

A total of one hundred and twenty-three visits were made in the interest of 
child and adult health. These visits are made for many various reasons, some 
of which include prenatal, communicable disease, new babies, families with 
health and related problems. In many instances, families are unfamiliar or 
unaware of facilities and resources available to them in time of need. It is 
the aim of this service to acquaint families with these facilities and re- 
sources and to help them to help themselves. 

3. Day Care Centers : 

Late in 1963» new legislation was enacted by the State Health Department rela- 
tive to Day Care Centers. The State had been designated as the licensing 
authority except in those communities that request authority and have qualified 
personnel to carry out the complex Day Care Program. The Board of Health, who 
will continue to license these centers, participated actively by attending 
hearing and meetings on the proposed legislation. It is anticipated that by 
the middle of 1961j., preparations will have been made to put the new program 
into operation. Periodic visits were made to the local day care centers. 

Ij.. Premature Births : 

The law governing premature births also underwent changes during 1963. Settle- 
ments relative to these have been done away with. Hospital payments are now 
made jointly by the local Board of Health and the State Health Department. 
Twenty-six premature births were reported to the local Board of Health. Finan- 
cial assistance for hospitalization was granted to four cases. A total of 
$1,0I(.5.50 was expended for hospitalization care. Assistance is given by the 
Board only in those cases where need is established. 

5© Tuberculosis Report for 1963 : 

Total number of active cases on register 12/31/63 H 

Total number of cases hospitalized on 12/31/63 1 

Number of new cases reported in 1963 • • 3 

Number of cases moved away in 1963 ♦ 2 

Number placed on inactive list ..... .. 3 



Public Health Nursing visits 
Fees collected for visits . , 




66 



Tuberculosis Report for 1963 (continued) 



Number of diagnosed cases visited 13 

Number of visits made to diagnosed cases 11§ 

Total number of visits (cases, contact, suspects) lij.2 

Number of visits to Middlesex County Sanatorium 10 



Regionalization of Tuberculosis Hospitals took place during 1963. The number 
of tuberculosis hospitals was reduced from 18 to Changes were also made 

in apportioning hospital costs to Boards of Health. In the spring, the State 
Department of Public Health sponsored a tuberculosis program at Essex Sana- 
torium which consisted of four lectures. These lectures were aimed at informing 
public health nurses in the newer trends being employed in the fight to eradi- 
cate tuberculosis. For 1961j., plans have been made for a general x-ray program 
throughout the town with a Mobile Unit. This will be coordinated with a 
tuberculin testing program in the schools. 



C . Environmental Health : 

1. Water Supply : 

Samples are collected and tested for drinking quality and recommendations are 
made for protection, location, and chlorination of water supplies. A good 
public health practice is to have well water tested twice a year. This service 
is available through the Board of Health, free of charge. 



Private Wells 

Water samples analyzed ........... 108 

Chemical analysis. Sk- 

Town water 13 



2. Milk Sanitation : 

During the year milk and cream samples are collected throughout the town either 
in food establishments or from dairy trucks. Analyses are made to determine 
adequacy of pasteurization and handling practice of these products. Notice of 
results of laboratory test are sent to restaurant operators and to milk plants. 

Dairies licensed 18 

Milk and cream analysis 88 

3. Food Sanitation : 

A general improvement in food sanitation has been made in 1963. This has been 
brought about by the cooperation of owners of the facilities. School cafeterias 
continue to maintain high standards of cleanliness. Periodic inspections of all 
food establishments continue to be made. A program of swab testing to determine 
bacterial counts of eating and drinking utensils will be started in 1961j.» New 
food establishment permits included one temporary and one permanent. 

if. Sewage Disposal Sanitation : 

A total of 38$ more sewerage permits were issued over the previous year. These 
figures reflect the increase in new housing construction. Fees totaled $998. 



Total Sewerage 
New Dwellings 
Old Dwellings 
Commercial 
Industrial 



Permits Issued 




1962 

T5~ 



11 

28 
3 
$ 



1961 

108 
27 
3 
3 



67 



5. Refuse Disposal : 



A new dump contract was negotiated commencing April 1963 for a three-year 
period. The starting period was changed from January to April to allow con- 
sideration of this appropriation at the annual town meeting. Only one complaint 
was received by the Board of Health concerning the dump. The operation of the 
dump was carried on satisfactorily during the year. A new contract was also 
signed for the collection of garbage for a three-year period for the sum of 
$13,900. The contract expires April 30, 1966. 

6. Recreation Area Sanitation: 



During the summer period, special attention is given to the local recreation 
areas. Water samples are collected on a weekly basis at Silver Lake and other 
private bathing areas. Results of bacterial analysis are published in the 
local newspapers. A pre-opening inspection of the local camps is made each 
year. 



Water Supply - Drinking. 
Water Samples - Swimming 



5 

22 



7. Housing Sanitation : 



The Board of Health continues to be cognizant of the existing housing probl 
Many problems are examined jointly with the Building Inspector. An attempt 
is made to persuade property owners to raze those houses that are unoccupie 
and are considered unfit for human habitation. 



em. 

d 



Miscellaneous Inspections : 

Nuisances • • 2? 

Piggeries 9 

Stables 93 

Town Dump 10 

Rodent Control I|. 

Recreation Camps .. 2 



D. Permits and Licenses : 

The following licenses and permits were issued. Pees totaled $1,098.50 



Sewerage Permits 

Milk Dairy Licenses 

Milk Dairy Store 

Recreational Camps 

Kindergarten 

Piggeries 

Pood Permits 

Funeral Directing 

Retail Manufacture Ice Cream 

Wholesale Manufacture Ice Cream 

Refuse Transportation 

Stable Licenses 

Oleomargarine 



1963 


1962 


213 




18 


19 


25 


25 


2 


2 


2 


2 


9 


10 


29 


30 


3 


3 


1 


1 


1 


1 


13 


35 


13 


2k 


8 


11 



68 



E, Laboratory : 



The laboratory received certification by the State in 1963 for water analysis. 
The following analyses were made: 

Swimming Water 22 

Water Samples ..... 162 

Milk and Cream Analysis 88 



The Board sincerely wishes to thank all those persons who offered their much needed assis- 
tance in the various programs and clinics during the year. Our thanks to the Housing 
Authority for their generous use of Deming Way, to the Superintendent of Schools and School 
Nurses for all their cooperation, and to the Fire Chief and his department for their help 
during the Dog Immunization Clinic, 



Animal Inspector 



Dog Bite3 Reported 8? 

Dogs Showing Physical Signs of Rabies 

Animals Submitted to Laboratory for Examination 3 

(All biting animals were quarantined for 
the period of time prescribed by law. ) 

Animals Quarantined 87 

Animals Released from Quarantine 87 

Dogs Released from Interstate Shipment 
Laboratory Report: 

Positive 

Negative 3 

Premises Keeping Domestic Animals Inspected 61 

Cattle Inspected 110 

Horses Inspected 8l 

Swine Inspected 2507 

Goats Inspected 7 

Sheep Inspected 11 

Cattle Released from Interstate Shipment 2 

Cattle Reacting to the Tuberculin Test 
Cattle Reacting to Brucellosis Disease Blood 

Test 

Premises Keeping Animals Checked 35 

Animals Checked D4J4. 



All special work assigned to me by the Department of Livestock Disease Control and the 
Board of Health was attended to promptly. 



SLAUGHTERING INSPECTOR: No slaughtering in Town 

No calls for personal livestock slaughtering 



69 



Town Meetings 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - January 21, 1963 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 



Meeting called to order at 8:15 P.M. by the Moderator, Mr. Simon Cutter. To either of the 
Constables of the Town of Wilmington: 

GREETINGS: - In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and in the manner prescribed 
in the By-Laws of said Town, you are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of 
the Town qualified to vote in Town affairs to meet and assemble (at this point Mr. Donald C. 
Kidder moved to dispense with further reading of the warrant and this motion was so adopted. 

The Moderator stated that he would not read each article but only refer to it by number if 
there were no objections. None were offered therefor this policy was adopted. 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to purchase or 
take by eminent domain for the purpose of erecting a school thereon certain parcels of land 
off Woburn Street described as follows: 

Beginning at a point at the northernmost end of the center line of Marcia Road; thence run- 
ning N85-ll|-10E a distance of six hundred seventy-six and twenty-eight hundredths (676.28) 
feet to a point on the westerly sideline of Woburn Street, thence turning and running by sa 
Woburn Street a distance of two hundred and thirty-one and sixty- two hundredths (231.62) fe 
on a bearing of N01-56-12W; thence still by said Woburn Street a distance of two hundred 
j ninety-nine and thirty-three hundredths (299.33) feet at a bearing of N21-26-20E; thence 

„ still along said street a distance of eighteen and seven hundredths (18.07) feet on a bear- 

ing of Nll|-5i|-30E; thence still by said Woburn Street a distance of one hundred fourteen and 
forty-two hundredths (III4..I4.2) feet on a bearing of N06-29-00E; thence still by said street a 
distance of forty-one and twenty- two hundredths (lj.1.22) feet on a bearing of due north; 
thence still by said street a distance of eighty-eight and seventy-seven hundredths (83.77) 
feet on a bearing of N02-59-L|.6W; thence again by said Woburn Street a distance of eighty and 
ninety-eight hundredths (80.98) feet at a bearing of N05-32-00W; thence turning away from 
i said Woburn Street and running at a bearing of No9-lj.l-lU|-W; a distance of thirty- three and 

eighty-seven hundredths (33*87) feet; thence continuing and on a bearing of N8o-[).3-36W a 
distance of thirty-eight and twenty-five hundredths (38.25) feet; thence running along a 
bearing of N87-33-52W a distance of one hundred three and eighty-one hundredths (103.81) fee 
thence running along a bearing of N87-08-58W a distance of two hundred one and forty-nine 
hundredths (2OI.I4.9) feet; thence on a bearing of N8L1.-3i4.-l6W a distance of one hundred twelve 
and fourteen hundredths (112. li^.) feet; thence running on a bearing of N88-5lj.-03W a distance 
of one hundred twenty-six and sixteen hundredths (126.16) feet: thence turning and running 
on a bearing of S01-17-07E a distance of one hundred eighty-eight and fifty-nine hundredths 
(188.59) feet; thence on a bearing of S03-25-14-7E a distance of one hundred twenty-five and 
seventy-one hundredths (125.71) feet; thence on a bearing of S02-3U-32E a distance of two 
hundred ninety-nine and seventeen hundredths (299.17) feet; thence turning and running on a 
bearing of S87-55-38W a distance of five hundred fifty-eight and twenty-eight hundredths 
(558.28) feet to a point on the easterly sideline of Linda Road; thence continuing on the 
same bearing another forty and zero hundredths (I4O.OO) feet to a point on the westerly side- 
line of Linda Road, said points being the end of 3aid Linda Road; thence turning and running 
on a bearing of "02-0i|-20E a distance of three hundred forty-eight and zero hundredths 
(3I4.8.OO) feet; said line being a continuation of the westerly sideline of Linda Road; going 



70 



;o a point in the center of a stream; thence turning and running on a bearing of N80-57-32E a 
listance of one hundred thirty-seven and seventy-seven hundredths (137.77) feet along said 
itream to the intersection of another stream; thence continuing along the first mentioned 
itream a distance of two hundred forty-one and twenty hundredths (2l|.1.20) feet on a bearing 
>f N8[(.-13-39E to the point of beginning. Said area to contain 15.5 acres more or less con- 
sisting of three parcels and shown on a plan entitled "Plan of Land in Wi lmington , Massachu- 
letts" dated January 11, 1963 all according to a plan on file in the office of the Town 
'lerk, and to see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for acouir- 
j.ng said land off Woburn Street by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by borrowing 
>r to do anything in relation thereto. On request of the Permanent Building Committee, 
finance Committee - recommended - $13,650.00 

lotion by Mr. Erwin Hanke, Chairman of the Permanent Building Committee: "I move that the 
?own ^ote to authorize the Selectmen to take by eminent domain or purchase, for the purpose 
)f erecting a school thereon, certain parcels of land described as stated above and that the 
jum of $l8,65>0.00 be raised and appropriated by taxation for the costs of said taking." 
/oted unanimously by voice and so stated by the Moderator. 

ARTICLE 2 : To see if the Town will vote to authorize the p ermanent Building Committee to pre- 
pare preliminary plans, specifications and cost estimates pertaining to a new elementary 
'school of approximately fifteen (15) rooms, and for said purpose to appropriate a sum of 
■noney to be raised by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by bond issue, or other- 
wise, or do anything in relation thereto. On reouest of the Permanent Building Committee, 
finance Committee recommended $7»5>00.00. 

Motion by Mr. Erwin Hanke, Chairman of the Permanent Building Committee: "I move that the 
Town vote to authorize the Permanent Building Committee to expend an amount not to exceed 
$7,500.00 for the purpose of preparing preliminary plans for an elementary school of approxi- 
nately 15 rooms and that said sum be raised and appropriated from taxation. Voted unani- 
nously by voice and so stated by the Moderator, 

/oted to adjourn at 8:35 °.M. There were Three Hundred Thirty-five (335) voters checked on 
the voting list. 

A true copy: 

Attest: (Mrs.) Esther L. Russell 

Town Clerk 



71 



WARRANT FOR THE ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - March 2, 1963 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 



TO: 



Either of the Constables of the Town of Wilmington: 



GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and in the manner prescribed i 
the By-Laws of said Town, you are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of the 
Town qualified to vote in Town affairs to meet and assemble at the High School Cafeteria, 
Saturday, the 2nd Day of March, A.D. 1963 at 9:1+5 o'clock in the forenoon, the polls to be 
opened at 10:00 A.M., and shall be closed at 8:00 P.M., for the election of Town Offices: 

ARTICLE 1 . Two Selectmen for the term of three years; Two members of the School Committee 
for the term of three years; One Moderator for the term of one year; and One member of the 
Wilmington Housing Authority for the term of five years. You are hereby further required 
and directed to notify and warn the said inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington who are qusl 
fied to vote on elections and town affairs therein to assemble subsequently and meet in Tow: 
Meeting at the High School Gymnasium, Church Street, in said Town of Wilmington on Saturday 
the 9th Day of March, A.D., 1963 at 1:30 P.M., then and there to act on the following 
Articles : 

In accordance with the above warrant, the meeting was called to order by the Clerk, Mr. 
Simon Cutter at 9:L|.5 A.M., as much of the Warrant as is noted above was read and on a motioi 
by Mr. Harold Melzar it was voted to dispense with further reading of said Warrant. 

The ballot boxes were examined by the Warden, Town Clerk, Election Clerk and the Police 
Officer on duty. Both ballot boxes were found to be empty and the register on each indi- 
cated 00000. Each ballot box was then locked and the keys given to the Police Officer. 

The election officers were sworn to the faithful performance of their duties. 

The Warden signed a receipt for 5700 ballots, the number said to be contained in the box of 
ballots which were delivered to him. The ballots were delivered to the Ballot Clerks. 

The Polls were declared open at 10:00 A.M. The Polls were declared closed at 8:00 P.M. 

There were Two Thousand Four Hundred and Twenty-eight (2l|28) ballots cast. 

All the ballots cast were sorted, counted, recorded and declaration thereof made, as by law 
is directed, and were for the following, namely: 



Selectman - Three Year3 

Elected Charles H. Black, One Thousand One Hundred Nineteen 

Elected Rene J. LaRivee, One Thousand One Hundred Sixty-two 

Lloyd C. Bender, III, Nine Hundred Fifty Nine 

Charles P. Greene, One Hundred Fifty-four 

Roland I. Wood, One Thousand Three 

Blanks, Four Hundred Fifty-nine 



Voted 
1119 
1162 
959 

1003 

.1+59 



School Committee - Three Years 

Elected John F. Hartnett, Eight Hundred Eighty-eight 

Elected Richard E. Keane, One Thousand Eighty-seven 

Arthur J. Brewster, Seven Hundred seven 
C. Homer Coursey, One Hundred forty-five 
Walter J. Gustus, One Hundred Sixty-eight 
M. Flora Kasabuski, Six Hundred Twenty-one 
Edward F. Kelley, Three Hundred Eighty-six 
John W. McCann, Two Hundred Ninety-one 
Joseph A. Paglia, One Hundred Thirteen 
Blanks, Four Hundred fifty 



1087 
707 

m 

163 
621 
386 
291 
113 
1+50 



72 




oderator - One Year 

lected Simon Cutter, Two Thousand Eighty-four 

Blanks, Three Hundred Thirty-nine 
Others, ^ive 



ilmington Housing Authority - Five Years 
lected Edwin F. Forrest, Nine Hundred Thirty-eight 

Charles ?. Greene, Two Hundred Twenty-three 
George G. Lingenf elter , Jr., One Hundred >:ighty-one 
James R. Miceli, Seven Hundred Forty-two 
Thomas J. Reidy, Jr., One Hundred Sixty-six 
Blanks, One Hundred Seventy-eight 



Voted 

339 
5 



938 
223 
181 
71*2 
166 
178 
2W 



K ballot box register read 
Z ballot box register read 



1176 
1252 
2W 



There were four {\\) spoiled ballots. 



ill the elected officials who were present were immediately sworn to the faithful performance 
if their duties by the Town Clerk. Those elected officials who were absent on election 
light were qualified on Monday March I)., 1963. 



ittest: 



(Mrs.) Esther L. Russell 
Town Clerk 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - March 9, 1963 
HIGH SCHOOL GYMNASIUM 

?he Adjourned Annual Town Meeting was called to order by the Moderator, Mr. Simon Cutter at 
.:$0 P.M.. Rev. Robert E. Sanders led the meeting in prayer. 

?he Provisional League of Women Voters of Wilmington received permission from the Moderator 
;o bring to this meeting fourteen foreign students to watch our town meeting in action, 
?hey were from the following countries: Netherlands, Australia, India, France, China, 
jermany, Nigeria, Iran, Iraq and Denmark. Mr. Cutter read their names and they stood to be 
••ecognized and were welcomed by the assembly. 

■Ir. Cutter declared that he would dispense with reading each article and refer to them by 
lumber only. There was no objection. 

ARTICLE 2 : To hear the reoorts of Committees and act thereon. 

4r. Erwin Hanke read a minority report for the Permanent Building Committee. 

Phere were no other reports offered at this time. 

VRTICLE 3 t To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Treasurer, with the approval 
)f the Selectmen, to borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the 
"inancial year, beginning January 1, 196ii., and to issue notes therefor payable within one 
rear, all in accordance with Sections I4. and 17, Chapter of the General Laws. On a 

notion by Mr. Charles H. Black the above article was voted unanimously. 

\RTICLE I4 1 To see how much money the Town will appropriate for the expenses of the Town and 
Salaries of the several ^own Offices, and Departments, and determine how the same shall be 
raised, whether by taxation, transfer from available funds, or otherwise, or do anything in 
"elation thereto. 



73 



ARTICLE kt (continued) 

A motion by Mr. Carlo E. Oubellini, Chairman, Finance Committee, - "I move that the several 
and respective sums as recommended by the Finance Committee be raised by taxation and appro- 
priated for the purposes set forth in Article #L|., each item to be taken up and voted on 
separately, subject to amendment." VOTFD, unanimously. 



Accordingly the following amounts were voted: 



C-eneral Government : Taxation 

Eoard of Selectmen 2,600.00 

Election Exoenses 1,000.00 

Registrars of Voters 2,950.00 

Finance Committee 700.00 

Town Manager 17,);03.00 

Industrial Expenses 1,200.00 

Town Accountant 3,867.00 

Town Treasurer 6,368.00 

Town Collector ll,li75.00 

Town Clerk £,014.2. 00 

Board of Assessors 114,883.00 

Town Counsel 3,500.00 

Town Hall 16,712.00 

Planning Board 925.00 

TOTAL - General Government 9U,U25 .00 



Protection: Persons and p roperty 

Police Department Salaries (Tit amendment- to $153, 080 

Yes - 2I4J4. No 
(2nd amendment-to 135,620 

Yes - 320 No 
Main motion as amended 

Yes - 33I4. No < 

Police Department Expenses (Amendment - to ^12,220.00 

Police Station 

Fire Department Salaries 

Fire Department Expenses 

Fire Department Outlays 

Fire Station 

Ambulance Expenses 

Civil Defense 

Constable 

Dog Officer 

Building Inspector 

Board of Appeals 

Sealer of Weights & Measurers 

Tree Warden Department 

Dutch Elm Control 

Gypsy Moth Control 

TOTAL - Protection - Persons and Property 



,00 - 

■ 373 
,00 - 

■ 311 



LOST) 
VOTED) 



■ 261 
- Los 



- VOTED) 



135,620.00 



t by voice vote) 8,14.10.00 
k, 150.00 
117,712.00 
5,91+0.00 

None 
2,960.00 
1,900.00 
None 
100.00 
1,600.00 
10,155.00 
I4.85.OO 
575.00 
11,560.00 

10,300.00 
7,598.00 

319,065.00 



Public Works : 

Town Engineer 1L|.,175.00 

Highway Department Salaries 55,U28.80 

Highway Department Expenses 13,225.00 

Road Machinery Account II4, 150.00 

Chapter 90 Construction 8,500.00 

Chapter 90 Maintenance 1,500.00 

Chapter 8l Maintenance 11,500.00 

Snow and Ice Control 32,914.0.00 

Public Street Lights 17,000.00 

Parks, (Planning Board) 2,800.00 

Cemeteries 3I4., 220.00 



31+,; 

TOTAL - Public Works 205,1430. HO 



Ik 



Health and Sanitation Taxation 
Board of Health 21 ,1^0.00 

Garbage Collection - Amendment to $.13,900.00, Voted 

Finance Committee approved this figure. 

Main Motion as amended - VOTED 13,900.00 
Public Dump - $22,000.00 by standing vote. Yes-288 No-291 - LOST 
Mr. William Stickney moved to reconsider this amount. 
After lengthy discussion the Question was called for. 
To close debate - Yes-56l No-20. Debate closed. 
Reconsideration of the Public Dump amount - $22,000.00, 
VOTED by voice and so declared by the moderator. 
Main Motion - Public Dump - $22,000.00 - VOTED by voice. 

Voice Vote doubted. Standing vote - Yes-500 No-39 22,000.00 
TOTAL - Health and Sanitation 57,3U-0.00 

Charities and Veterans Aid : 

Administration, Public Welfare 7,759.00 

Assistance, Public Welfare 78, 300.00 

TOTAL: Charities «6,059.00 

Veterans Aid and Benefits : 28,662.00 

Schools : 

School Department, Salaries - Amendment voted to reduce by $20,000 l,053»8l8.k.3 

School Department, Expenses - Amendment voted to reduce by $20,000 llj-1, 33l4-.°5 

Operation School Plant 191,296.90 

Vocational Training 6,000.00 

TOTAL: Schools 1, 392,1;50 .lb 

Library and Recreation : 

Public Library 19,918.50 

Recreation Commission 7,14-78.00 

TOTAL: Library and Recreation 27,396.50 

Unclassified and Reserve : 

Reserve Fund 30,000.00 

Permanent Building Committee 1,000.00 

Insurance 33,299.73 

Sewer Maintenance 950.00 

Training, Travel, etc. 1,000.00 

Council for the Aged 250.00 

Town Report 2,000.00 

Tax Title and Legal Assistance 350.00 

Town Clock 60.00 

TOTAL: Unclassified and Reserve 60,909.73 

Maturing Debt and Interest : 

Principal - (Amendment voted to transfer from Water Available 

Surplus the amount of $lj.6,L|.00. 00 and raise by taxa- 
tion $319,175.) 319,175.00 
Interest and fees - (Amendment voted to transfer from Water Available 

Surplus the amount of $10,171.14.0 and raise by taxa- 
tion $117,14.014.. 53) 117,14.014.. 53 
TOTAL: Maturing Debt and Interest 

By Transfer - $56,571.14-0 By Tax 14-36,579.53 

Budget Total 

By Transfer - 56,571.14-0 By Tax - 2,716,325.714- 

GRAND TOTAL $2,772,897,114- 



75 



ARTICLE 5 * To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Permanent Building Committee to 
construct en elementery school on land acquired by the Town off Woburn Street and to see if 
the Town will vote to rsise and appropriate a sum of money for constructing and originally 
equipping and furnishing said elementary school, determine how the appropriation shall be 
raised, whether by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or otherwise, 
end to authorize and instruct the Permanent Building Committee to enter into contracts and 
do all thinp-s thet ere necessary for constructing, equipping and furnishing said elementary 
school, or take any action relative thereto. On request of the Permanent Building Committee 
Finance Committee disapproved. At the present time there is neither a firm land use plan 
nor construction plan and cost estimate to justify Finance Committee approval. Motion by 
Mr. Erwin Hanke, Chairman, Permanent Building Committee - "I move to pass over this article 
and to take no action." Voted by voice. 

ARTICLE 6 ; To see if the Town will determine by vote, as authorized by the provisions of 
Section 6 of Chapter 297 of the Acts of 19£8, what proportion the town will pay of the cost 
of the system of sewerage and sewage disposal, seid cost to be determined on the basis of 
the estimated whole cost to the Town of the complete system of sewerage to serve the Town 
including the whole share of the cost of admission to the North Metropolitan Sewerage Distri< 
and that the remaining cost of said system of sewerage shall be provided for by assessment oi 
the abutters, and by means of any or all of the methods permitted by the General Laws, end 
that provisions cf said G-eneral Laws, relative to the Assessment, apportionment, division, 
re-assessment, ebetement and collection of sewer assessments, to liens therefor, end to 
interest thereon shall apply to assessments made hereunder, or do anything in relation 
thereto. Request of the Board of ^ater and Sewer Commissioners. Finance Committee approved 

Motion by Mr. w P ido A. Stevens, member of the Boerd of v ater Commissioners, "I move that the 
Town vote, as authorized by the provisions of Section 6 of Chapter 297 of the Acts of 1^58, 
to pay a sum equal to between forty and fifty per cent of the cost of the system of sewerage 
and sewage disposal, said cost to be determined on the basis of the estimated whole cost to 
the Town of the complete system of sewerage to serve the Town, including the whole share of 
the cost of admission to the North Metropolitan Sewerage District, and that the remaining 
cost of said system of sewerage shall be provided for by assessment on the abutters, and by 
means of any or all of the methods permitted by the General Laws, relative to the assessment) 
apportionment, division, re-assessment, abatement and collection of sewer assessments, to 
liens therefor, and to interest thereon, shall apply to assessments made hereunder." Vote 
taken by voice. Chair in doubt. Vote taken Sy standing. Yes - 3^4-1 No - 162 Motion 
carried and so declared by the Moderator. 

ARTICLE "J : To see how much money the Town will raise by taxation, or transfer from avail- 
able funds, and appropriate for the purchase of an Accounting Machine for the use of the 
Town, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Temporary Town Manager. Finance 
Committee - insufficient evidence to support this purchase. Motion by Mr. Harold E. Melzar 
to pass over the article and to take no action. Voted by voice. 

ARTICLE 8 ; To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from 
ave liable funds and appropriate for the purchase of a penerator for the use of the Police 
Department, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Temporary Town Manager. 
Finance Committee approved $1,900.00. 

Motion by Mr. Harold E. Melzar, "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appro- 
priate the sum of Nineteen Hundred Dollars ($1,900.00) for the purchase of a generetor for 
the use of the Police Department. Voted by voice, 

ARTICLE 9 ? To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation, or transfer from 
available funds and appropriate for the purchase of two vehicles for the use of the Police 
Department, and authorize the sale or turn-in of two present vehicles used by the Police 
Department, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Temporary Town Manager. 
Finance Committee approved $2,lj.00.00. 

Motion by Mr. Harold E. Melzar, "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appro- 
priate the sum of Twenty-four Hundred Dollars ( $2,lj.00. 00) for the purchase of two vehicles 
for the use of the Police Department and authorize the sale or turn-in of two present 
vehicles used by the Police Department. Voted by voice. 



76 



ARTICLE 10 : To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation, or transfer 
from available funds and appropriate for the purchase of a truck for the use of the Highway 
Department and authorize the sale or turn-in of a truck presently used by the Highway 
Department, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Temporary Town Manager. 
Finance Committee approved maximum, $6,000.00. 

Motion by Mr. Harold E. Melzar, "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appro- 
priate the sum of Six Thousand Dollars (6,000.00) for the purchase of a truck for the use 
of the Highway Department and authorize the sale or turn-in of a truck presently used by the 
Highway Department." 

Amendment by Mr. John Brooks to transfer $6,000.00 from the Hobson Avenue Drainage Account 
for the purpose described above. Amendment voted. Motion as amended - voted. 

ARTICLE 11 ; To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available 
funds a sum of money not to exceed Three Thousand Dollars (53*000.00) and appropriate the 
sum for an additional building to be used for garaging cemetery equipment, or take any action 
in relation thereto. Request of the Cemetery Commissioners. Finance Committee disapproved. 
Current storage space is available. 

Motion by Mr. Francis E. Downs, Cemetery Superintendent - "I move that the Town vote to 
transfer from the Cemetery Sale of Lots Account the sum of $3»000.00 and appropriate the sum 
for an additional building to be for garaging cemetery equipment." Voted by voice and so 
declared by the moderator. 

ARTICLE 12 ; To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available 
funds a sum of money not to exceed Two Thousand Dollars ($2,000.00) and appropriate the sum 
for hot topping avenues in Wildwood Cemetery as far as the money will permit, or take any 
action in relation thereto. Request of the Cemetery Commissioners. Finance Committee 
disapproved; this is desirable but not necessary at the present time. 

Motion by Mr. Francis E. Downs, "I move that the Town vote to raise and appropriate by taxa- 
tion the sum of $2,000.00 to complete the hot topping program of avenues in Wildwood 
Cemetery." 

Amendment by Mr. Larz Neil son to transfer the amount of $1,135.00 from the Cemetery Sale of 
Lots Account and raise by taxation the balance of $865.00 to effect the above article. 
Voted by voice. Main motion as amended - voted. 

ARTICLE 13 t To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available 
funds a sum of money not to exceed Twenty Five Hundred Dollars (2,500.00) and appropriate 
the sum for certain hot topping around the Wildwood, Whitefield and Buzzell Schools, as far 
as the money will permit, or take any action in relation thereto. Request of the Temporary 
Town Manager. Finance Committee disapproved; this is desirable but not necessary at the 
present time. 

Motion by Mr. Harold E. Melzar to pass over the article and take no action. Voted. 

ARTICLE lit. ; To see how much money the Town will raise by taxation, or transfer from avail- 
able funds, and appropriate for the extension of the fire alarm system, or do anything in 
relation thereto. Request of the Temporary Town Manager. Finance Committee approved 
$2,500.00 maximum. 

Motion by Mr. Harold E. Melzar, "I move that the Town vote to transfer from the Boutwell 
Street Account and appropriate the sum of Twenty-five Hundred Dollars ($2,500.00) for the 
extension of the fire alarm system. Voted. 

ARTICLE 15 t To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, or transfer from available 
funds , and appropriate a sura of money for the purpose of paying unpaid bills of previous 
years or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. Finance 
Committee approved $800.00. 



77 



ARTICLE 15 (continued ) 

Motion by Mr. Brooks, "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate, or 
transfer from available funds the sum of $7U0.2L(. for the purpose of paying unpaid bills of 
previous years. The transfer sum to be made up as follows: $689.57 from the Hobson Avenue 
Drainage Account and $50.67 from the Police Building Account. Motion to amend - Voted. 
Main motion as amended, Voted. 

ARTICLE l6 r To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of One Thousand 
Dollars (^"1,000.00) for the observance of Memorial Day and that the Moderator appoint a 
Committee who shall arrange and have charge of such observance, or do anything in relation 
thereto. Finance Committee approved $1,000.00, Upon a moti on by Mrs. Wavie M. Drew it 
was voted to raise and appropriate the sum of $1,000.00 to effect the above article. Voted. 

At this point in the meeting, Mr. Leland E. Campbell moved we adjourn until 7:00 p .M. this 
evening. Voted unanimously. Meeting adjourned at 5*35 P.M. 

The adjourned meeting was called to order at 7:30 P.M. when it was established that a auorutr 
was present. 

ARTICLE 17 : To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of Seven Hundred 
Fifty Dollars ($750.00) for the purpose of renewing under the authority of Section 9 of 
Chapter I4.O of the General Laws as amended, the lease of the American Legion Clubhouse, Inc. 
in Wilmington for the purpose of providing suitable headquarters for the Wilmington Post 
No. 136 of the American Legion, or do anything in relation thereto. Finance Committee 
approved $750.00. 

Mr. Ralph M. Zwicker, Jr., Sr. Vice Commander, moved the adoption of the above article. 
After some discussion a voice vote was taken. The chair was in doubt. A standing vote 
carried. Yes. . . 306 No. . . 112 

ARTICLE 18 ; To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of Seven Hundred 
Fifty Dollars ($750.00) for the purpose of renewing under authority of Section 9 of Chapter 
I4.O of the General Laws as amended, the lease of the Veterans of Foreign Wars Clubhouse on 
v, Main Street for the purpose of providing suitable headouarters for the Nee-Ellsworth Post 

ijj 2I4.58 of the Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States, or do anything in relation 

q thereto. Finance Committee approved $750.00. Mr. Paul A. Farrell, Commander V. F. W. 

j #21+58 moved the adoption of the above article. Voted by voice unanimously. 

ARTICLE 19 : To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money under the 
authority of Section 9 of Chapter L|_0 of the General Laws, as amended, for the purpose of 
providing suitable quarters for the William F. Tattersall Chapter No. 106, Disabled 
American Veterans, located in Wilmington, Massachusetts, or do anything in relation thereto. 
Finance Committee approved $750.00. Mr. Edwin Forrest, Commander, moved the adoption of 
the above article. Voted by voice unanimously. 

ARTICLE 20 : To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of One Hundred 
Dollars (IflOO.OO) the money to be expended under the direction of the l|-H Town Committee, 
serving in cooperation with the Middlesex County Extension Service, under the provisions 
of Sections i+0 to Chapter 128, General Laws of Massachusetts, or do anything in rela- 

»» tion thereto. Finance Committee approved $100.00. Mr. Rene J. LaRivee, Selectman, moved 

the adoption of the above article. Voted by voice unanimously. 

ARTICLE 21 : To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available 
funds and appropriate a sum of money for the purchase of a parcel of land for the construc- 
tion of a pedway to and from the Wildwood School, described as follows: Beginning at the 
intersection of the westerly sideline of Federal Street with the center line of Maple 
Meadow Brook, thence running southerly along a curve in Federal Street a distance of one 
hundred eighty-five (185) feet more or less to land of Williamson; thence turning and run- 
ning by said land of Williamson a distance of one hundred twenty-two and ninety-five 
hundredths (122.95) feet on a bearing of S 88°-30 ' -35"W; thence turning and running on a 
bearing of S 21°-15 '-35"W still by land of Williamson a distance of fifty-one and sixteen 
hundredths (5l. 16) feet, thence still by land of Williamson a distance of one hundred eighty- 
thxae and fifty-nine hundredths (l83.5<^ feet on a bearing of S19°-l;2 , -05" W a distance of 



78 



ARTICLE 21; (continued ) 

one hundred thirty-seven and seventy-nine hundredths (137.79) feet by land of Stevens; 
thence by land of Burns and on a bearing of S 15° -1+1+ '-05"W a distance of seventy find eighty- 
one hundredths (70.81) feet to a point then continuing along the same bearing a distance of 
one hundred eighty- two and zero hundredths (182.00) feet; thence by land of Markey a dis- 
tance of one hundred eighty-seven and thirty-one hundredths (187.31) feet on a bearing of 

' N 75-12' -15 M W; thence on a bearing of S 7li.°-l+6 '-15" w along land of Ingram a distance of 
one hundred eighteen and eleven hundredths (ll8.ll) feet to Wing Hoed; thence by V.ing Road 

1 and along a curve having a radius of forty-five and zero hundredths (1+5.00) ft. a distance 
of one hundred twenty-five and zero hundredths (125.00) feet; thence along lend of Berbas 

: and on a bearing of N 10°-20'-51+" W a distance of one hundred five end zero hundredths 
(105.00) feet; thence on a bearing of N l5 o -57'-03" E and along land of another Earbes e 
distance of two hundred eighteen and zero hundredths (218.00) feet to a stone bound; thence 
by land of the Town of Wilmington and on a bearing of N l6°-36'-28" W a distance of five 

■ hundred twenty-five and thirty-seven hundredths (525.37) feet to another stone bound; thence 

( turning and running still by said land of the Town of Wilmington 8 distance of six hundred 
and zero hundredths (600.00) feet on a bearing of S 79°-37 ' -05"Wto a drill hole in a stone 
well bordering Wildwood Street; thence along said Wildwood Street and on a bearing of N ll+°- 

! 22'-55" W* a distance of forty and nine hundredths (1+0.09 )' feet; thence turning away from 
seid Wildwood Street and going on a bearing of N 79°-37'-05" E a distance of two hundred 
fifty-five and seventy-five hundredths (255.75) feet by land of Ramsdell; thence turning 
and following land of Ramsdell on a bearing of N 09°-l5 ' -?3'V a distance of one hundred 
fifty-four and zero hundredths (151+.00) feet; thence still by land of Ramsdell and on a 
bearing of N l8°-22 '-51+" E a distance of sixty-four and fifty hundredths (61+. 50) feet to an 
old fence post; thence still following said land of Ramsdell, now on a bearing of N 22°— 1+0 1 — 

j 18" W a distance of eighty and zero hundredths (80.00) feet; thence S 72°-07'-59"W a dis- 

1 tance of one hundred fifty-six and thirty-two hundredths (156.32) feet still by seid land 
of Ramsdell; thence again by land of Ramsdell and on a bearing of N 12°-l+l'-08" W a distance 
of one hundred thirty-four and ninety-four hundredths ( 131+ • 9/+ ) feet to an old fence post; 

' thence turning and running along a bearing of Nl+l°-59 ' -35 E a distance of two hundred fifty- 
five (255) feet more or less to the center of Maple Meadow Brook; thence following the center 

< of Maple Meadow Brook by various distances and bearings back to the point of beginning. 
Said area to contain 15.2 acres, or doianything in relation thereto. Request of the Board 
of Selectmen. Finance Committee approved - $l+,500.00 # 

Motion by Mr. Nicholas L. DePelice, Selectman, "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxa- 
i tion and appropriate the sum of $1+, 500. 00 for the purchase of a parcel of land for the 

construction of a pedway to and from the V/ildwood School, described as follows; Beginning 
I at the intersection of the westerly sideline of Federal Street with the center line of 
t Maple Meadow Brook, thence running southerly along a curve in Federal Street a distance of 
t one hundred eighty-five (185) more or less to land of Williamson; thence turning and run- 
ning by said land of Williamson a distance of one hundred twenty-two and ninety-five 
i: hundredths (122.95) feet on a bearing of S 88°-30'-35" W; thence turning and running on e 
: bearing of S 21°-l5'-35" W still by land of Williamson a distance of fifty-one and sixteen 
hundredths (5l.l6) feet, thence still by land of Williamson a distance of one hundred 
eighty-three and fifty-nine hundredths (183.59) feet on a bearing of S 19°-l+2»-05" W, thence 
1 on a bearing of S l5°-2l+'-05" W a distance of one hundred thirty-seven 8nd seventy-nine 
1 hundredths (137.79) feet by land of Stevens; thence by land of Burns and on a bearing of 
S 15°-1+1+ ' -05" W a distance of seventy and eighty-one hundredths (70.8l) feet, thence by 
other land of Barbas and on a bearing of N 55°-17'-05" W a distance of four hundred 
thirteen and ten hundredths (1+13.10) feet to a stone bound, thence by land of the Town of 
• Wilmington and on a bearing of N l6°-36'-28" W a distance of five hundred twenty- five and 
thirty-seven hundredths (525.37) feet to another stone bound; thence turning and running 
still by said land of the Town of Wilmington a distance of six hundred and zero hundredths 
(600.00) feet on a bearing of S 79°-37 l -05" W to a drill hole in a stone wall bordering 
Wildwood Street; thence along said Wildwood Street and on a bearing of N l!+°-22'-55" W a 
distance of forty and nine hundredths (1+0.09) feet; thence turning away from said Wildwood 
Street and going on a bearing of N 79°-37»-05" E a distance of two hundred fifty-five and 
seventy-five hundredths (255.75) feet Q by land of Ramsdell; thence turning and following 
j land of Ramsdell on a bearing of N 09 -15' -23" W a distance of one hundred fifty-four and 
zero hundredths (151+.00) feet; thence still by land of Ramsdell and on a bearing of 



79 



ARTICLE 21: (continued ) 

N10 o -22'-51;" E 8 distance of sixty-four and fifty hundredths ( 6i+. ^0 ) feet to an old fence 
post; thence still following said land of Ramsdell, now on a bearing of N 22°-l|0 ' -18" W a 
distance of eighty and zero hundredths (80.00 feet; thence S 72°-07 , -59" W a distance of 
one hundred fifty-six and thirty- two hundredths (156.32) feet still by said land of Ramsdell 
thence again by land of Ramsdell and on a bearing of N 12°-^l*-08" W a distance of one 
hundred thirty-four and ninety-four hundredths (I3I4..9I1) feet to an old fence post; thence 
turning and running along a bearing of N lj.l°-59 1 -35" E a distance of two hundred fifty-five 
(255) feet more or less to the center of Maple Meadow Brook; thence following the center of 
Maple Meadow Brook by various distances and bearings back to the point of beginning. Said 
area to contain 12.76 acres." Motion voted by voice unanimously, and so declared by the 
Moderator. 

ARTICLE 22 ; To see if the Town will raise by taxation or transfer from available funds, 
and appropriate a sum of money for the construction of 8 pedway to and from the Wildwood 
School on the parcel of land as described in the preceding article, or do anything in rela- 
tion thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. Finance Committee approved $7,000.00 
maximum based on Town Engineer estimates. 

Motion by Mr. Charles H. Black, Selectman, "I move that the Town vote to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $7,000.00 for the construction of a pedway to and from the Wildwood 
School on the parcel of land as described in the preceding Article." Voted by voice and so 
declared by the Moderator. 

ARTICLE 23 ; To see if the Town will vote to accept and construct the relocation of a por- 
tion of Boutwell Street as a public town way as laid out by the Board of Selectmen and 
submitted to the Planning Board according to a plan filed with the office of the Town Clerk 
and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to take by Right of Eminent Domain such land, slope 
and drainage and other easements as may be necessary to effect the purpose of the Article 
and to see how much money the Town will appropriate for said purpose and determine how such 
appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation, by transfer from available funds in the 
treasury, or otherwise, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of Selectmen. Finance 
Committee disapproved. Not of imperative need. Upon a motion by Mr. John Brooks it was 
voted to pass over the article and take no action on it. 

ARTICLE 2k. : To see if the Town will vote to accept Drury Lane from School Street to Glen 
Road, Loumac Road from Drury Lane to the end, and School Street from the Buzzell School to 
the dead end, as public ways, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of Edna E. 
Berger and others. Finance Committee approved. 

Motion by Mrs. Wavie M. Drew, "I move that the Town vote to accept Drury Lane from School 
Street to Glen Road, loumac Road from Drury Lane to the end, and School Street from the 
Buzzell School to the dead end, as public ways." Voted. 

ARTICLE 25 t To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way the layout of Cedar 
Crest Road as approved by the Planning Board and made by the Selectmen under the provisions 
of law relating to the Assessment of Betterments, which layout is filed in the office of the 
Town Clerk, and which, with plans therein mentioned is hereby referred to for more particu- 
lar description; and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to take by the right of Eminent 
Domain such land, slope and drainage or other easements as may be necessary to effect the 
purpose of this article, and to determine how an appropriation shall be raised, whether by 
taxation or by transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise, for the purpose 
of constructing said way and for the payment of any damages resulting from the taking of 
land and slope and easements and other easements therefor, or do anything in relation 
thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. Finance Committee - approved $23,000.00 Bond 
Issue. 

Mr. Nicholas De Felice moved the adoption of the article as laid out above and to effect the 
purpose of this article that the Town Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen is 
authorized to borrow the sum of $23,000.00 and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor 
payable within five years as stated In the above article, for which this money is raised. 



80 



ARTICLE 25: (continued ) 

After a lengthy di scussion a standing vote was taken. Yes. . . 227 No. . .128 
The meeting called for a recount also taken by a standing vote. 

Yes. . .271 No. . .139 

A two-third vote was needed. Motion lost. 

ARTICLE 26 : To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way the layout of Reading 
Avenue as approved by the Planning Board and made by the Selectmen under the provisions of 
the law relating to the assessment of Betterments, which layout is filed in the office of 
the Town Clerk, and which, with plans therein mentioned is hereby referred to for more 
particular description; and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to take by the Right of 
Eminent Domain such land, slope and drainage or other easements as may be necessary to 
effect the purpose of this article, and to determine how an appropriation shall be raised, 
whether by taxation or by transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise, for 
the purpose of constructing said way and for the payment of any damages resulting from the 
taking of land and slope easements therefor, or do anything in relation thereto. Request 
of the Board of Selectmen. Finance Committee, No action, petitioners to withdraw article. 
Motion by Mr. Rene J. LaRivee, "I move that the article be passed." Voted. 

ARTICLE 27 ? To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law and Map, particularly 
a zoning amendment voted at a Town Meeting July 1, 1959, (Article by striking out the 
description of the parcel there set forth, and substituting the following description; that 
parcel of land bounded by Main Street, Shawsheen Avenue, Boston and Maine Railroad and 
Bridge Lane, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Building Inspector and 
Town Clerk. Finance Committee approve Planning Board Action. Motion by Mr. Minot Anderson, 
Building Inspector, to pass over the article and take no action on it. Voted. 

ARTICLE 28 : To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-law and Map, particularly 
a zoning amendment (Article voted March 12, I960 by striking out the description of the 

parcel of land set forth therein, and substituting the following description; that parcel 
of lend on the easterly side of Main Street, starting I4.OO feet northerly from Clark Street 
and extending northerly 1650 1 along Main Street, depth varying from i^OO' to 1300' and com- 
prising entirely and exclusively a parcel shown as en Industrial District on the official 
Zoning Map adopted November 28, 1955, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the 
Building Inspector and Town Clerk. Finance Committee approve Planning Board Action. Upon 
a motion by Mr. Minot Anderson, it was voted to Dass over the article and take no ection on 
it. 

ARTICLE 29 : To see if the Town will vote to extend the present Neighborhood Business Zone 
located on the South Side of Lowell Street and the east side of Woburn Street, Wilmington, 
Massachusetts as follows: Starting at the southeasterly point of the existing Neighborhood 
Business Zone on Lowell Street and following southeasterly along Lowell Street for three 
hundred feet (300') and turning 90° south and running four hundred feet (I4.OO') and turning 
90 west and running parallel to Lowell Street to a point of intersection wi th Woburn 
Street and then turning north to a point of intersection on Woburn Street with the existing 
Neighborhood Business Zone, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of John A. Lucci, 
Jr. and others. Finance Committee approve Planning Board Action. Planning Board Report 
filed with the Town Clerk. The Planning Board does not recommend this extension. 

John A. Lucci, Jr. moved the adoption of the above article. A lengthy discussion follows. 
Motion to close debate voted unanimously. The vote on the main motion was taken by 
standing. Yes. . .[(.62 No. . .71 Motion adopted. 

ARTICLE 30 : To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law and Map by extending 
the present General Business Area to include the following parcel of land: Beginning at 
the corner of Lowell and West Streets westerly along the northerly side of Lowell Street 
I4.8O feet, thence northerly parallel to 'West Street 1+50 feet, thence easterly parallel to 
Lowell Street 1+50 feet, thence southerly along West Street to the point of beginning or do 
anything in relation thereto. Request of Olge Ella and others. Finance Committee approve 
Planning Board action. Planning Board Report filed with the Town Clerk. The Planning 
Board recommends no change of Zoning on this piece of land at the present time. 



81 



ART [CLE 30 ; (Continued) 

Mr. John Elia moved the adoption of the above article. A lengthy discussion follows. 
Motion to close debate taken by standing. Yes. . .178 No. . . 2l|.0 Lost. The discussion 
continued. 

Mr. Elia moved to amend his motion by striking out the words General Business and replacing 
the words Neighborhood Business. Voted. Discussion on motion as amended follows. Motion 
to close debate voted by standing. Yes. . ,5l8 No. . .2 Debate closed. The moderator 
stated the motion as amended and called for a standing vote. Yes. . .1^12 No. . .138 
Moti on carried. 

ARTICLE 2,1 : To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law and Map by changing 
from Single Residence "A" District to Industrial District the following described parcel of 
land: Beginning at a point on Middlesex Avenue one hundred fifty (150') feet north of a 
stone bound at the north side of First Avenue, the line runs easterly seven hundred-six and 
71/100 (706.71*) feet parallel with First Avenue to the line of the Boston & Maine Railroad; 
thence southeasterly by said Boston & Maine Railroad two thousand seven hundred fifty-four 
and 79/100 (275V 79') feet to an iron pipe bound at Concord Street; thence northwesterly by 
said Concord Street one thousand six hundred eighty-five ^1685') feet more or less to a 
ditch at land now or formerly of Prank and Marjory Stevens; thence northeasterly by said 
ditch and by said Stevens' land two hundred sixty-eight (268') feet more or less to a 
corner at land now or formerly of Paul and Doris Reitchel, Jr., and by land now or formerly 
of Ernest V.'. and Rose M. Eames; thence easterly by said ditch and by land of said Reitchels 1 
one hundred ninety-two (192.0) feet more or less to a corner at land of said Eames and at 
land now or formerly of Christina Lopez; thence northerly by another ditch by land of said 
Lopez two hundred fourteen 5/100 (21V5') feet more or less to a stake at the upland; thence 
northwesterly by land of said Lopez five hundred eighty-four and 9/100 (58V9') feet more 
or less to a corner; thence northwesterly by land of said Lopez one hundred sixty-five 
(165') feet more or less to a stake and stones; thence northeasterly by said Lopez land and 
by a line on the easterly side of Mystic Avenue six hundred thirty-seven and $\±/\00 (637. 5W 
feet more or less to the northerly side of First Avenue; thence westerly by said First 
Avenue four hundred sixty-four and 76/100 (I4.6I+. 76 1 ) feet more or less to a stone bound at 

y Middlesex Avenue; thence northerly on a line of said Middlesex Avenue one hundred fifty 

(150') feet to the point of beginning, or do anything in relation thereto. Reouest of 

.0 James A. Mackey and others. Finance Committee approve Planning Board action. 

'.j 

Motion by Mr. James A. Mackey: "I move that the Town vote to amend the Zoning By-Law Map 
5 by changing from Single Residence "A" District to Industrial District the following des- 

cribed parcel of Land: Beginning at a point on Middlesex Avenue one hundred fifty (150') 
feet north of a stone bound at the north side of First Avenue the line runs easterly seven 
hundred-six and 7l/l00 (706.71') feet parallel with First Avenue to the line of the Boston 
' & Main Railroad; thence southeasterly by said Boston & Maine Railroad two thousand six 

hundred fourteen (261V ) feet more or less to a point on a line one hundred (100') feet 
north and parallel with Concord Street; thence northwesterly by said line parallel with and 
one hundred (100') feet north of said Concord Street one thousand five hundred eighty-five 
■ (1585') feet more or less to a ditch at land now or formerly of Frank and Marjory Stevens; 

J thence northeasterly by said ditch and by said Stevens' land one hundred sixty-eight (168' 

; feet more or less to a corner at land now or formerly of Paul and Doris Reitchel, Jr., and 

by land now or formerly of Ernest W. and Rose M. Eames; thence easterly by said ditch and 
by land of said Reitchels' one hundred ninety-two (192 1 ) feet more or less to a corner at 
land of said Eames and at land now or formerly of Christina Lopez; thence northerly by 
another ditch by land of said Lopez two hundred fourteen and 5/100 (21V5 1 ) feet more or 
less to a stake at the upland; thence northwesterly by land of said Lopez five hundred 
eighty-four and 9/100 (5814.. 9') feet more or less to a corner; thence northwesterly by land 
of said Lopez sixty-five (65') feet more or less; thence northeasterly by a line parallel 
with Mystic Avenue seven hundred thirty-seven and 5Vl00 (737.5V) feet more or less; 
thence westerly five hundred sixty-four and 76/100 (56V 76') feet more or less to a point 
at Middlesex Avenue ; thence northerly on a line of said Middlesex Avenue (50') feet to the 
point of beginning." Planning Board Report filed with the Town Clerk. If buffer zone pro- 
tection should be provided of 100 feet along First Street, Mystic Avenue and Concord Street 
the Planning Board would recommend favorable action. 



82 



ARTICLE 31; (continued ) 

The moderator permitted Mr. Cosmo Caterino to apeak on motion. Mr. Caterino disolayed a 
map which showed more buffer zone protection. After a great deal of debate a motion to 
close debate was voted unanimously. The vote on the main motion was taken by standing 
Yes. . .259 No. . .193 Motion lost. 

At this point in the meeting a motion to reconsider Article #30 was lost by a voice vote. 

ARTICLE 32 ; To gee if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law changing from Single 
Residence A to Industrial, the following described parcel of land; Starting at a point on 
Kilmarnock Street, Wilmington, and running south 8° 02' 0?" E nine hundred seventy-eight 
and 22/100 (978.22) feet to an iron post; thence turning and running north 32° I4.8' 2I4." west 
eleven hundred fifty-four and 56/100 (115U.56) feet to an iron post and Kilmarnock Street, 
and thence running along Kilmarnock Street north 8J_|_° 22' E one hundred seventy-six and 
90/100 (176.90) feet to an iron post, thence continuing along Kilmarnock Street north 
87 ij.1' E one hundred thirty-nine and 6/100 (139.06) feet, thence continuing along 
Kilmarnock Street south 8l° 52' 56" E one hundred twenty- four and l+O/lOO (121+. 1+0) feet to 
an iron post, thence continuing along Kilmarnock Street south 8l° 52' 56" E fifty-one and 
17/100 (51.17) feet to point of beginning. Said plot of land is shown in a plan of land 
filed with the Town Clerk on January 17, 1963 and known as "Land In Wilmington, Massachu- 
setts, December 1962" and drawn by Gordon E, Ainsworth, Registered Surveyor, or do anything 
in relation thereto. Request of Edith E. Cutter and others. Finance Committee approve 
Planning Board action. (Mr. DePelice took the chair.) 

Mr. Simon Cutter moved the adoption of the above article noting in motion that said lot is 
also described by being bounded by Interstate Highway Route #93* the Boston ft Maine Rail- 
road, and Kilmarnock Street. Planning Board Report filed with the Town Clerk. The 
Planning Board disapproves this change to Industrial use. After a great deal of debate, a 
motion to close debate was voted unanimously. Vote on main motion was taken by standing. 
Yes. . .191+ No. . .105 Motion Lost. 

Mr. Cutter moved to reconsider Article 32. More debate follows. A vote to close arguments 
was taken by standing. Yes. . .278 No. . .35 Debate closed. Vote on motion to recon- 
sider Article #32 taken by a standing vote. Yes. . .210 No. . .158 Motion Lost. 

ARTICLE 33 ; To see if the Town will vote to re zone from "Rural" to Single Residence "A" a 
strip of land 200 feet deep on each side of Chestnut Street from the present Single Resi- 
dence A District to the boundary line of the City of Woburn, Massachusetts, or do anything 
in relation thereto. Reauest of William P. Roberts and others. Finance Committee approve 
Planning Board action. 

Motion by Mr. Roland I. Wood; "I move that the Town vote to amend the Zoning By-Laws and 
map by changing from "Rural" to "Single Residence A, a strip of land 200 feet deep on each 
side of Chestnut Street, starting at a point where present "Single Residence A District" 
ends and extending to the end of Chestnut Street to the Boundary line of the City of Woburn." 
Planning Board Report filed with the Town Clerk. The Planning 3oard disapproves this 
article . 

Because the hour was one minute of midnight and further action would take the meeting into 
Sunday, a motion was made to recess to Monday night at 8:00 o'clock in the evening in the 
Barrows Auditorium. Mr. Fitzmaurice asked that Article #32 be reconsidered then. Voted 
Meeting adjourned at 12:00 midnight. 

Voters checked in at the afternoon meeting - 891 
Voters checked in at the evening meeting - 701+ 



83 



The Adjourned Annual Town Meeting reconvened at the Barrows Auditorium in the High School 
on March 11, 1963 at 3:15 P.M. Quorum then being present. 

ARTICLE 33 * Mr. Roland I. Wood read his motion again as noted above. Mr. Carl Backman 
asked that the p lanning Board Report be read again. This was done. A lengthy discussion 
follows. A motion to close debate was taken by standing. Yes. . .31+5 No. . .15 
Debate was closed. The vote on the main motion was taken by standing. Yes. . .2I4. 
No. . .275 Motion Lost. 

Mr. Cutter appointed Mr. Nicholas L. DeFelice to take the chair so that he could talk on his 
article #32. 

ARTICLE 32: (Reconsidered ) 

Mr. limon Cutter read this motion again (refer to previous minutes of Article 32). 

Mr. Evans, Planning Board, Chairman said he hoped the meeting would not spot zone this area, 

Mr. Anderson, Building Inspector, asked where in the zoning laws does it mention spot zoning 
Mr. ^vans said there is none, but this is his idea of spot zoning. After a great deal more 
argument ensued, a motion to close debate was voted as follows: Yes. . .345 No. . .2 
Debate was closed. Vote on the main motion was taken by standing Yes. . .175 No. . .1^2 
Motion Lost. 

ARTICLE 3h ' To see if the Town will authorize the Board of Selectmen to purchase or take by 
Eminent Domain the strip of land ten feet in width adjoining the westerly sideline of 
Ballardvale Street from the northerly lire of the Cowie property to the intersection of 
Ballardva] e Street and Route 125 as described in the map approved by the Planning Board and 
on file with the Town Clerk for the Durpose of constructing a sidewalk; and further to see 
if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of acquiring 
said land or do anything in relation thereto. Reauest of the Board of Selectmen. Finance 
Committee - desirable but not necessary this year. 

Motion by Mr. John Brooks: "I move that the Town authorize the Board of Selectmen to pur- 
chase or take by Eminent Domain the strip of land ten feet in width adjoining the westerly 
sideline of Ballardvale Street from the northerly line of the Cowie property and Route 125 
as described in the map approved by the Planning Board and on file with the Town Clerk for 
the purpose of constructing a sidewalk, and further that the Town raise and appropriate the 
sum of |[|.,000.00 for the purpose of acqu iring said land." 

Motion to amend by Mr. John Brooks: "I move that the motfan be amended to read that the town 
authorize the Selectmen to purchase or take by Eminent Domain a strip of land 10 feet wide 
from the northerly line of the Cowie property a distance of lfiO feet, more or less, but no 
further than the nearest side of the so-called Eaton driveway, and further, that the town 
raise and appropriate the sum of $1,800.00 for said purpose." Amendment voted by voice. 
Motion as amended taken by a standing vote. Yes. . .263 No. . .9 Motion carried. 

Motion to adjourn was voted. Meeting was dissolved and so declared by the moderator. 
Time of adjournment 10:30 P.M. 

There were four hundred forty-two (lUj-2) voters checked on the voting list. 



Total Voted as follows: 



By Taxation 
By Transfer 
Grand Total 



$2,738,1^0.71). 



69,914-6.61+ 
$2,b08;087.38 



A true copy: 
Attest: 



(Mrs.) Esther L. Russell 
Town Clerk 



8U 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING- - May 27, 1963 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 



TO: Either of the Constables of the Town of Wilmington: 

GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and in the manner prescribed 
in the By-Laws of said Town, you are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of 
the Town qualified to vote in Town affairs to meet and assemble at the Herbert C. Barrows 
Auditorium on Monday, the Twenty- seventh Day o^ May next at 8:00 P.M., to consider and act 
on the following Articles - 

At this point in the reading of the Warrant, Mr. Charles H. Black moved to dispense with 
further reading of the warrant and this motion was voted and so adopted. 

Mr. Black asked permission to speak; this was granted. He introduced our new Town Manager, 
Mr. Gerald R. Bouchard to the town meeting. Mr. Bouchard said it was a pleasure to be here 
and he pledged his best services to the town. 

The Moderator stated that he would not read each article but only refe 1 " to it by number if 
there were no objections. None were offered, therefor this policy was adopted. 

ARTICLE 1 : To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law and Map, particularly a 
zoning amendment voted at a Town Meeting July 1, 1959, Article [(., by striking out the des- 
cription of the parcel there set forth, and substituting the following description; that 
parcel of land bounded by Main Street, Shawsheen Avenue, Boston and Maine Railroad and 
Bridge Lane, or do anything in relation thereto. Reru est of the Building Inspector and 
Town Clerk. 

Mr. Minot J. Anderson, Building Inspector moved the adoption of the above article. Finance 
Committee approved Article #1. The Planning Board approved the above article, noting that 
it would be in the best interest of the Town. The Moderator called for a voice vote. 
Voted unanimously. 

ARTICLE -2 : To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law and Map, particularly 
a zoning amendment, Article l\l\. t voted March 12, I960 by striking out the description of the 
parcel of land set forth therein, and substituting the following description; that parcel 
of land on the easterly side of Main Street, starting ij.00 feet northerly from Clark Street 
and extending northerly 1650 ' along Main Street, depth varying from I4.OO 1 to 1300' and com- 
prising entirely and exclusively a parcel shown as an Industrial District on the official 
Zoning Map adopted November 28, 1955, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the 
Building Inspector and Town Clerk. 

Mr. Minot J. Anderson moved the adoption of the above article. Finance Committee approved 
Article #2. The Planning 3oard approved the above article noting that it would be in the 
best interest of the town. The Moderator called for a voice vote. Voted unanimously. 

ARTICLE 3 * To see if the Town will vote to amend the vote adopted under Article 1 of the 
Warrant for the Special Town Meeting held January 21, 1963, by changing the description of 
the land which the Selectmen are authorized to purchase or take by Eminent Domain for the 
purpose of erecting a school thereon on Woburn Street, said vote in all other respects, 
including the appropriation made thereunder, to be ratified and confirmed, and said amended 
description to read as follows: Beginning at a stone bound on the westerly sideline of 
Woburn Street, thence running on a bearing of N 21°26'20"Ea distance of two hundred seventeen 
and sixty- two hundredths (217.62) feet to another stone bound still on the westerly sideline 
I of Woburn Street. Thence continuing along said sideline and now by a stone wall eighteen 
and seven hundredths (18.07) feet along a bearing of u Il4.°-5l4.' -30" E; thence turning and 
running still by said stone wall one hundred fourteen and forty- two hundredths (lllj..l|.2) 
feet on a bearing of N 06 o -29'-00" E; thence on a bearing of N 00°-00'-00" E still along 
stone wall a distance of forty-one and twenty- two hundredths ([(.1.22) feet; thence still 
following said stone wall eighty-eight and seventy-seven hundredths (88.77) feet along a 
bearing of N 02°-59 ' -lj.6" W; thence to an intersection of stone walls a distance of eighty 
and ninety-eight hundredths (80.98) feet along a N 05°-32'-00" W bearing. Thence turnine 



85 



ARTICLE 3 ; (continued) 

and running along said intersecting wall and on a bearing of N 89°lj.l ' ijij." W a distance of 
thirty-three and eighty-seven hundredths (33«87) feet; thence across a discontinuance in 
the wall a distance of thirty-eight and twenty-five hundredths (38.25) feet on a bearing of 
N 88°-^3'-36" W; thence on a bearing of N 87°-33 L 52" W and again by said stone wall, one 
hundred three and eighty-one hundredths (103. 8l ) feet; thence two hundred one and forty-nine 
hundredths (201.Ij.9) feet on a bearing of N 87°_o8'-58" w to another intersection of stone 
walls; thence continuing along said stone wall and now on a bearing of N 8J4. 3^ t —16" W a dis- 
tance of one hundred twelve and fourteen hundredths (112. lij.) feet; thence on a bearing of 
N 88°_^[).« -03" W a distance of one hundred twenty-six and sixteen hundredths (126.16) feet 
to still another intersection of stone walls. Now turning and running S 01°-i7«-07" E a 
distance of one hundred eighty-eight and fifty-nine hundredths (188.59) feet along said 
intersecting stone wall; thence continuing along said stone wall but on a bearing of 
S 03 -25'-l)-7" E a distance of one hundred twenty-five and seventy-one hundredths (125.71) 
feet to yet another stone wall intersection; now continuing along said stone wall a dis- 
tance of five hundred eighty-nine and ninety-three hundredths (589.93) feet to still one 
more intersection of stone walls on a bearing of S 02°-3i|. 1 -32" E; thence turning and run- 
ning N 85°-llj. ' -10" E a distance of four hundred seventy-one and twenty-eight hundredths 
(lj.71.28) feet back to the westerly sideline of Woburn Street; now turning and running by 
said westerly sideline of Woburn Street end on a bearing of N 01°-56 ' -12" W a distance of 
two hundred thirty-one and sixty- two hundredths (231.62) feet to an angle point; thence 
still by the westerly sideline of Woburn Street but now on a bearing of N 21 o -26'-20" E 
a distance of eighty-one and seventy-one hundredths (87. 71) feet back to the point of be- 
ginning. Said area to contain about ten (10) acres, or do anything in relation thereto. 
Request of the Board of Selectmen. 

Mr. Nicholas L. DeFelice moved the adoption of the above article. Finance Committee 
approved Article #3. A printing error was discovered in the last sentence of the descrip- 
tion of the land. A motion was made to amend the description by striking out (87.71) and 
substituting (8l.8l). The amendment was voted unanimously. A lengthy discussion follows. 
A motion was introduced to close discussion and was voted by voice unanimously. The vote 
on the main motion as amended was as follows: Yes. . .Lj.73 No. . .5 Motion carried. 

After article 3 was completed, Mr. Charles Black moved that article #10 be taken up at this 
time. Voted unanimously. 

ARTICLE 10 ; To see if the Town will accept as a gift for use as a pedway to the new school 
proposed for construction off Woburn Street, a certain parcel of land shown on a plan en- 
titled "Jim. DeCarolis, Marcia Road, Wilmington, Mass., scale 1" - I4.O ' , dated April l5» 
1963» bounded and described as follows: A strip or parcel of land fifty (50) feet wide ad- 
joining Lot 25 on said plan running a distance of one hundred eighty-five and 59/100 
(185.59) feet in a direction away from Marcia Road along a stone wall to a point on said 
stone wall as shown on said plan; thence at a right angle along another stone wall a dis- 
tance of fifty (50) feet, more or less, to a point on the nearest boundary on Lot 25; thence 
in a direction toward Marcia Road to a point along said boundary line of Lot 25 to the be- 
ginning of a curved line; thence along ssid curved line at a radius of twenty-five (25) 
feet to a point on the boundary line of Lot 25 along Marcia Road Extension; thence running 
along said Marcia Road Extension in the direction of the ?tone wall first mentioned to the 
point of beginning, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen, 

Mr. John Brooks moved the adoption of the above article. Finance Committee approved. 
After some discussion on the motion it was moved to close debate. Voted by voice, unani- 
mously. Action on the main motion was taken by voice. Voted unanimously and so declared 
by the moderator. 

After Article 10 was completed, Mr. Harold McKelvey moved that Article #6 be taken up at 
this time. The vote was taken by voice and lost, and so declared by the Moderator. 



86 



ARTICLE 1+ : To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen or Town Manager, in 
consideration of the settlement by the Commonwealth of the Town's claim for damages for the 
taking of about four acres of land belonging to the Town near the Reading line for the con- 
struction of Route #93* in the sum of five hundred dollars, to execute an agreement on be- 
half of the Town indemnifying the Commonwealth against any claim by anyone other than the 
Town on account of such taking, details and wording of such agreement to be at the discretia 
of the officers executing the same, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the 
Board of Selectmen. Mr. Charles H. Black moved the adoption of the above article. Finance 
Committee approved acceptance of $500.00. Motion was voted unanimously. 

ARTICLE $ : To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of money by taxa- 
tion, by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or otherwise for the purpose of con- 
structing and originally equipping and furnishing an elementary school on land acquired by 
the Town off Woburn Street, and to authorize and instruct the Permanent Building Committee 
to enter into contracts and to do all things that are necessary for constructing and 
originally equipping and furnishing said elementary school, or take any action relative 
thereto. Request of the Permanent Building Committee. 

Motion by Mr. Robert B. Michelson, Chairman, Permanent Building Committee: "I move that 
the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $597*000.00 to construct and originally 
equip and furnish an elementary school on land owned, acquired, or to be acquired, by the 
Town, off Woburn Street, in North Wilmington and to meet said appropriation that the 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, be and is hereby authorized to borrow a sum 
or sums not to exceed $597*000.00 under the authority of Chapter 61+5* Acts of 192+8 as 
amended and to issue bonds or notes therefore, payable in not more than 20 years and that 
the Permanent Building Committee be and hereby is authorized to enter into contracts and to 
do all things that are necessary for constructing, originally equipping and furnishing said 

i elementary school. Finance Committee approved $597*000.00 - Bond Issue. Mr. Harold S. 

| Shea, Superintendent of Schools spoke on school needs. 

Amendment offered by Mr. Paul H. Niles, also signed by Mr. Erwin Hanke : "I move to amend 
the motion by substituting the following therefor: that the Town authorize and instruct 
the Permanent Building Committee to construct, originally equip and furnish a 15 classroom 
elementary school on land acquired by the Town off Woburn Street and to authorize the 
Permanent Building Committee to enter into all contracts necessary to do same and further 
to instruct the Permanent Building Committee to utilize Town-owned plans for the construc- 
tion of 12 of the classrooms of said elementary school and to design and construct three 
additional classrooms to be connected thereto; the total amount to be expended for all work 
may not exceed the sum of $511*525* said sum to be raised and appropriated by borrowing a 
sum or sums not to exceed $511*525 under Chapter 61+5, Acts of 19U8 and to be paid by notes 
of the town payable in 20 years." 

A lengthy discussion follows. A motion to close debate on the amendment was voted as 
follows: Yes. . .1+79 No. . .1+3 Motion carried. 

The moderator called for a vote on the motion to amend. Motion was lost by a voice vote 
and so declared by the moderator. The vote on the main motion was taken by a standing vote 
as follows: Yes. . .370 No. . .96 Motion carried. 

ARTICLE 6 : To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-law and Map by changing 
from Single Residence A District to Industrial District the following described parcel of 
land: Beginning at a point on Middlesex Avenue one hundred fifty (150') feet north of a 
stone bound at the north side of First Avenue the line runs easterly seven hundred six and 
71/100 (706. 71') feet parallel with First Avenue to the line of the Boston & Maine Railroad 
thence southeasterly by said Boston & MaineRa ilroad two thousand six hundred fourteen 
(2611+' ) feet more or less to a point on a line one hundred (100' ) feet north and parallel 
with Concord Street; thence northwesterly by said line parallel with and one hundred (100') 
feet north of said Concord Street one thousand five hundred eighty-five (1585 1 ) feet more 
or less to a ditch at land now or formerly of Frank and Marjory Stevens; thence north- 
easterly by said ditch and by said Stevens' land one hundred sixty-eight (168') feet more 
or less to a corner at land now or formerly of Paul and Doris Reitchel, Jr., and by land 
now or formerly of Ernest W. and Rose M. Eames; thence easterly by said ditch and by land 
of said Reitchels' one hundred ninety -two (192*) feet more or less to a corner at land of 



87 



ARTICLE 6 ; (continued) 

said Barnes and at land now or formerly of Christina Lopez; thence northerly by another 
ditch by land of said Lopez two hundred fourteen and 5/100 (211).. 05' ) feet more or less to 
a stake at the upland; thence northwesterly by land of seid Lopez five hundred eighty-four 
and 9/100 ( ^81+ . 09 ' ) feet more or less to a corner; thence northwesterly by land of said 
Lopez sixty-five (65* ) feet more or less; thence northeasterly by a line parallel with 
Mystic Avenue seven hundred thirty-seven and 5^1-/100 (737»5Jj-') feet more or less; thence 
westerly five hundred sixty-four and 76/IOO (5olj..76') feet more or less to a point at 
Middlesex Avenue; thence northerly on a line of said Middlesex Avenue fifty (50* ) feet to 
the point of beginning, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of James A. Mackey and 
others. Mr. James A. Mackey moved the adoption of the above article. Finance Committee 
approved. 

Planning Board Report (in part): "It is our opinion that the highest and best use of this 
land is industrial, and we therefore recommend favorable action on this article. " 

Mr. Costello was allowed to speak on the article. Mr. George G. Lingenf elter, Jr. rose to 
a point of order. He said he wanted to go on record as calling this motion illegal. Mr. 
Philip B. Buzzell, Town Counsel, was asked for an opinion. He said he agrees with the 
Moderator that it is a legal article. Upon a motion to close discussion, the vote was 
taken by voice and was voted, and so declared by the Moderator. 

Mr. Mackey, maker of the motion, asked that Selectman Brooks be allowed to use his time. 
This was granted. Mr. Brooks spoke as a Taxpayer and a Selectmen; in favor. The Moderator 
called for a vote on the main motion. Vote as follows: Yes. . .330 No. . .171 Motion 
was lost, and so declared by the Moderator. 

ARTICLE J : To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way the layout of Cedar 
Crest Road as approved by the Planning Board and made by the Selectmen under the provisions 
of law relating to the assessment of Betterments, which layout is filed in the office of 
the Town Clerk, and which, with plans therein mentioned is hereby referred to for more 
^ particular description; and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to take by right of Eminent 

Domain such land, slope and drainage or other easements as may be necessary to effect the 
purpose of the Article, and to determine how an appropriation shall be raised, whether by 
taxation or by transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise, for the purpose 
of constructing said way and for the payment of any damages resulting from the taking of 
land and slope easements and other easements therefor, or do anything in relation thereto. 
Request of the Board of Selectmen. 

Motion by Mr. James R. Miceli: "I move that the Town accept as a public way the layout of 
\ Cedar Crest Road as approved by the Planning Board and made by the Selectmen under the pro- 

visions of law relating to the Assessment of Betterments, which layout is filed in the 
office of the Town Clerk, and which, with plans therein mentioned is hereby referred to for 
more particular description; and that the Selectmen be and they are hereby authorized to 
take by right of Eminent Domain such land, slope and drainage or other easements as may be 
necessary to effect such purpose, and for the purpose of constructing said way and for the 
payment of any damages resulting from said takings, there is hereby appropriated the sum 
% of $25*000.00. Said amount to be raised by a bond issue. Finance Committee approved. 

After a lengthy debate, a motion was made to close arguments. Motion voted unanimously. 
Mr. Miceli was allowed to speak again, since this was his motion. The vote on the main 
motion was taken by a standing vote, as follows: Yes. . .215 No. 28 Motion carried. 

ARTICLE 8 : To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the 
purpose of laying a water main in Main Street of not less than six inches, but less than 
sixteen inches in diameter, in accordance with the recommendations of the Board of Water 
and Sewer Commissioners acting under the provisions of General Laws (Ter. Ed.) Chapter I4.O, 
Sections lj.2G and lj.21 inclusive, and determine how the appropriation shall be raised, 
whether by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or otherwise, or do 
anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Water and Sewer Commissioners. 

Motion by Mr. Waldo A. Stevens: "I move that the Town vote to raise by borrowing and ap- 
propriate the sum of $25*000.00 for the purpose of laying a water main in Main Street of 



88 



ARTICLE 8 : (continued) 

not less than six inches, but less than sixteen inches in diameter in accordance with the 
recommendations of the Board of Water and Sewer Commissioners acting under the provisions 
of General Laws, Chapter I4.O, Sections I4.2G and I4.2I inclusive, and to meet such appropriation 
that the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, be and hereby is author- 
ized to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor, payable in not more than 15 years. 
Finance Committee approved a maximum of $25,000.00 to be raised by bond issue. Vote taken 
by voice. Voted unanimously. 

ARTICLE 9 : To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the 
purpose of developing a well field, for wells, and for the construction and equipment of 
a pumping station, on land owned by the Town on Main Street, formerly part of the Town Park, 
and determine how the appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation, by transfer from 
available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise, or do anything in relation thereto. Request 
of the Board of Water and Sewer Commissioners. 

Motion by Mr. Waldo A. Stevens: "I move that the Town vote to appropriate $14.5,000.00 for 
the purpose of developing a well field, for wells, and for the construction and equipment 
of a pumping station, on land owned by the Town on Main Street, formerly part of the Town 
Park, said appropriation to be reised as follows: $18,000.00 to be transferred from the 
Construction of Main Street Well Field and Station account, and $27» 000.00 to be raised by 
borrowing, and th8t the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, be and 
hereby is authorized to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor, payable in not more than 
15 years. Finance Committee approved a maximum of $14.5, 000. 00 to be raised by bond issue. 
A lengthy discussion followed, most of it against the use of the Ball Park for this purpose. 

Mr. Bouchard's opinion was sought. He said he thought that the Boards should get together 
and reconsider this program. 

A motion to close arguments was voted unanimously and so declared by the Moderetor. The 
vote on the main motion was taken by standing, the vote was as follows: Yes. . .17 
No. . .180 Motion was lost. 

A motion to adjourn was voted. Adjourned at 12:10 A.M. 
There were six hundred nine (609) voters present. 

Total Voted by Bond Issue $61j.7,000.00 



A true copy: 

Attest: (Mrs.) Esther L. Russell 

Town Clerk 



89 



WARRANT 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 



TO: Either of the Constables of the Town of Wilmington: 

GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and in the manner prescribed 
in the By-laws of said Town, you are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of 
the Town qualified to vote in Town affairs to meet and assemble at the 

HIGH SCHOOL CAFETERIA 
Saturday, the 7th Day of March, A. D. 1961; 

at 9:U£ o'clock in the forenoon, the polls to be opened at 10:00 a.m., and shall be closed 
at 8:00 p.m., for the election of Town Offices: 

ARTICLE 1 : To bring in your votes on one ballot respectively for the following named Office 
to wit: One Selectman for the term of three years; Two Members of the School Committee for 
the term of three years; One Moderator for the term of one year; and One Member of the 
Wilmington Housing Authority for the term of one year (to fill a vacancy). 

You are also hereby further required and directed to notify and warn the said inhabitants o 
the Town of Wilmington who are qualified to vote on elections and town affairs therein to 
assemble subsequently and meet in Town Meeting at the High School Gymnasium, Church Street, 
in said Town of Wilmington 

on 

Saturday, the llj.th Day of March, A. D. 1961; 
at 1:30 p.m., then and there to act on the following Articles: 



ARTICLE 2 : To hear the reports of Committees and act thereon. 

ARTICLE 3 ? To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Treasurer, with the approval 
of the Selectmen, to borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the 
financial year, beginning January 1, 1963>, and to issue notes therefor payable within one 
year, all in accordance with Section 1|. and 17, Chapter 1|1|., of the General Laws. 

ARTICLE Ij. : To see how much money the Town will appropriate for the expenses of the Town an 
Salaries of the several Town Offices, and Departments, and determine how the same shall be 
raised, whether by taxation, transfer from available funds, or otherwise, or do anything in 
relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 5 * To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, or transfer from available 
funds, and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of paying unpaid bills of previous 
years, or do anything in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 6 : To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation, or transfer from 
available funds and appropriate for the purchase of three vehicles for the use of the Polic 
Department, and authorize the sale or turn-in of one present vehicle used by the Police 
Department, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Town Manager. 

ARTICLE J : To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation, or transfer from 
available funds and appropriate for the purchase of two trucks for the use of the Highway 
Department and authorize the sale or turn-in of a truck presently used by the Highway 
Department, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Town Manager. 

ARTICLE 8 : To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation, or transfer from 
available funds and appropriate for the purchase of a truck for the use of the Highway 
Department and authorize the sale or turn-in of a truck presently used by the Highway Depar 
ment, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Town Manager. 



90 



ARTICLE 9: To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation, or transfer from 
available funds, and appropriate for the purchase of a vehicle for the use of the Fire Chief 
or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Town Manager. 

ARTICLE 10 : To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation, or transfer from 
available funds and appropriate for the purchase of a Truck with hydraulic bucket, brush 
shipper, and dump box for the use of the Tree Department, or do anything in relation thereto 
Request of the Town Manager. 

ARTICLE li t To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation, or transfer from 
available funds and appropriate for the purchase of an ambulance, and authorize the sale or 
turn-in of the present ambulance, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Town 
Manager. 

ARTICLE 12 : To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, or transfer from available 
funds, and appropriate a sum of money for the completion of planting strips and sidewalks on 
certain portions of Catherine Avenue, Barbara Avenue, and Arlene Avenue in a subdivision 
known as Elmwood Village, or take any action in relation thereto. Request of the Board of 
,Selectmen. 

ARTICLE 13 : To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way the layout of Dadant 
Drive as aoproved by the Planning Board and made by the Selectmen under the provisions of 
law relating to the assessment of Betterments, which layout is filed in the office of the 
Town Clerk, and which, with plans therein mentioned is hereby referred to for more particu- 
lar description; and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to take by the right of Eminent 
Domain such land, slope and drainage or other easements as may be necessary to effect the 
purpose of this Article, and to determine how an appropriation shall be raised, whether by 
taxation or by transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise, for the purpose 
pf constructing said way end for the payment of any damages resulting from the taking of 
land and slope easements and other easements therefor, or do anything in relation thereto. 
Request of the Board of Selectmen. 

\RTICLE llj. : To see if the Town xjill vote to accept as a public way the layout of Linda Road 
=3 approved by the Planning Board and made by the Selectmen under the provisions of law 
relating to the assessment of Betterments, which layout is filed in the office of the Town 
Clerk, and which, with plans therein mentioned, is hereby referred to for more particular 
iescription; and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to take by the Right of Eminent Domain 
mch land, slope and drainage or other easements as may be necessary to effect the purpose 
)f this Article, and to determine how an appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation 
>r by transfer from available funds, Dy borrowing, or otherwise, for the purpose of construe 
;ing said way and for the payment of any damages resulting from the taking of land and slope 
casements and other easements therefor, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of 
3oard of Selectmen. 

ARTICLE 15 : To see if the Town will vote to appropriate $250,000 r any lesser amount for 
;he purpose of constructing and originally equipping and furnishing a new Town Hall upon 
land already owned by the Town, and to determine how said appropriation is to be raised, 
jhether by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise, or do 
anything in relation thereto. Request of Board of Selectmen and Town Manager. 

ARTICLE 16 t To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $850.00 or 
tny amount, to be used to purchase from Rose Surrette for use in connection with the Police 
)epartment building, the parcel at the rear of her land on Middlesex Avenue, bounded and 
lescribed as follows, namely t Southeasterly by land of the Town, one hundred thirty-five 
tnd fifty-seven hundredths (135»57) feet; Southwesterly by land of the Town, seventy-eight 
ind seven hundredths (78*07) feet; Northwesterly by remaining land of Rose Surrette, one 
mndred thirty-four and forty-three hundredths (13k-»k-3) feet; and Northeasterly by land of 
slake, eighty seven and fifty-three hundredths (87.53) feet, and containing eleven thousand, 
>ne hundred sixty-two (11,162) square feet of land, be said area and said measurements 

ither more or less, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen 

nd Town Manager, 



91 



ARTICLE lj : To see if the Town will appropriate twenty-five cents ($0.25) on each $1,000 
of valuation to be raised by taxation for the purposes set forth in paragraphs 5» 6, and 7 
of Chapter l^., of the General Laws, or any of said purposes $15,000., or do anything in 
relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. 

ARTICLE 18 : To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Water Commissioners to 
purchase or take by Eminent Domain a certain parcel of land adjoining land owned by the 
Town on Main Street, and further to see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 
sum of money for the purpose of developing a well field, for wells, and for construction 
and equipment of a pumping station, on land owned by the Town on Main Street, and determine 
how the appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation, by transfer from available fund, 
by borrowing, or otherwise, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of 
Water Commissioners. 

ARTICLE 19 : To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the 
purpose of laying a water main in Williams Avenue of not less than six inches, but less 
than sixteen inches in diameter, in accordance with the recommendations of the Board of 
Water and Sewer Commissioners acting under the provisions of General Laws (Ter. Ed.) 
Chapter l\.0, Sections l±2 G to Ij2 I inclusive, and determine how the appropriation shall be 
raised, whether by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or otherwise, 
or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Water Commissioners. 

ARTICLE 20 : To see if the Town will vote to amend the building by-l8ws of the Town in the 
following respects : 

a. By striking out Divisions No. 2 to 17, both inclusive. 

b. By striking out Sections numbered 5l and 52 under the heading "Gas Pitting 
Regulations" . 

c. By adopting and inserting in place of said Divisions No. 2 to 17 inclusive, 
Parts 2 to 11 both inclusive, Sec. 6002 of Part 12, and the Appendix of the 
Uniform Building Code, 1961 Edition, Volume 1, prepared by the International 
Conference of Building Officials, a copy of which code is annexed to the 
warrant for this meeting, and another copy of which is on file with the 
Town Clerk. 

d. By adding a new Division 21, and including thereunder the text of said 
Sections 51 and 52, to be numbered respectively Section 1 and Section 2 
under said new Division heading; or do anything in relation thereto. 
Request of the Board of Selectmen, Town Manager and Building Inspector, 

ARTICLE 21 : To see if the Town will vote to amend the Building By-law of the Town by addin; 
to it the following division: 

"Division 19 - Validity and Penalty 
Section 1. If any portion of this by-law or any amendment thereto shall fail of 
approval by the Attorney General of the Commonwealth; or shall be held to be il- 
legal or invalid, the remaining portion shall remain in full force and effect. 

Section 2. Any person who shall violate any of the provisions of this by-law or 
any amendment thereto, or who shall fail or refuse to comply therewith; or who 
shall fail or refuse to comply with any order of the Building Inspector authorized 
thereunder, shall be liable for a fine of not over One Hundred Dollars. This 
penalty shall not preclude or prevent enforcement by actions in any court 
authorized by statute", or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the 
Building Inspector. 

ARTICLE 22 : To see if the Town will vote to accept Section 108G of Chapter lj.1 of the 
General Laws in regard to establishing minimum annual compensation of each regular police 
officer of the Police Department, or do anything in relation thereto. Petition of 
Charles L. Ellsworth and others. 



92 



ARTICLE 23 ; To see if the Town will vote to accept Section 108F of Chapter kl of the 
General Laws of Massachusetts as enacted by Chapter 520 of the Acts of 1962 which reads: 

"Section 108F. Not withstanding the provisions of any general or special law 
to the contrary, the minimum annual compensation of each firefighter permanently 
employed in the Fire Department of any city or town which accepts the pro- 
visions of this section, except a firefighter who, by virtue of Section 20D of 
Chapter 31 is not regarded as holding employment, shall be not less than the 
following: 

For the first year of service, five thousand five hundred dollars 
For the second year of service, six thousand dollars 

For the third and each succeeding year of service, six thousand three 
hundred dollars 

or do anything in relation thereto. Petition of Kenneth E. Marshall and others. 

ARTICLE 2k : "Shall certain provisions of Chapter 32B of the General Laws, authorizing any 
county, city, town or district to provide a plan of contributory group life insurance, 
group accidental death and dismemberment insurance, and group general or blanket hospital, 
surgical and medical insurance for certain persons in the service of such county, city, 
town or district and their dependents, be accepted by this town?" or do anything in rela- 
tion thereto. Request of Francis E. Downs, and others. 

ARTICLE 25 - To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-law, Section 111-1-A (1) 
by inserting the word "single", so it will read: (1) One single family detached dwelling, 
or do anything in relation thereto. Petition of the Building Inspector. 

ARTICLE 26 : To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning Map by placing on said map, 
superimposed over the existing magnetic arrow; a double barbed directional arrow whose 
direction shall indicate the north point of the system established in Section 8 & 9, 
Chapter 97 > General Laws, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Building 
Inspector. 

ARTICLE 27 : To see if the Town will vote to amend Section VIII-2B of the Zoning By-law to 
add paragraph J to read as follows: "J. Authorize an exception to height, area and yard 
regulations as set up in Section V-l" , or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the 
Board of Appeals. 

ARTICLE 28 : To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-law and Map by changing 
from Single Residence A District to Industrial District the following described parcel of 
land: Beginning at a point on Middlesex Avenue one hundred fifty (150' ) feet north of a 
stone bound at the north side of First Avenue the line runs easterly seven hundred six and 
71/100 (706.71') feet parallel with First Avenue to the line of the Boston & Maine Railroad; 
thence southeasterly by said Boston & Main Railroad two thousand six hundred fourteen 
(26lk' ) feet more or less to a point on a line one hundred (100') feet north and parallel 
with Concord Street; thence northwesterly by said line parallel with and one hundred (100 1 ) 
feet north of said Concord Street one thousand five hundred eighty-five (1585' ) feet more 
or less to a ditch at land now or formerly of Frank and Marjory Stevens; thence north- 
easterly by said ditch and by said Stevens' land one hundred sixty-eight (168' ) feet more 
or less to a corner at land now or formerly of Paul and Doris Reitchel, Jr., and by land 
now or formerly of Ernest W. and Rose M. Eames; thence easterly by said ditch and by land 
of said Reitchels' one hundred ninety-two (192') feet more or less to a corner at land of 
said Eames and at land now or formerly of Christina Lopez; thence northerly by another 
ditch by land of said Lopez two hundred fourteen and 5/100 (21k. 05' ) feet more or less to 
a stake at the upland; thence northwesterly by land of said Lopez five hundred eighty-four 
and 9/100 (58k o 09' ) feet more or less to a corner; thence northwesterly by land of said 
Lopez sixty-five (65') feet more or less; thence northeasterly by a line parallel with 
Mystic Avenue seven hundred thirty-seven and 5k/l00 (737»5k') feet more or less; thence 
westerly five hundred sixty-four and 76/100 (56k. 76') feet more or less to a point at 
Middlesex Avenue; thence northerly on a line of said Middlesex Avenue fifty (50') feet to 
the point of beginning, or do anything in relation thereto. Petition of James A. Mackey 
and others. 



93 



ARTICLE 29 : To see if the Town wil] vote to amend the Zoning By-law and Map by rezoning 
from SRA to Industrial the area described: Beginning on Maple Meadow Brook at Main Street 
thence easterly along Maple Meadow Brook to a point 600 feet distant from Main Street; 
thence northwesterly and 600 feet distant from Main Street to Gross Street; thence south- 
westerly along Cross Street to Main Street; thence south southeasterly along Main Street tc 
point of beginning, or do anything in relation thereto. Petition of Joseph G. Yentile and 
others . 

ARTICLE 30 : To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-law and Map by changing 
to Industrial that parcel of land on the West side of Ballardvale Street to the Andover 
line startinr at the New England Power Transmission line and properties now or formerly of 
Evans and Murphy and continuing North to the Andover line, or do anything in relation 
thereto. Petition of Fred F. Cain and others. 

ARTICLE 31 ; To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-law by establishing a new 
zoning district to be known as "Garden Apartment District" and that the following sections 
be added to the Zoning By-law: 

Section I-2-A 

7. Garden Apartment District (GA) 
Section III-5 Uses in Garden Apartment Districts 

A. In a Gprden Apartment District the following uses are hereby permitted: 

1. Any use permitted without appeal in a Rural District or in a Single 
Residence A District or Single Residence B District as permitted 
therein. 

2. Garden Apartments provided that the Board of Appeals at the public 
hearing shall find and determine that such buildings and use in- 
cluding the site, plans and building design constitute a desirable 
development in and will not be detrimental to the neighborhood and 
subject further to the following conditions: there shall be at 
least two detached or semi-detached buildings and no such buildings 
shall contain less than four nor more than twelve dwelling units and 
each such unit shall have independent cooking facilities; there 
shall be parking space for automobiles provided on the lot which 
shall not be less then one reasonably accessible automobile space 
for each dwelling unit; and such other conditions and restrictions 
as the Board of Appeals m8y prescribe in the interest of the Town 
and carrying out the purpose of this By-Law, 

3. Garden Apartments may be combined on the same lot or on several 
lots if approved by the Board of Appeals provided the requirements 
of Section V-l are complied with, 

L|.. Upon receipt of an application to determine that a proposed Garden 
Apartment use including the site, plans and building design con- 
stitute a desirable development in and will not be detrimental to 
the neighborhood, the Board of Appeals shall transmit to the 
Planning Board the application and plans. The Planning Board 
shall consider the same and shall render an advisory opinion to 
the Board of Appeals, which Board shall not approve any such appli- 
cation or plans until such advisory report of the Planning Board 
has been submitted to it or until thirty days have elapsed after 
transmittal to the Planning Board of the application and plans 
without such advisory report being submitted. 



ARTICL?: 31 (continued) ; 



Section IV-1 Street Frontage for Dwellings 

In a Pural District, a Single Residence A District or Single Hesidence B District 
or a Neighborhood Business District or Garden Apartment District, eny buildings 
hereafter erected for use as a dwelling shall be located on a lot that fronts upon 
an accepted street or that has a permanent means of access not less then thirty 
feet in width to such street or way. 

Section IV -2 Application of Residential Requir ements 

In a Neighborhood Business or General Business District or in an Industrial 
District or Garden Apartment District, any buildings erected that are devoted 
entirely or in part to a dwelling shall conform to the requirements for uses 
permitted without appeal in the Single Residence 3 District for ell floors of 
the buildings devoted entirely in part to such residential use as specified in 
the Schedule shown on Section V-l. 

Section Via Garden Apartment (GA) 

No building shall exceed two and one-half stories and a maximum height of forty 
feet (the limitation of height in feet snail not apply to chimneys, ventilators, 
sky-lights, tanks, bulk heads, penthouses and other accessories, structural 
features usually carried above roofs provided such features are in no way used 
for living purposes). For each lot on which Garden Apartments are to be erected, 
a frontage of not less than two hundred feet upon the frontage street shall be 
required; for each such building, a front yard of not less than thirty feet in 
depth; a sideyard on each side of not less tnan thirty feet in width and a rear 
yard of not less th8n thirty feet in depth shell be required. Land area for 
each lot on which Garden Apartments are to be erected shall be not less than 
three thousand square feet per dwelling unit containing one room used for sleep- 
ing, thirty-five hundred square feet per dwelling unit containing two rooms used 
for sleeping and four thousand square feet per dwelling unit containing three 
or more rooms used for sleeping. 

Section VIII-2BJ 

Hear and decide apnlications for use in Garden Apartment Districts as specified 
in Section IIT-5; or do anything in relation thereto. Petition of Sarle S. 
Hamilton and others. 

ARTICLE 32 : To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-law and Map by changing 
from Single Residence A District to Garden Apartment District the following described parcel 
J of land: Commencing on Hoburn Street at the Southeasterly corner of a parcel of land owned 
by H. Smith, thence running westerly six hundred sixteen (616) feet, more or less, and two 
hundred thirty-two (232) feet, more or less, thence running northeasterly two hundred fifty- 
two (2^2) feet, more or less, and two hundred thirty-two (232) feet, more or less, thence 
running easterly one hundred ninety-one feet (191), more or less, and two hundred sixty (260) 
feet, more or less, thence running southerly by end along Woburn Street, two hundred ninety- 
one (291) feet, more or less, and two hundred twenty (220) feet, more or less, to the point 
of beginning; or do anything in relation thereto. Petition of Harold E. Smith and others, 

ARTICLE 33 : To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-law changing from Single 
Residence A to Industrial, the following described parcel of land: Starting at a point on 
Kilmarnock Street, v ilmington, and running south 8 o 02«07" east nine hundred seventy -eight 
and 22/100 (978.22) feet to an iron post; thence turning and running north 32 ' 2t|." west 
eleven hundred fifty-four and 56/100 (115'].. 56) feet to an iron post and Kilmarnock Street, 
land thence running along Kilmarnock Street north 8Ij. 22 1 east one hundred seventy-six and 
90/100 (176.90) feet to an iron post; thence continuing along Kilmarnock Street north 87°J-J-1 ' 
east one hundred thirty-nine and 6/100 (139.06) feet, thence continuing along Kilmarnock 
Street south 81 52' 56" east one hundred twenty -four end iiO/100 ( 12^.11.0) feet to en iron post; 
thence continuing along Kilmarnock Street south 81 52' 56 east fifty-one and 17/100 (51.17) 
feet to point of beginning, 

95 



ARTICLE 33 (continued) : 

Said plot of lend is shown in a plan of land filed with the Town Clerk on January 17, 1963 
and known as "Land in Wilmington, Mass. Dec. 1962" and drawn by Gordon E. Ainsworth, 
Registered Surveyor, or do anything in relation thereto. Petition of Raymond P. Fitzmaurice 
and others. 

ARTICLE 3U ; To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-law and Map by changing 
from Single Residence B District to Garden Apartment District the following described parcel I 
of land: Commencing at the relocation of Route 62 at the Southwesterly corner of a parcel 
of land owned by E. S. Hamilton, thence running northerly one hundred ninety (190) feet, 
more or less, thence running westerly four hundred (L|.00) feet, more or less, thence running j 
northerly again by Middlesex Avenue, forty (1|.0) feet, thence running easterly one hundred 
fifty and 79/100 (150.79) feet, thence running northwesterly one hundred forty-four and 
5U/100 ( IJ4.I4. . Sh ) feet, thence running easterly forty (I4.O) feet, thence running northwesterly j 
three hundred sixty-five and 7I4./IOO (365.7U-) feet, thence running easterly one hundred 
thirty-five and 33/100 (135*33) feet, thence running southeasterly one hundred sixty-five 
0.65) feet, more or less, thence running northeasterly one hundred seventy (170) feet, more 
or less, thence running northeasterly one hundred seventy (170) feet, more or less, thence 
running northeasterly again, forty (£j.O ) feet, more or less, thence running northerly fifty I 
(50) feet, more or less, thence running northeasterly by two distances measuring respectively 
seventy-five (75) feet, more or less, and seventy (70 feet, more or less, thence running 
northwesterly two hundred fifty (250) feet, more or less, thence running northeasterly by 
several distances measuring respectively, one hundred seventy (170) feet more or less, one 
hundred sixty (160) feet, more or less, and one hundred fifty (150) feet, more or less, 
thence running northerly two hundred eighty (280) feet, more or less, to Salem Street, 
thence running easterly by and along Salem Street by two distances measuring respectively 
one hundred ninety (190) feet, more or less, and eighty-nine (89) feet, more or less, thence j 
running southerly by and along Route 93 seven hundred forty-five and 19/100 (7i4-5.19) feet, 
more or less, thence running southwesterly seven hundred sixty-six and 76/100 (766.76) 
feet, more or less, thence running across the relocation of Route 62 in a southeasterly 
direction, one hundred (100) feet more or less, thence running northeasterly two hundred 
forty (2l|0) feet, more or less, thence running easterly by the relocation of Route 93, six 
hundred (600) feet, more or less, thence running southeasterly two hundred seventy-five 
(275) feet, more or less, thence running westerly one hundred thirty (130) feet, more or 
less, thence running southerly three hundred forty (3^0) feet, more or less, to High Street, 
thence running westerly by and along High Street, forty-five (I4.5) feet, more or less, thence 
running northerly three hundred forty ( 3^4-0 ) feet, more or less, thence running westerly 
seven hundred thirty-five (735) feet, more or less, thence running northerly three hundred 
(300) feet, more or less, thence running westerly two hundred twenty (220) feet, more or les 
thence running northwesterly seventy (70) feet, more or less, thence running southwesterly 
to the point of beginning; or do anything in relation thereto. Petition of Earle S. Hamilto 
and others. 

ARTICLE 35 * To see if the Town will vote to rescind the action taken at the town meeting 
held August 6, 1928, whereby the Planning Board was authorized to act as Park Commissioners 
or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen and Town Manager. 

ARTICLE 36 : To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation, or transfer from 
available funds, and appropriate for the purpose of constructing drainage systems to relieve 
drainage problems at various locations within the Town, or do anything in relation thereto* 
Request of the Board of Selectmen and Town Manager. 

ARTICLE 37 : To see if the Town will accept the provisions of G. L. Chapter ifO, Section 8C, 
providing for the appointment of a Conservation Commission, or do anything in relation 
thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. 

ARTICLE 38 : To see what amount the town will vote to raise and appropriate for the expenses 
of the Conservation Commission, if the vote under the preceding article shall have been in 
the affirmative, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. 

ARTICLE 39 : To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of One Thousand 

Dollars (1,000.00) for the observance of Memorial Day and that the Moderator appoint a 

Committee who shall arrange and have charge of such observance, or do anything in relation 
thereto. 



96 



ARTICLE kO : To see if the Town will vote to raise end appropriate a sum of money for the 
improvement , development and maintenance of the Ipswich River (Chapter 91 Project (' or take 
any action in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen and Town Manager. 

ARTICLE tfcl : To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of Seven Hundred 
Fifty Dollars ($7!?0.00) for the purpose of renewing under authority of Section 9 of Chapter 
kO of the General Laws as amended, the lease of the American Legion Clubhouse, Inc., in 
Wilmington for the purpose of providing suitable headquarters for the Wilmington Post No. 
136 of the American Legion, or do anything in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE k2 ; To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of Seven Hundred 
Fifty Dollars ($750.00) for the purpose of renewing under authority of Section 9 of Chapter 
kO of the General Laws as amended, the lease of the Veterans of Foreign Wars Clubhouse on 
Main Street for the purpose of providing suitable headquarters for the Nee-Ellsworth Post 
2k58 of the Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States, or do anything in relation 
thereto. 

ARTICLE 14.3 : To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money under the 
authority of Section 9 of Chapter 1+0 of the General Laws, as amended, for the purpose of 
providing suitable quarters for the William F. Tattersall Chapter No. 106, Disabled American 
Veterans, located in Wilmington, Mass., or do anything in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE kk ; To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of One Hundred 
Dollars ($100.00) the money to be expended under the direction of the k-H Town Committee, 
serving in cooperation with the Middlesex County Extension Service, under the provisions of 
Sections kO to k£, Chapter 128, General Laws of Massachusetts, or do anything in relation 
thereto. 

ARTICLE To see if the Town will vote to accept Sections 32 to k7, inclusive, of Chapter 

llj.7, of the General Laws, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Wilmington 
Boosters Club, 



97 



Town Accountant 



ANALYSIS OF THE CASH ACCOUNT - for the year ending December 31. 1963 

RECEIPTS FOR THE YEAR 1963 

Balance as at January 1, 1963 ^ 369,ij.05.57 

Add: Cash Receipts January 1 through December 31 » 1962 5, 674,710.61 

6,0144,116.10 

Deduct: Auditors Adjustment (check In Litigation) 2,800.00 

Cash Expenditures during 1963 6,079,715.17 6.082.515.17 

38,398.99 

Treasury Bills Purchased 1.009. 423. 51 

Balance on Hand as of December 31, 1963 971,024.52 

ANALYSIS OF CASH RECEIVED 
TAXES 

Tax Collections: 

Prior Years' Levy: Poll 191*.. 00 

S Personal Property 2,1|70.75 

s Real Estate 81,481.08 82*., 345,83 

Current Levy: Poll 6 , 006 . 00 

j Personal Property 60,869.16 

Real Estate 2.024.474.65 2,091,1*29.81 
i Betterments Added to Taxes: 

Prior years: Water Assessments 1,118.77 

Street Assessments 79.79 1,198.56 

Current Levy: Water Assessments 5*902.53 

Street Assessments 6,949.26 12,851.79 
Unapportioned Assessments: 

J Water 11,231.34 

Street 8,182.83 19,11-1^.17 
Apportioned Assessments Paid in Advance: 

Water 3»477.64 

Street 4. 823.53 8,301.17 
Water Liens added to Taxes: 

Prior levies 1,080.11 

Current Levy 5.463.19 6.543.30 2,223, 884. 63 

Tax Titles Redeemed 12,959.07 

AMOUNTS BORROWED 

Short Term: 

To pay expenditures of Town Depts. 

until taxes are collected 1,000,000.00 
To carry on Chapter 81 & Chapter 90 
oontraot work until State & County 

reimbursements are received 22,800.00 
Temporary Loans/Anticipation of Bond 

Issues 100,000.00 1,122,800.00 



98 



AMOUNTS BORROWED (Continued) 



Long Term: 

Proceeds from Sale of Bonds 
Woburn Street School 
Water Betterments (Main St.) 
Street Betterments (Cedar Crest Rd.) 



597,000.00 
25,000.00 

25,ooo»oo 



GRANTS AND GIFTS 



6/4.7,000*00 



1,769,800.00 



32,358.90 
/+, 6/4.6.14.1 
14.6,510.73 
1,531.82 



2"lbo" 
3A60.56 
i;^.30 
Ij.68.8l 



Federal Grants and Gifts : 
Charities : 

Aid to Dependent Children, Aid 

Aid to Dependent Children, Admin. 

Old Age Assistance, Assistance 

Old Age Assistance, Admin. 

Medical Assistance for Aged, Aid 

Medical Assistance for Aged, Admin, 

Disability Assistance, Assistance 

Disability Assistance, Admin. 
Schools : 

Public Law #8714. 

National Defense Education Act 85/86I4. 
Public Grants : 

Construction Grants-in-Aid (Highways) 
Comm. of Mass. - Chapter 8l & 90 
Middlesex County Treas. - Chapter 90 

AGENCY AND TRUST FUNDS 

Federal Withholding Tax Deductions 
State Withholding Tax Deductions 
Retirement System Deductions 
Group Life Insurance Deductions 
Employer Group Life Insurance Dividend 
U. S. Savings Bonds Deductions 
Blue Cross/Blue Shield Deductions 

Fish & Game Licenses Collected for Dept. of Conservation 
"Dog Licenses Collected for County Treasurer 
Cemetery Perpetual Care Funds 

REVOLVING FUNDS 



37,005.31 

50,0/4.2.55 

27,1+96.63 

2, 12/4.. 11 

31, 68/4.. 00 
U4.,l/4.9.97 



22,509.87 
3,685.87 



249,679.07 
21,952.7/j- 
35,8/4.0.00 
i4.,220.00 
3,500.00 
609.31 
19,319.32 
2,709.50 
2,8/4.1.00 
600.00 



188,698.31 



3/4.1,270.9/4. 



School Lunch Program Reoeipts 

High School Athletic Association Receipts 



RESTRICTED RECEIPTS 



Water Guaranteed Deposits 
Sewer Guaranteed Deposits 
Recoveries, O.A.A. Lien Law 
Recoveries, Veterans Lein Law 
Sale of Cemetery Lots Fund 
Sale of Tax Possessions 
Accrued Interest/Sale of Bonds 
Premium/Sale of Bonds 
Water Department: 
Rates 

Water Services 
Sewer Rates 
Sewer Servioes 



135,161.5/4. 
ii.39i4-.75 



29,907.53 
1,520.00 
3,966.91 
857. kO 
k,koo,oo 

106.68 
2,618.55 
14.12.79 

162,1+24.6.14.0 
2,114.3.91 
23,678.81 



139,556.29 



14.3,789.86 



188,273.56 



99 



RESTRICTED RECEIPTS (continued) 



Refunds : 

To Appropriations 
To Surplus Revenue 
To Water Maintenance 
To Petty Cash Advances 



y 

L 
<& 
w 

A 
J 

% 
'Z 





ESTIMATED RECEIPTS 



Income Taxes 

Corporation Taxes 

Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes: 

Prior Years' Levy 

Current Levy 
Farm Animal Excise-Current Levy 
Meal Taxes, State 
Loss of Taxes, State 
Licenses, Liquor 
Interest & Costs: 

Tax Titles Redeemed 

Tax Collections 
General Government 

Selectmen's Receipts 

Town Collector 

Town Clerk 
Protection of Person & Property: 

Police Department 

Ambulance Service Collections 

Building Inspector: 
Wire Permits 
Plumbing Permits 
Gas Permits 
Building Permits 

Sealer of Weights & Measures 
Public Works: 

Town Engineer 

Highway Department 

Cemetery Receipts 
Board of Health: 

Public Nurse Receipts 

Health and Sanitation Receipts 

Clinics 

Charities & Soldier's Benefits: 

General Relief 

Aid to Dependent Children 

Old Age Assistance 

Medical Assistance for Aged 

Disability Assistance 

Veterans Aid 

Rent of Quarters 
Schools and Libraries: 

Adult Evening School 

School Construction Reimbursements 

School Transportation 

Vocational Education Reimbursements 

Division of Child Guardianship 

Miscellaneous Receipts 

Library Pines 

State Aid to Libraries 



10A56.5U 

355.20 
171.1+3 
15.00 



199,652.1+6 
27.336.00 

31,21^.09 
192.251.U0 



1.337.U8 
5.736.20 

595.50 
1,171.25 
3.506.63 

338.00 
1,659.00 

1,669.15 
1,265.00 
256.00 
1,U62.00 



306 . 00 
1U3.06 
3,621.50 

U06.00 
1,371.75 
1,690.59 

l,8k9.U3 
12,68U.56 

20,7U3.U7 
17.925.U8 
2,U80.72 
21,923.89 



2,781.60 

113.27U.U1 
U2,66U.75 
U,333.79 
15,928.32 
762. 9U 
1,397.79 
3,118.75 



10,698.171 



226, 988.U6. 



223,U95.US 
267.16 
3,808.66 
70.82 

U,ooo.oc 



7,073.68 

5,273.36 
1.997.0C 



U, 652. 13 
88. 0C 



U,070.5t 
3,U68.3U 



77,607.55 
383. U f 



18U,262.35 



100 



ESTIMATED RECEIPTS (continued) 



Miscellaneous Receipts: 

Recoveries Insurance Claims 
N. E. Tel & Tel Commissions 
Recoveries Bond Forfeiture 
2j.th District Court Fines 
Dog License Reimbursements, County 
Director of Standards, Licenses 
Sale of Obsolete Equipment 
Beach Tags 

Miscellaneous Receipts 
TOTAL RECEIPTS FOR YEAR ENDING 12/31/63 



61.15 
133.61 

5,000.00 
I4.89.00 

2,171.62 
19.00 
202.00 
14.7.00 
11+9.27 



8,272.65 
5,67lj.,710.6l 



ANALYSIS OF FEDERAL GRANTS 



Charities ; 

Aid to Dependent Children, Aid 
Aid to Dependent Children, Admin. 



Old Age Assistance, Assistance 
Old Age Assistance, Administration 



Medical Assistance for Aged, Assist, 
Medical Assistance for Aged, Admin. 



Disability Assistance, Assistance 
Disability Assistance, Administration 



Balances 
as at 



13,1214..^ 
1, 122.k7 

iV.^Jl 

11,619.18 
8k0.73 
12,1+59.91 



317.27 
329.77 
6I4.7.6I+ 



Received 
during 
1963 



32,358.90 
1+, 61+6. 1+1 
37,065. 



3T 



*4+7, 186.26 
.82 

ro"E 



9,798.12 *2l+,036.07 
565.86 3.1+60.56 
16,363.98 27,196.63 



2,71+1.50 
I4.68.8l 
3,210.31 



♦Includes transfer of $ 675.53 from Recoveries Account 

1.086.20 

I775T7T3 



Schools : 

George Barden Fund 
Special Account P/L #8714. 
National Defense Education Act 
P/L #85-8614. 



137.00 
15,214.5.1+6 

7.505.80 
22, 008.26 



ll4-.099.67 
14.5,703.67 



Expended 
during 
1963 



38,386.91 
5,032.79 
14.3,1+19.70 

14.9,514.9.36 
2.081.67 
5i;63l.03 

30,983.53 

3^t^6T07 

3,232.39 
650.16 
3,B82.55 



31,6814.. 00 25,14.63.63 



31,319.614. 



Balance 

as at 
12/31/63 



7,096.13 
736.09 
7,832.22 

9,256.08 
2.290.88 
11,514.6.96 

2,850.66 

3,8^!^ 

• 173.62 
11+8.1+2 
- 2572(3 



137.00 
21,14.65.83 

l ?|7U9.1f6 
37,352.29 



101 



DISBURSEMENTS FROM GENERAL ACCOUNTS 
ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES OTHER THAN THAT RAISED FROM 
APPROPRIATION FOR THE YEAR ENDING 12/31/63 



Petty Cash Advances 
U. S. Treasury Bills 
Refunds : 

Foil Taxes 1963 
Personal Property 1962 
Real Estate Taxes I960 
1961 
1962 
1963 

Motor Vehicle Excise 1962 

1963 

Assessments Added to Taxes: 

Water 

Street 
Committed Interest: 

Water 

Street 
Water Leins 1962 
1963 

Tax Titles 

Unapportioned Assessments: 

Water 

Street 
Water Rates 

Water Assessments, Paid in Advance 

Guaranteed Deposits 

Sale of Cemetery Lots 

Estimated Receipts 

Surplus Revenue 
Water Maintenance and Operation 
Construction Main Street Well Field 
Legal Settlements 
State & County Assessments: 

County Hospital Assessment 

County Retirement Assessment 

County Tax Assessment 

State Audit Assessment 

State Parks 

M.D.C. Sewer Charges 
Carter Lecture Fund 
Temporary Loans/Anticipated Revenue 

Anticipated Reimbursement 
Anticipated Serial Issue 
School Lunch Program 
High School Athletic Association 
Cemetery Perpetual Care 
Federal Grants & Aid: 

Public Law 87I* (Schools) 

Public Law 85/861* (Schools) 

Aid to Dependent Children, Aid 

Aid to Dependent Children, Administration 

Old Age Assistance, Aid 

Old Age Assistance, Administration 

Medical Assistance for Aged, Aid 

Medical Assistance for Aged, Administration 

Disability Assistance, Aid 

Disability Assistance, Administration 



15. 0( 
1,009,1*23.53 



81.60 
170.85 
675.28 
7.397.60 
2,866.11* 
5,9i3.oi 



18.09 
H3.95 



14.00 
.80 



8,325.33 

8,773.15 

26.12 
52.11 

15.68 
62.18 

132.01* 
18.00 

165.31* 
1*33.55 
1,181.13 
1.78 
5,858.71* 
1*0.00 
21.71 
621*. 00 



25,71*5.66 
133,613.17 
3.6C 
1*, 966.52 

8,378.1<; 
37.321.8£ 
21,1*85.16 
153.16 
5,365.9S 
36,116.21| 
307.0C 
1,000,000.0C 
1*7, 575.0C 
100,000.0C 
125,79l*.2lj 
8,l82.0S 
600. 0C 

25,1*63.63 
5.906. 31 

38,386.91 
5,032.79 

1*9,51*9.36 
2,081.67 

30,931.0j 
3,003.3* 
3,232.39 
650.16 



102 



Dog Licenses Due County 3,029.75 

Fish & Game Licenses Due Commonwealth 2, 519.50 

Blue Cross-Blue Shield 17,652.514. 

Group Life Insurance -Employer 1,639.56 

Group Life Insurance - Deductions }± t 736.38 

U. S. Savings Bonds 599.95 

Retirement Deductions 35,814.0.00 

State Withholding Taxes 21,952.714. 

Federal Withholding Taxes 214.9,679.07 

TOTAL DISBURSEMENTS FROM GENERAL ACCOUNTS 2,933,310.76 



103 



ANALYSIS OP THE MATURING DEBT 





Da lancss 


A i4 H ar\ 


re lu u 1 1 


d8 lance 3 




1/1/62 


iqAi 




12/^1 /A 7 


INSIDE DEBT LIMIT! 










o-h Rr-Vinnl T nar\ Ar»t- 7Pl/li7 










$26^. 000.00 


85.000 




15,000 


70 000 


J-j J. O I'l * O U I1U \J X JjUoII y W 11UWUUU 

G/L Sec. 10 $512,000.00 










275. 000 




25, 000 


250.000 












G/L Sec. 10 $60,000.00 


15, ooo 




5, ooo 


10,000 


Public Sewer Mains 










G/L I44 Sec. 10 $106,000.00 


lj.6,000 




15,000 


31,000 


Street Construction Bonds (1958) 










G/L kk Sec. 10 $60,000.00 


36,000 




6,000 


30,000 


Street Construction Bonds (i960) 










G/L I4.I4. Sec. 10 $13,000.00 


3,000 




3,000 




Street Construction Bonds (362) 


39,750 








G/L Sec. 10 $39,750.00 




10,750 


29,000 


Street Construction Bonds (363) 










G/L I4I4. Sec. 10 $25,000 




25,000 




25,000 


Public Works Bldg. & Police Station 










Bonds. G/L I4J4. Sec. 10 $ll|.0, 000.00 


98,000 




lit. 000 


811,000 




597.750 


25,000 


93! 7*0 


529,000 



OUTSIDE DEBT LIMIT : 

High School Loan Acts 321/1^7 

$200,000.00 
Add. & Alter. Jr/Sr. High School 

Acts 61J.5A8 $1,375,000.00 
Add. & Alter. Jr. /Sr. High School 

Acts 6I4.5A8 $14.00,000.00 
Glen Road School Bonds Acts 6I4.5A8 

$14.50,000.00 
Boutwell Street School Bonds 

Acts 6I4.5A8 $14.00,000.00 
North Intermediate School Bonds 

Acts 6I4.5/I4.8 $1,050,000.00 
School Projects Loans (562) 

Acts 614.5A8 $68,14.25.00 
Woburn Street School Bonds (363) 

Acts 614.5 A8 $597,000.00 
Water Bonds, New Wellfield 

Chap. I44. Sec. 8 $60,000.00 
Water Meters, Improving Exist. 

System & Betterments, Chap. I4J4. 

Sec. 8 $114.5,000.00 
Water Standpipe Bonds, Chap. ijif. 

Sec. 8 $152,000.00 
Water Main Bonds (1957), Chap. I4J4. 

Sec. 8 $35,000.00 
Water Main Bonds (1958), Chap. I4I4. 

Sec. 8 $50,000.00 
Water Main Bonds (361), Chap. I4J4. 

Sec. 8 $5,000.00 
Water Main Bonds (661), Chap. I4J4. 

Sec. 8 $7,200.00 
Water Bonds New Wellfield (36I) 

Chap. I4J4. , Sec. 8 $90,000.00 
Water Main Bonds (362) 

Chap. I44, Sec. 8 $86,000.00 
Water Main Bonds (363) 

Chap. kk P Sec. 8 $25,000.00 

COMBINED TOTALS 



80,000 
875,000 
320,000 
350,000 
350,000 
990,000 

68,14.25 

20,000 

63,000 
110,000 
15,000 
3l4-,000 

3,000 

1|.,800 
80,000 
86,000 

3,W,225 
k. 014-6. ,975 



597,000 



25.000 
622,000 

6I4.7.OOO 



10,000 
75,000 

20,000 
25,000 
25,000 
55,ooo 
5,1*25 

5,000 

7,000 
10,000 
5,000 

l4.,000 
2,000 
2,14.00 
10,000 
11,000 

271,825 



56,000 
100,000' 

10,000, 

30,000 

1,000 

2,14.00 

70,000 

75,000 

25.000 
3,799,14-00 

k. 328 .14.00 



1014. 



COMPARISON OF ESTIMATED RECEIPTS 
USED BY THE ASSESSORS IN SETTING THE 1963 TAX RATE 
WITH THE ACTUAL RECEIPTS OF THE YEAR 12/31/63 

Used by the Actual Receipts Receipts 

Assessors on 1963 more than less than 

the 1963 Rate Receipts Estimated Estimated 

Income Taxes 201,2/44.36 199,652.14.6 1,591.90 

Corporation Taxes 26,125.79 27,336.00 1,210.21 

Reimbursement Publicly Owned Land 70.82 70.82 

Old Age Meal Tax 3,767.20 3,808.68 41. 48 

Motor Vehicle Excise Tax 229,000.00 214,722.34 14,277.66 

Licenses 4,000.00 4,000.00 

Special Assessments 2,000.00 19,1+87.57 17,487.57 

General Government 4,500.00 5,272.38 772.38 

Protection of Persons & Property 4,800.00 5,078.15 278.15 

Health & Sanitation 1,800.00 3,468.35 1,668.34 

Charities (Other than Grants) 40,4°0.00 35,660.73 4,739.27 

Old Age Assistance (Other than Grants) 20,100.00 20,766.20 666.20 

Veterans Services 18,600.00 21,923.89 3,323.89 

Sohools (Income Tax excluded) 67,800.00 66,471.40 1,328.60 

Libraries 1, 181.25 4, 516.54 3,335.29 

Cemeteries 3,300.00 3,621.50 321.50 

Interests 7,100.00 7,069.37 30.63 

School Construction Reimbursement 

(State) 113,274.14.1 113,274.41 

Farm Animal Excise Tax 350.00 267.18 82.82 

Sewer Rentals 24,262.94 24,262.94 

Unclassified 1,800.00 1,061.09 738.91 

Reimbursement-County Dog Officer 2,171,62 2,171.62 

Collection of Bond Forfeiture 5,000.00 5,000.00 

4th District Court Fines 489.00 489.00 

Ambulance Service Collections 1,659.00 1,659.00 

TOTALS 751,213.83 791,111.61 62,687.57 22.789.79 



SCHEDULE OF SHORT TERM LOANS 



Temporary Loans in Anticipation of 
Tax Collections 

Temporary Loans in Anticipation of 
Reimbursement (Highways) 

Temporary Loans in Anticipation of 
Serial Issues/Bonds 



Balance 
as at 

1/1/63 



Added 
during 
1963 



Paid off 
during 
1963 



1,000,000.00 1,000,000.00 



Balances 
as at 

12/31/63 



47,575.00 22,800.00 47,575.00 22,800.00 



100,000.00 100,000.00 



TOTALS 



47,575.oo 1,122,800.00 1,147,575.00 22,800.00 



105 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
BALANCE SHEET - December 31, 1963 



ASSETS 



Cash Overdrawn 

Cash Invested in Treasury Bills 

Net Cash Position 
Petty Cash Advances 
Taxes Uncollected : 
Prior Levies: 

Poll 1958 
1959 
1960 
1961 
1962 
1963 
1960 
1961 
1962 
1963 
1961 
1962 
1963 

1958 
1959 
1960 
1961 
1962 
1963 



Personal 



Real Estate 



8.00 
10.00 
28.00 
52.00 
102.00 
361t.O O 



Motor Vehicle Excise : 
Levy: 



Assessments Added t o Taxes : 

19"62 



Water - Levy 
Street - Levy 
Water Interest 
Street Interest 



1963 
1962 
1963 
1962 
1963 
1962 
1963 



27.20 
58k.56 
8(5.83 
3.369.65 
529.37 
16,897.09 
88.029.25 

12k. 02 
566.97 
815.89 
1,130.52 
3,223.^9 



12k. 65 
725.16 
15.82 

kJ+5.90 
10.12 
570.68 



Unapportloned Assessments : 
Water 
Street 

Water Liens Added to Taxes 
Levy 1962 
1963 

Estate of Deceased Persons Tax 1963 

Tex Titles 

Tax Possessions 

Water & Sewer Department 
Water Rates 
Water Services 
Sewer Rates 
Sewer Services 

Accounts Receivable 

General Relief l,k55.63 

Aid to Dependent Children 5,287.12 

Old Age Assistance 59.11 

Veterans Aid 10,720.76 

Ambulance Services 2,553.00 

Highway Department 97.00 

County Aid to Highways 

State Aid to Highways 

Unprovided For Accounts/Overdrafts 

Overlay - Levy 1958 2.00 

1960 k5l.k0 

1961 151.09 
Overdrafts/Appropriations : 

Fire Dept. Salaries 2,252.88 
Snow & Ice Removal 20,000.00 
Veterans Benefits 5«62k.l8 

Legal Settlements 

Prior Years 1,200.00 
Current Year k, 966. 52 

County & State Assessment 
Underestimates 

County Tax 1963 103. 8l 

State Parka 1963 589.k5 

Due from Carter Lecture Fund 

Committee 307.00 
Due from Federal Grants 

Disability Assistance 173.62 
Loans Authorised 

TOTAL ASSETS 



38,398.99 
1.009.k23.5l 



56k. 00 

U, 070.2k 
iQ5,k55.7i 

6k, 855. 30 

l,k70.08 

1.112.5k 

68,029.7k 
8l,362.k0 

1*76.01 
1,967.08 

50,588.35 
20.198.05 



18,088.89 
60k. 90 

Tf73o- 

229.70 



20,172.62 
18,250.00 
& ,802. 35 



60k.k9 
27,877.06 
6,166.52 

693.26 
k80.62 



971, 02k. 52 
265.00 



110,089.95 



67,k37.92 
lk9,392.1k 



2,kk3.09 
k59.00 

70, 786 .1*0 



18,693.79 
31k. 06 



93, 22k. 97 



35,821.95 
56.066.00 



1,576,018.79 



106 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
BALANCE SHEET - December 31, 1963 



LIABILITIES & RESERVES 

Temporary Loans/Anticipation of Reimbursement 22,800.00 
Overestimate M.D.C. Sewer Assessment 1963 3,623.27 
Water Guaranteed Deposits 5,2144.89 

Sewer Guaranteed Deposits %0. 31 6,185.20 

Premium Sale of Bonds L.12.79 
Accrued Interest Sale of Bonds 2,ol8.55 
Road Machinery Fund 180.25 
Sale of Cemetery Lots l4.,360.00 
School Lunch Program 12,373.76 
High School Athletic Association 2,067.10 
Federal Grants/Schools : 

George Barden Fund 137.00 

Public Law #87i*. 21,14.65.83 

N.D.E.A. Public Law #85-86I(. 15, 714-9. >4-6 37,352.29 
Federal Granta/Charlties : 

Aid to Dependent Children 7,096.13 

Administration -M6.09 7,832.22 

Old Age Assistance 9, 2*6. OH 

Administration 2,290.88 11,514.6.96 

Medical Assistance for Aged 2,850.66 

Administration 993. 3I4. 3,81+4.00 

Disability Assistance Admin. Ijj8.k2 60,723.89 

Recoveries: Old Age Assist. /Aid to Dep. Child. 3,966.91 

Veterans Aid 857. kO 4, 821;. 31 

Agency Account: Group Life Insurance/Town 2,095*02 

Employee Deductions 175.00 

Blue Cross Deductions 1,666.78 

U. S. Savings Bond Deductions 9.36 

Fish 8c Game Licenses Due Commonwealth 190.00 

Dog Licenses Due County 5k. 50 k, 190.66 

Tax Possessions/Duplicate Seles 201.7k 
Redemption of Assigned Tax Titles 51.81 
Tailings/Unclaimed Checks l89.9k 
Reserved Until Collected/Revenues: 

Departmental Revenues Aocts. Receivable 20,172.62 

Motor Vehicle Excise Revenue 6k, 855.30 

Special Assessments Revenue I5l,97l4..76 

Tax Title & Possession Revenue 70,786.(4.0 

State & County Aid to Highways 25,200.00 

Water Revenue 21,136.88 

Sewer Revenue 314.06 35k,kk0.02 

Reserve for Petty Cash Advances 265.00 
Overlay Acoounts: 

Levy 1959 2I4.O.8O 

1962 10,927.33 

1963 26.U07.10 37,575.23 
Reserve Fund/Overlay Surplus k, 63k. 62 
Appropriation Accounts/Non-Revenue 



Street Betterments 1962 3,877.31). 

. ).U 6 

Water Betterments 1961 k,001.9H 



1963 12, 270.14-6 16,147.80 



1962 12,908.78 

1963 9,108.06 26,018.82 
Water Development - Chestnut St. Wellfield 23,713.93 

Water Improvement - Barrows Wellfield 3,326.82 27,Ok0.75 

School Construction: 

Boutwell Street School 5,577.40 
North Intermediate School 13, 794. 60 

Woburn Street School 518,471.33 
High School Athletic Field 926.54 

Wildwood Street School 2.999.55 541,769. 14.8 

Construction of Municipal Garage 318.73 
Construction Fire-Police Building 260.18 
Construct & Equip New Police Building U.16 
Appropriation Accounts/General Appropriation 

Encumber. Carried to 196I4. 6,062.65 

Civil Defense 1,883.17 

Board of Registrars 750.00 

Town Manager Account 2,500.00 

Planning Board 2,000.00 

Extending Fire Alarm 586.914- 

Purchase of Highway Truck 861,56 

Chap. 90 Const. 1962 866.39 

1963 8,827.00 

Conatr. Cemetery Garage 3,000.00 

Hot Top Avenues-Cemetery 2,000.00 

Permanent Bldg. Com. Exp. lj.11.80 
Engineering Exp. k, 175. 80 

Purchase Land-Woburn St. Sch. 18,650.00 
PPurchase Land/Bldg. 

(New Library Fecilities) 29,382.27 

Ipswich R. Drainage Program 20,000.00 101,957.58 

Main St. Wellfield Dev. 18, 760.60 120,718.18 

Water Available Surplus 78,814.9.14.9 
Surplus Revenue 187,107.06 
Loans Authorized & Unissued 56,066.00 

TOTAL LIABILITIES & RESERVES $ 1.576.018.79 

107 



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FIRE ALARM SIGNALS 



32 Boutwell School 

33 Buzzell School 
35 Center School 

37 Glen Rd. School 

38 High School 

41 Mildred Rogers School 

42 North Intermediate 
School 

44 Swain School 
46 Walker School 
48 West School 
SI Whitefield School 
53 Wildwood School 

121 Main & Church Sts. 

122 Main St. & 
Middlesex Ave. 

1222 Boy State Steel Co. 

123 Main & Clark Sts. 

124 Washington Ave. 

125 Wilmington Plaza 

126 Main St. & Bridge Lane 

1 27 Brand Ave. & Wiser St. 

128 Baker St. & Taplin Ave. 

1 29 Phillips Ave. & Wiser St. 

131 Hobson Ave.&Miles St. 

132 Main St. & 
Massachusetts Ave. 

1 33 Massachusetts Ave. & 
River St. 

134 Main & Harnden Sts. 

135 St. Dorothy's Church 

136 Veranda Ave. 

137 Main St. & Grove Ave. 

138 Grove & Wild Aves. 

139 Grove Ave. & 
Burnap St. 

141 Grove Ave. & lake St. 

142 Main St. & Glen Rd. 
1 43 Main & Lake Sts. 

144 Lake St. & Fitz Terrace 

145 Lake St. & Warren Rd. 

146 Main & Davis Sts. 
1 47 Fairfield Ave. 

148 Marjorie Rd. 

149 Main St. at Tewksbury 
Line 



211 Burlington & Floradale 
Aves. 

2111 Diamond Crystal Salt 
Company 

2112 Sweetheart Plastic Corp. 

212 Burlington Ave. 8. 
Harris St. 

213 Cedar St. & Burt Rd. 

214 Deming Way (Old Age 
Housing) 

215 Burlington Ave. 8t 
Chestnut St. 

216 Chestnut St. & 
Butters Row 

217 Chestnut St. & Mill Rd. 

218 Chestnut St. & 
Hillside Way 

219 Hillside Way at 
Burlington Line 

221 Chestnut St. near 
Golf Club 

222 Chestnut St. at Woburn 
Line 

223 Marion & Day Sts. 

224 Marion & Clifton Sts. 

225 Marion St. to 
Chestnut St. 

226 Roberts Road 

227 Burlington Ave. 8. 
Boutwell St. 

228 Boutwell St. & Taft Rd. 

229 Taft & Swain Rds. 
231 Roosevelt Rd. 



232 Burlington Ave. & 
Dell Drive 

233 Burlington Ave. & 
Swain Rd. 

234 Beech St. 

235 Burlington Ave. & 
Forest St. 

236 Burlington Ave. at 
Burlington Line 

237 Forest St. & Congress St. 

238 Forest St. & 
Randolph Rd. 

239 Forest St. & 
Cochrane Rd. 

241 Elwood Rd. 

242 Forest St, & 
Edwards Rd. 

251 Shawsheen Ave. & 
Canal St. 

252 Canal St. & Burt Rd. 

253 Grand St. 

254 Nassau Ave. & 
Dunton Rd. 

255 Shawsheen Ave. 8i 
Carter Lane 

256 Carter Lane 8. 
Norfolk St. 

257 Amherst Rd. 

258 Auburn Ave. 

259 Ferguson Rd. 

261 Shawsheen Ave. & 
Aldrich Rd. 

262 Aldrich Rd. S. 
Hardin St. 

263 Aldrich Rd. & 
Kendall St. 

264 Aldrich Rd. & 
Boutwell St. 

265 Aldrich Rd. & Forest St. 

266 Winston Ave. 

267 Aldrich Rd. at 
Billerica Line 

268 Shawsheen Ave. near 
Cranberry Bog 

269 Wilton Drive 

271 Shawsheen Ave. 8. 
Bond St. 

273 Shawsheen Ave. & 
Hopkins St. 

274 Hopkins 8i Columbia 
Streets 

275 Hopkins & Dorchester 
Streets 

276 Hopkins St. at 
Billerica Line 

277 Shawsheen Ave. & 
Nichols St. 

278 Nichols St. & 
Fairmeadow Rd. 

279 Fairmeadow & 
Jere Rds. 

281 Nichols St. at 
Billerica Line 

282 Shawsheen Ave. at 
Billerica Line 

311 Main St. & Dublin Ave. 

312 Main & Lowell Sts. 
3121 Hoyden Mica Co. 

313 Main St. & Butters Row 

314 Main St. at Town Park 

315 Main & Eames Sts. 

316 Eames St. 

3161 J. W. Greer Co. 

3162 National Polychemical 
Co., Inc. 

3163 Dragon Cement Co. 

3164 Raffi & Swanson Inc. 

317 Cook Ave. 

318 Main St. at Woburn 
Line 



321 Lowell & Parker Sts. 

322 Parker & Blackstone 
Streets 

323 Lowell & Cross Sts. 

324 Lowell & Bay Sts. 
3241 Avco Corp. 

325 Lowell & Woburn Sts. 

326 Woburn & Elm Sts. 

327 Woburn St. & 
Brentwood Ave. 

328 Woburn St. & 
Morse Ave. 

329 Woburn & Eames Sts. 

3291 Terrell Corp. 

3292 Webtex Cement 

3293 Ritter Trucking 

331 Woburn St. at 
Woburn Line 

332 Strout Ave. 

333 Lowell St. & 
Woodland Rd. 

334 Lowell & West Sts. 

335 West St. & Westdale 
Avenue 

336 Ayotte St. & Crest Ave. 

337 Nickerson Ave. 

338 West St. & 
Suncrest Ave. 

339 Suncrest Ave. & 
Meadow Lane 

341 West St. at Reading 
Line 

342 Lowell St., Rte. 93 and 
Reading Line 

411 Church St., Fire Station 

412 Church & Columbia Sts. 

413 Church & Beacon Sts. 

414 Beacon St. & 
Belmont Ave. 

415 State St. & 
Fairview Ave. 

416 Church & Clark Sts. 

417 Methodist Church 

418 Church St. & 
Thurston Ave. 

419 Church 8. Adams Sts. 

421 Chandler 8. Kelley Rds. 

422 Adams St. Ext. 

423 Church St. & 
Middlesex Ave. 

424 Middlesex Ave. & 
Adelaide St. 

425 Middlesex Ave. & 
Clark St. 

426 Clark St. & 
Railroad Ave. 

427 Middlesex Ave. 8. 
Adams St. 

428 St. Thomas' Church 

429 Middlesex Ave. 8. 
School St. 

431 School St. & Drury Lane 

432 Drury Lane & 
Loumac Rd. 

433 Powderhouse Circle 

434 Middlesex Ave. & 
Wildwood St. 

435 Wildwood St. near 
Cemetery 

436 Wildwood St. near 
Vets Housing 

437 Wildwood & Woburn 
Streets 

438 Wing Rd. 

51 1 Middlesex Ave. & 
Glen Rd. 

512 Glendale Circle 

513 Glen Rd. & 
Lawrence St. 



514 Lawrence St. & 
Lawrence Ct. 

515 Lawrence St. & 
Hamlin Lane 

516 Glen Rd. at 
R.R. Crossing 

517 Glen Rd. & Fay St. 

518 Glen Rd. & King St. 

519 King St. & Garden Ave. 

521 King & Kilby Sts. 

522 King cV'Broad Sts. 

523 Glen Rd. & Cypress St. 

524 Glen Rd. & Brattle St. 

525 Glen Rd. 8, Harnden St. 

526 Glen & Miller Rds. 

527 Faulkner & Beeching 
Aves. 

528 Faulkner & Allston 
Aves. 

529 Jones Ave. 

531 Town Hall 

532 Congregational Church 

533 Middlesex Ave. & 
Federal St. 

534 Federal & Concord 
Streets 

535 Federal & Grant Sts. 

536 Federal & Wilson Sts. 

537 Federal & Lincoln Sts. 

538 Federal & Pershing Sts. 

539 Federal & Liberty Sts. 

541 Federal & Woburn Sts. 

542 Woburn & West Sts. 

543 West & Kilmarnock Sts. 

545 Woburn St. at 
R.R. Crossing 

546 Concord & Woburn Sts. 

547 Concord St. ot Rte. 93 

548 Concord St. ot North 
Reading Line 

549 Woburn St. at No. 281 

551 Middlesex & Mystic 
Aves. 

551 2 Photon Inc. 

5513 D. F. Munroe Paper Co. 

5514 Waltham Door & 
Window Co. 

552 Middlesex Ave. & Shady 
Lane Drive 

5521 Mytron Inc. 

553 Shady Lone Drive & 
Oakdale Rd. 

554 Shady Lane Drive & 
Birchwood Rd. 

555 Shady Lane Drive 8i 
Sprucewood Rd. 

556 Pinewood & Oakdale 
Roads 

557 Birchwood 8. Judith Rds. 

558 Shady Lane Drive & 
Lawrence St. 



61 1 No. Wilmington 
Shopping Center 

612 Middlesex Ave. & 
North St. 

613 North St. & 
Pineridge Rd. 

614 North St & Marcia Rd. 

615 Middlesex Ave. & 
High St. 

616 Linda 8. Carolyn Rds. 

617 High & Woburn Sts. 

618 Woburn & Park Sts. 

619 Park St. & Gowing Rd. 

621 Gowing 8. Marcus Rds. 

622 Park St. at No. Reading 
Line 

623 Middlesex Ave. & 
Salem St. 



624 Arlene & Catherine 
Aves. 

625 Barbara & Dorothy 
Aves. 

626 Salem St. at 
R.R. Crossing 

627 Salem & Cunningham 
Streets 

628 Salem St. & 
McDonald Rd. 

629 McDonald Rd. to End 

631 Royal St. 

632 Salem St. at Tewksbury 
Line 

633 Salem & Ballardvale 
Streets 

634 Ballardvale St. at 
Rte. 125 

635 Ballardvale St. at 
No. 211 

6351 Charles River Breeding 
Laboratories 

636 Ballardvale St. at 
No. 326 

637 Ballardvale St. at 
Andover Line 

638 Salem St. at Rte. 93 

639 Salem & Woburn Sts. 

641 Woburn St. 8. 
Hathaway Rd. 

642 Hawthorne Rd. 

643 Hothawoy 8. 
Sheridan Rds. 

644 Hathaway & Gunderson 
Roads 

645 Salem St. & Thrush Rd. 

646 Thrush Rd. & 
Marie Drive 

647 Salem St. at North 
Reading Line 

6471 Cronin's Pit 

6472 Benevento's Pit 

648 Woburn & Andover 
Streets 

6481 Pumping Station 
(Water Dept.) 

6482 Insul Tab. Co. 
Ainsworth Rd. 

6483 Highway Dept. 

649 Andover St. & Rte. 125 

651 Andover St. at No. 319 

652 Andover St. at Andover 
Line 

SPECIAL SIGNALS 

1 Test 

2 All out (test 9 a. m. & 
9 p. m.) 

3 Special Call 

4 Brush Fire 

5 Police Call 
666 Civil Defense 

7 Boy Scouts 

22 No School (7 a. m. & 
7:15 a. m. ) 

2 Followed by 3 rounds 
of box — second alarm 

3 Followed by 3 rounds 
of box — general alarm 

MUTUAL AID 
(two rounds only) 

8 Out of Town 

81 To Andover 

82 To Billerica 

83 To Burlington 

84 To Lowell 

85 To No. Reading 

86 To Reading 

87 To Tewksbury 

88 To Woburn 



POLICE 
Numbers 
8-3331 or 8-3332 



AMBULANCE 
Numbers 
8-3200 or 8-3346 



FIRE 
Numbers 
8-3200 or 8-3346 



WFFLLS BINDERY INC. 
ALT HAM, M/oS. 
MAY 1971